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How about highest and lowest points? (above/below sea level)

 

I see the speed post, how about the highest and lowest points? (ground and air)I'm sure someone in Denver will have the highest and New Orleans the lowest smile
Then again someone could have climbed a volcano or something.
I wonder if a gps signal would reach down into the ocean? (a navy sub guy)

slowjazz wrote: I see the

slowjazz wrote:

I see the speed post, how about the highest and lowest points? (ground and air)I'm sure someone in Denver will have the highest and New Orleans the lowest smile
Then again someone could have climbed a volcano or something.
I wonder if a gps signal would reach down into the ocean? (a navy sub guy)

This summer, I went to Death Valley, and visited the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere (283 feet below sea level). Also, it was 120 degrees that day.

Has anyone visited the Dead Sea with their GPSr?

High and low points

My low point was at sea level when I was by Seattle.

My high point was about 32,000 feet, traveling at 560 mph in a 767.

--
nüvi 750 & 760

-->

dconsolla wrote:

This summer, I went to Death Valley, and visited the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere (283 feet below sea level). Also, it was 120 degrees that day.

Has anyone visited the Dead Sea with their GPSr?

I try to stay away from places that have Dead or Death in their names. twisted

--
America Moves By Truck --- Streetpilot 7200 & OOIDA --- www.accutracking.com userid= poifactory password= guest; "Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it."

What would happen

if you took a GPSr to the Space Station?

--
Lifetime NRA & USPSA member

10,000ft on ground

Somewhere I have a picture of my GPSr showing over 10,000 feet while I was exploring Mt. Charleston a couple of years ago.

My highest point with GPSr

dconsolla wrote:

This summer, I went to Death Valley, and visited the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere (283 feet below sea level).

I should also point out that about a month before my Death Valley trip I drove over Slumgullion Pass (elev. 11,530 ft) in Colorado, which is my highest trip with the GPSr. A few years earlier, I drove over Loveland Pass (11,990 ft), but I didn't have a GPSr at that time.

-Dave

.

I've seen my GPS reading a negative altitude in California on Highway 10 east of Palm Springs. I never took a picture of it.

The highest I've been is over 13,000 feet at the peak of Mauna Kia on the big island of Hawaii. It was quite a climb considering I started at sea level. I did take a picture of that one:

http://www.mts.net/~jwt/images/magellan-elev.jpg

GPS Illegal Above 60000 feet

jmar254 wrote:

if you took a GPSr to the Space Station?

It's not certain that a civilian receiver would work well that high as certain elevation range assumptions are made in the calculation. The GPS satellites themselves are still way above the ISS, but according to a GPS article on Wikipedia, "it is illegal in the United States to track vehicles of more than 60,000 feet in altitude".

I'm not sure how the national legality of all that works as once in space, the rules are quite different. Once on the ISS, are you still "in the USA" even when you're above it? Food for thought for lawyers -- OOT I suppose.

In Space

I doubt whether the GPSr would receive a satisfactory signal inside the space station or the shuttle. All metal, radiation shielding, etc, would pretty well preclude a sat signal from reaching the unit.

--
Frank Nuvi 2597LMT

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