How Will Consumers Benefit From Connected Cars?

 

How Will Consumers Benefit From Connected Cars?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/janakirammsv/2016/06/06/how-will...

After Internet of Things (IoT), Connected Cars is the most used buzzword in the industry. From automobile manufacturers to software vendors to telecom operators to consumer electronic companies, everyone is excited about the connected vehicle phenomenon. With the power of 20 modern PCs, contemporary cars pack more punch than any another computing device. They contain more than 100 million lines of code that can process up to 25GB of data in an hour.

One of the factors that’s turning this concept into a reality is ubiquitous connectivity. The rise of 4G LTE and emerging 5G networks enable new scenarios for the connected vehicles. Automobile manufacturers are partnering with telecom companies to bring connectivity to their vehicles.

The scenario of connected vehicles is an ultimate use case of IoT, where multiple vehicles interact with each other while coordinating with the road infrastructure like the traffic signals. They can send real-time alerts to the service center about the condition of your car.

Keeping aside the hype created by the industry players, Connected Cars do offer value to customers.

In-Car Content and Services

Connected Cars take the infotainment to the next level by delivering popular content to the passengers. Today, car entertainment is mostly confined to FM radio and Bluetooth connectivity. With the availability of high-speed networks, popular streaming services such as Pandora, Spotify, and Hulu become available. Consumers will have a huge choice of digital content.

Apple and Google are competing to becoming the brain behind in-car infotainment. Apple’s Car Play embeds familiar iOS experience in the dashboard which gives access to a variety of third-party apps available in the App Store. Android Auto can stream music from Google Play Music straight into your car. It also makes it easy to access your favorite apps and content in the car. Passengers can purchase or rent media on the go.

Consumers can use familiar voice-activated technologies such as Siri and Google Now to interact with the infotainment system. Amazon is partnering with Ford to bring its popular Alexa engine to the car.

Advanced Navigation

While most of the modern cars are equipped with GPS-based navigation systems, Connected Cars will include smart navigation features integrated with location-based services. For example, your car can prompt you to stop at the next fuel station based on the current fuel levels. It can find the distance to the nearest refilling station and automatically set the destination of your navigation system.

The advanced navigation system of your car can access your calendar to calculate the time it takes to get to your next meeting. Based on the real-time traffic and weather conditions, your car will recommend the best route to the destination.

Based on the context and access to past datasets, Connected Cars can predict the driver’s destination and make suggestions for best time and optimal routes for travel. They can suggest points‐of‐interest and preferred brands based on prior selections and customizations. Connected Cars can also learn from other car driver behaviours and preferences for a community experience. For example, they will be able to recommend the best restaurant on the highway based on the ratings from other passengers.

Driver & Passenger Safety

Driver and passenger safety are the key benefits of a Connected Car, which warn the driver of external hazards and internal responses of the vehicle to hazards. The central monitoring system tracks multiple sensors for warning signs and indications related to the health of the car. It can even check external weather conditions and hazardous road conditions to alert the drivers in time.

Most of the cars are already compliant with on-board diagnostics (OBD-II) standard that can interface with external devices. There are multiple mobile apps that can communicate with OBD devices via Bluetooth, WiFi, or even GSM. Almost every car manufactured during the last decade comes with OBD functionality.

Connected Cars can also avert collisions by tracking the speed and the proximity with other vehicles.

Smart vehicles can capture the state of drivers through cameras and warn them when they suffer from fatigue and tiredness. The system can even optimize the temperature, music, and seat functions to ensure that the driver is alert.

Fuel and Cost Efficiency

Connected Cars allow the driver to reach a destination quickly, safely, and in a cost-efficient manner. By communicating with the traffic signals and the road infrastructure, a smart car can slow down before reaching a signal. It can even automatically stop and start the car just before the lights turn green. This feature translates to a greater fuel efficiency.

By tracking the driving patterns, Connected Cars can assess the wear and tear of a vehicle. This information can be leveraged by insurance agencies in calculating the premium that’s based on usage and the maintenance of the car.

Service stations can periodically gather the diagnostic information over the air to perform predictive analysis. They can proactively reach out to the vehicle owners to schedule a service appointment.

Convenient Payment Models

Mobile payments are already a hit with consumers. Apple Pay and Android Pay enabled consumers to safely and securely transact through their digital wallets. Both Visa and Mastercard are working with automobile companies to bring electronic payments to smart vehicles.

Next time when you pass through a toll gate, your digital wallet embedded in the car dashboard will automatically charge your card. Same is the case with parking slots in malls and public places.

--
Never argue with a pig. It makes you look foolish and it anoys the hell out of the pig!

When I attended

a presentation from Verizon (this is 5 yrs. ago), an example they used was you are driving and you need to park your car in a garage. You make such a selection from your car, and your car almost drives itself into the garage. You are now able to shave, text, email, do makeup on the way.

imho one serious disadvantage is that the mfg. can attempt to shut down those who work on their own cars, i.e. force them to pay for service.

I use the factory software to service one of my cars. The difference is at the dealership, the same software is connected to the mfg. in Germany. Mine, is not.

Translated this means that instead of having a computer in the car, which tells you that you need an inspection, brake fluid, microcabin filter, oil change, spark plugs, etc., this info is known at the mfg. level. Oh, you waited until 45,000.1 to change your plugs? That is outside the recommended interval by 1/10 mile, and your warranty is hereby voided.

We need to push for disconnected cars.

Having been involved

Having been involved with connected vehicles for 9 years before I retired, I will state there is a lot of hogwash in the prognostications.

Connected vehicles operate in licensed spectrum and are limited to very low power. A lot of what the magazine article states could never be done over the spectrum assigned for connected vehicles because of the archaic protocol designated for this function by the IEEE and the extremely low power levels for both the roadside and vehicular equipment set by the FCC.

All the infotainment features including mapping would have to be provided by a cellular service controlled by the big players, the cell companies, Cisco, Qualcomm and the like. Data transferred between vehicles and to or from roadside stations is limited to location messages (Here I am), emergency status messages(slamming the brakes, airbag deployment, etc.), and right-of-way messages from emergency responders.

Messages to and from the roadside will primarily be local weather conditions, (ice, road water levels,) and collecting tolls. Roadside equipment will also collect information from vehicles such as if the wipers and lights are on and if the vehicle has detected any skidding due to slick road conditions. From that information, the count of cars and the average time a vehicle is in contact with a particular piece of roadside equipment such things as average speeds and travel times can be determined and resent to the vehicles for trip planning.

While the USDOT is looking into mandating all vehicles be equipped to send the data between vehicles and the roadside, no funds have been allocated for the installation of any roadside equipment.

--
"In order to be old and wise, one first must have been young and stupid."

Concerns

I think there is little doubt that the consumer would benefit from a "connected" vehicle should it become a reality.

My concerns are these:

1 - Will it contribute to the distracted driving problem?

2 - Will law enforcement use it to issue tickets to speeders etc?

3 - Will advertisers use data to send targeted ads to consumers?

4 - Will I be able to turn it off if I so Desire?

good questions

bdhsfz6 wrote:

I think there is little doubt that the consumer would benefit from a "connected" vehicle should it become a reality.

My concerns are these:

1 - Will it contribute to the distracted driving problem?

The answer will depend on how the unit is designed/installed in the vehicle. The pilot units had a display as a warning and I believe made a sound when an alert/emergency message was present. The last thinking was the display could provide a countdown timer for green lights letting the driver know how many seconds before an equipped signal in an intersection would change. The display would also flash and warn if two vehicles were about to collide and would warn of an approaching emergency vehicle that was responding. There is more planned, but the messages and things hadn't been worked out when I retired.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

2 - Will law enforcement use it to issue tickets to speeders etc?

The simple answer is no. There is no personally identifiable information transmitted. The only routine data shared is the "Here I Am" message which reports your current position (from built-in GPS), the direction of your travel and speed. It doesn't state "I am the silver Honda owned by XXX." In fact the IP address for the installed unit will randomly change just so a vehicle cannot be tracked by its IP address.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

3 - Will advertisers use data to send targeted ads to consumers?

That's an unknown. Depending on how the vehicle manufacturers implement the radio units, they may be able to query the unit as you drive by say a Chevy dealer and get maintenance data from the car. You would then receive an email or phone call from your dealer saying something like "Your car needs XXX service." OnStar already provides this to a limited degree for GM owners. As the spectrum is licensed and open to both local government and private individuals, it all depends on applications which are developed. Your ability to opt out is something that hadn't been discussed as far as I know.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

4 - Will I be able to turn it off if I so Desire?

No. It's a safety feature that would be built in and mandated by the government. It would be like seat belts or airbags, something built into the vehicle at manufacture.

--
"In order to be old and wise, one first must have been young and stupid."

food for thought

here it is 2016, and the number of cars sold in the USA with manual transmissions is 7%, and headed towards a floor of 0%.

How much lazier, and distracted, do we want to be while we drive, here in the US?

Remember way back when, how EZPass would not be used to track criminal activity? Of course this is decades old by now.

How does this work, hmmmm...when EZPass rejects a subpoena?

The court issues a search warrant of their administrative offices, and the information sought is secured.

Kinda like how you can't sue your employer for a work-related injury, or how a taxicab avoids a 10 mil. liability by going out of business as a single unit.

Why would connected cars be mandated, now that's just plain silly.

When's the last time you plugged something into your OBDII slot (or enet in newer cars), just because your insurance co. asked you to? When the rental car co. asked me to wear an ankle bracelet, I said nein danke.

@ Boxcar

Box Car wrote:
bdhsfz6 wrote:

I think there is little doubt that the consumer would benefit from a "connected" vehicle should it become a reality.

My concerns are these:

1 - Will it contribute to the distracted driving problem?

The answer will depend on how the unit is designed/installed in the vehicle. The pilot units had a display as a warning and I believe made a sound when an alert/emergency message was present. The last thinking was the display could provide a countdown timer for green lights letting the driver know how many seconds before an equipped signal in an intersection would change. The display would also flash and warn if two vehicles were about to collide and would warn of an approaching emergency vehicle that was responding. There is more planned, but the messages and things hadn't been worked out when I retired.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

2 - Will law enforcement use it to issue tickets to speeders etc?

The simple answer is no. There is no personally identifiable information transmitted. The only routine data shared is the "Here I Am" message which reports your current position (from built-in GPS), the direction of your travel and speed. It doesn't state "I am the silver Honda owned by XXX." In fact the IP address for the installed unit will randomly change just so a vehicle cannot be tracked by its IP address.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

3 - Will advertisers use data to send targeted ads to consumers?

That's an unknown. Depending on how the vehicle manufacturers implement the radio units, they may be able to query the unit as you drive by say a Chevy dealer and get maintenance data from the car. You would then receive an email or phone call from your dealer saying something like "Your car needs XXX service." OnStar already provides this to a limited degree for GM owners. As the spectrum is licensed and open to both local government and private individuals, it all depends on applications which are developed. Your ability to opt out is something that hadn't been discussed as far as I know.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

4 - Will I be able to turn it off if I so Desire?

No. It's a safety feature that would be built in and mandated by the government. It would be like seat belts or airbags, something built into the vehicle at manufacture.

Thanks Boxcar. You're the man to ask for questions in this area.