Garmin GPS Built Into Cars

 

Does anyone have any experience maintaining a GPS unit that is built into a vehicle? How does it differ from the process I now use to update the maps, software, etc. on my standalone unit? Do they come with lifetime map updates and such?

To give a little background, I recently test-drove a couple of new vehicles with built-in NAV systems that looked like they were Garmin-based. I am used to plugging my standalone nuvi into a USB port on my computer and running either Garmin Express or POI Loader, but I imagine this process would be far more challenging when the device is bolted to the car. grin

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Garmin GPS Built Into Cars

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/45680

I am not sure if the above will actually answer your question, but we did have a similar thread recently.

My post from the "node" Jim1348 linked to.

My 2013 Jeep Wrangler has a Garmin based built in GPS, it can take POI's but it will erase any previously loaded POI files during the process. So if you want to update the POI files you need to reload them all, and at the same time, each time you run POI uploader it erases old ones. Plus it's a tad more difficult to do.

As for map updates they are very expensive, not current and not yearly. The first update to my 2013 unit was available in mid 2015 and the mapset seemed to be from early 2014.

The main reason to buy the built in unit for me was the "at the readiness" of it. Unlike the standalone unit where I'd have to get it out, set it up, plug it in etc. tap one button and it's on.

My in-dash unit will not allow you to enter info while moving, I can override that in a stand alone unit.

Bottom line, the in dash units are very convenient, but not as user friendly or inexpensive (when you consider most come with free map updates) as a stand alone unit.

--
. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

I think the only company

I think the only company that uses Garmin is Chrysler.
Sure wish Toyota did. Their Denso PITA is just that.

Car map Update

TO update the map on car must be done by a dealer.the price range is about $200.00 and they is not such thing as life time map update on car GPS.

Bummer.

Bummer.

Garmin GPS Built Into Cars

ruggb wrote:

I think the only company that uses Garmin is Chrysler.
Sure wish Toyota did. Their Denso PITA is just that.

There are 15 built-in/in-dash brands listed at the Garmin site.

Suzuki
Honda
VW
Chrysler
Dodge
Jeep
Ram
Fiat
Lancia
Skoda
Toyota
Paccar (in Europe?)
Seat (for big rigs)
Kenwood (don't know what manufacturer uses them)

See Garmin site:

https://auto-oem.garmin.com/landing/

Subaru

We do not have a built in GPS on our Subaru, but the Subaru GPS software does not look like Garmin. A map update costs $185 and this is for a single update. Do not worry since the latest map update was in 2013! If there is no update available you can't pay for it!

This does not look like a good deal...

dobs108 smile

With Jeep you can.

Driver 38 wrote:

TO update the map on car must be done by a dealer.the price range is about $200.00 and they is not such thing as life time map update on car GPS.

The Unconnect 430N my Wrangler came with is Garmin based and I was able to do the map update myself via SD card and a USB SD card reader. It wasn't painless like a standalone but eventually it worked. The company that offered the update, Here.com ($149.00), forgot to include an unlock files on the SD card, once we figured that out and had those files sent to me it was OK. As I mentioned above, the mapset was not the most current, but newer than the one it came with.

--
. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

Slow to evolve

I'm waiting for the day when car manufacturers give up on proprietary built-in GPS and A/V systems and adopt Android Auto / Apple Car Play and similar interfaces. It will be better for everyone (except maybe the greedy manufacturers who want to hold on to their high-margin accessories as long as they can....).

Good Thread and Good Info

This is a good thread. Thanks for info and link to the other thread as well.

Factory GPS map update

I updated a 2010 ACURA, I seem to remember it cost me about $100. They sent me a CD, Stuck it in the DVD drive and IT took about 15 minutes to do the first part of the update. You could not stop during this process or you would have to start over. At that point the update took about 8 hours. However you could use everything, including the GPS. The update would run when ever you were driving the car until it was finished. Pretty painless.

Factory GPS

I have couple of Honda vehicles and I believe the GPS untis are made by Alpine.

The normal cost to update the maps is $149, but they sometimes have a "sale" for $99, or free shipping.

Still pretty darn expensive......

And I cannot add any of my own POI's, proximity alarms etc.

Pioneer

I have a Pioneer AVIC-X950 and I have yet to see a map update. When they did, it was a SD Card that is needed to do the update.

--
Garmin: GPSIII / StreetPilot / StreetPilot Color Map / StreetPilot III / StreetPilot 2610 / GPSMAP60CSx / Nuvi 770 / Nuvi 765T / Nuvi 3490LMT * Pioneer: AVIC-80 / N3 / X950BH

What Honda do you have?

pratzert wrote:

I have couple of Honda vehicles and I believe the GPS untis are made by Alpine.

The normal cost to update the maps is $149, but they sometimes have a "sale" for $99, or free shipping.

Still pretty darn expensive......

And I cannot add any of my own POI's, proximity alarms etc.

I have a 2014 Honda Accord and I can all my own POIs.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Wife Nissan Juke has built in

I don't think its Garmin based, $149 for SD update, junk. My Frontier still has the built in Flip tray that takes 7XX and 8XX Nuvi's, love it.

Separate is Better

Better to buy a separate GPS. Easier and cheaper to maintain. Can be used in more than one vehicle.

--
romanviking

lol

romanviking wrote:

Better to buy a separate GPS. Easier and cheaper to maintain. Can be used in more than one vehicle.

Yeah. Sounds like you might even be better off buying a Garmin unit and velcro-ing it over top of the in-dash display, lol.

--
It's about the Line- If a line can be drawn between the powers granted and the rights retained, it would seem to be the same thing, whether the latter be secured by declaring that they shall not be abridged, or that the former shall not be extended.

In-The-Car Not Worth It...!

romanviking wrote:

Better to buy a separate GPS. Easier and cheaper to maintain. Can be used in more than one vehicle.

For the amount it costs you to purchase a "in-the-car" unit, (plus updates when and if you get them), one could buy the best stand alone Garmin they have (free maps, updates and traffic) and use it for many, many years into the future.

That being the case, (with all the difficulties one has with a "in-the-car unit), why would anyone even think about going that route?

Nuvi1300WTGPS

--
I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

Still use my Garmin....

Even though both of our Lexus (Lexii?) came with GPS built in, I still use my Garmin 2599 LMT exclusively.

If I had a choice, I wouldn't have a factory GPS at all, but many vehicles have them as part of the Climate/Audio/Maintenance system (they share the same touch screen).

--
"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks" ~ Excerpt from the notebooks of Lazarus Long, from Robert Heinlein's "Time Enough for Love"

i never figured out why built in would be better option

Aside from the cost and update issues, many units lock your passenger out from entering a route if you are moving.

Nissan built-in GPS

We bought a 2015 Murano with built-in GPS. It wasn't something we particularly wanted, but we did need to get it in order to get other tech stuff we did want with the car like backup cameras and blind-spot warning (which I *highly* recommend, if you'll bother to use them) which share the same video screen display. Nissan's GPS now does disable typed entry even by the passenger when the car is moving. On the other hand, it does allow driver or passenger voice entry to plot a new destination while the car is moving, but it's kinda stupid about voice comprehension, dumber than voice entry available on some Garmin GPS models. Sometimes I get ticked off having to drill through needlessly complicated menus and repeat myself with increasing enunciation and volume, probably more distracting than even typing (which I wouldn't do as a driver).

Here was another gotcha I did not anticipate until it actually happened. Get off on back roads, and I'm not talking dirt roads out west where there's nothing but livestock for miles, but even county or state numbered routes not far from where we live, and the Nissan GPS suddenly advises something like, "Insufficient data. Ending route guidance. Obey all local traffic regulations." Gee thanks a lot! There are evidently significant holes in the street-name and/or speed-limit coverage, and you won't find out you're headed into one until you get there. Not cool. You can still see where you're going by following the plotted line on the map visually, but it stops talking to you.

Nissan map updates cost $149 or $179, lifetime option not available, but on the other hand, for their current cars, map updates don't require a trip to the dealer--they mail you an SDHC flash memory card you swap out yourself as easily as on a camera to get updated maps.

So all this stuff is very manufacturer-specific, obviously. I wouldn't go out of my way to get built-in GPS. It's more expensive and not as effective. Despite the annoying charging cables and devices to hold them, Garmin or cellphone navigation is better in my opinion.

--
JMoo On

Too expensive

They charge you an arm and a leg for in dash navigation and then they hit you again for the updates. No thanks.

--
Are we there yet?

Not easy

Helped friends with their Toyota and Mercedes GPS. Not intuitive or convenient.

Thanks... but...

This is all good info, but my original intent was more basic. On my standalone unit, I plug the "A" side of my USB cable into my computer and the "B" side (actually microUSB) into the GPS. If I want to update the firmware and/or maps, I run the "Garmin Express" application If I want to update my POI Factory POIs, I run "POI Loader." My computer then copies the files to my GPS.

Is the procedure the same to update an in-vehicle GPS? Or does the procedure require that I copy some files to a USB stick and then insert the stick into one of the USB "A" connectors in the vehicle's dashboard?

(Some of you suggested that the only way to update was to get a new USB stick from the dealer?)

it depends

beagle.fan wrote:

~snip~

Is the procedure the same to update an in-vehicle GPS? Or does the procedure require that I copy some files to a USB stick and then insert the stick into one of the USB "A" connectors in the vehicle's dashboard?

(Some of you suggested that the only way to update was to get a new USB stick from the dealer?)

It depends on the car and the GPS manufacturer. For my 2013 Jeep Wrangler the update was offered by "here.com" via a Chrysler website, the update was on an SD card, my Wrangler does not take a SD card so "here.com" also included a USB SD card reader. The update was not as simple as plugging it in, there was a very specific procedure to follow to get the update into the system.

This procedure had to be followed exactly or it wouldn't work. It was a bit tedious. Involved both the vehicle and a computer for verification.

So, as you can see, there is no simple way to answer your question. There may be a vehicle where it is that simple, I know my Jeep was not.

I suggest you research the particular vehicle and GPS system for that vehicle for your answer.

--
. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

Solved that with my own custom Garmin Nuvi buit-in solution

I solved that "problem" (and saved myself a bundle of money) several years ago with my custom solution of a Garmin Nuvi in my car's dashboard which I installed. In my Honda it happened to fit nicely with some custom fascia I purchased online. It also has a backup camera in the 2798LMT model. I have a USB cable routed through the glove box whenever I need to apply an update. I hear some manufacturers are working on a WIFI solution when you pull into the driveway so that it obtains updates. That'll be cool instead of update DVDs and thumb drive updates! My other Honda with built-in factory navigation took about 1.5 hours to upload the contents of the map update DVD and then another 15 hours (yes not a typo) to extract and unpack the update over a long trip. Wow.

http://www.driveaccord.net/forums/146-audio-electronics-ligh...

Depends on the specific vehicle

As soberbyker said, there is no one answer that fits all vehicles with OEM GPS, except that it's likely more expensive and may be less convenient than updating maps on a Garmin at home.

There are at least three systems for updating OEM car GPS maps:
1. The dealer has to do it.
2. You can connect a USB stick.
3. You can swap out a SDHC or similar (camera-type) memory card.

Any way you do it, you likely have to buy the maps through the car manufacturer, and they will likely charge a lot more than you might think you should have to pay for this if you're used to Garmin updates.

It's more than manufacturer specific. It also changes depending on the model and year. So you might need to know 2012 Cadillac Escalade to get the right answer, not just Cadillac.

To find out what it will take for the car you're considering, you can:
1. Websearch "GPS update 2012 Cadillac Escalade" or whatever.
2. Websearch the specific year, manufacturer, model owner's manual, which should describe map updates.
3. Call the dealer's service department.

--
JMoo On

GM

GM map updates are purchased from:

http://gmnavdisc.navigation.com/home/en_US/GMNA/USD

Update comes on a USB stick, for only $160.00 plus $4.00 shipping sad , takes 45-50 minutes to install and your vehicle MUST be running the whole time and in Park for at least the first 10 - 15 minutes of the update.

I just bought a 2016 Chevy Equinox LTZ with GM Nav which has the current maps installed (late 2015). So far it's pretty much useless at finding POIs and if it wasn't for Voice commands it would be a PITA to enter a street address.

It has some nice features but compared to my Nuvi 3597 it is not much of a GPS.

--
Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD and TomTom XXL540s, HereWeGo for Android.

In Dash GPS

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

For the amount it costs you to purchase a "in-the-car" unit, (plus updates when and if you get them), one could buy the best stand alone Garmin they have (free maps, updates and traffic) and use it for many, many years into the future.

That being the case, (with all the difficulties one has with a "in-the-car unit), why would anyone even think about going that route?

I don't think hardly anyone offers the in-dash GPS as a standalone add-on any more. They virtually all bundle it as part of a package. Want leather seats? You have to buy the 'Deluxe Whatchamacallit' package for $3000 that includes one or two things that you want, and a bunch of stuff you don't care about.

This is my problem

johnc wrote:

I don't think hardly anyone offers the in-dash GPS as a standalone add-on any more. They virtually all bundle it as part of a package. Want leather seats? You have to buy the 'Deluxe Whatchamacallit' package for $3000 that includes one or two things that you want, and a bunch of stuff you don't care about.

This is one of the problems I have encountered when trying to decide what vehicle to buy. The vehicles I am most interested in come with a GPS whether I like it or not.

On the surface, a built-in GPS seems to me like it would be "convenient"-- no worries about remembering to bring the GPS with you. And the audio from the integrated unit is way better than my standalone device. Is it worth the money? I don't think so. Based on what y'all are saying, it sounds like I could buy a new standalone GPS for the amount of money that some of these manufacturers want for their updates.

.

beagle.fan wrote:

~snip~

On the surface, a built-in GPS seems to me like it would be "convenient"-- no worries about remembering to bring the GPS with you.

~snip~

I have had Garmin's for a long time, my first was a 330c Street Pilot, state of the art at the time. My most recent a Nuvi 2689, eons ahead of the 330c. The in dash I have is Garmin based and somewhere between the two.

When I bought my Jeep I specifically wanted an in dash GPS, for the convenience. Every now and then I'll run into a detour, in an area I am somewhat familiar with getting through, but not the surrounding area, and being able to tap a button and the GPS gets my around the detour is worth it to me. I don't set up my standalone if I know my route (except in my work truck where I set it up every day regardless) so for that alone I'm glad I have the in dash unit.

--
. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

Thanks

Thanks for the tips, everyone!

Toyota GPS Voice Recognition

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it. Even the dealer was perplexed. I have talked with several other Toyota owners with the same problem. My Garmin, however, listens and jumps into action immediately. Someone really needs to work on this.

--
JG - Nuvi 2460

try

jcg4550 wrote:

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it.

speaking to it in Japanese.

--
"In order to be old and wise, one first must have been young and stupid."

Garmin GPS Built Into Cars

Box Car wrote:
jcg4550 wrote:

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it.

speaking to it in Japanese.

Careful. The Camry is built in Kentucky so you have to twang a little. Of course, it accepts southern Indiana too LOL.

However, I always tell them I don't want it. Not at one update a year--for $100-150.

eventually

you will eventually just download updates like books and music and movies...you may even be able to do now I haven't really looked to see it there are updates out there floating around on the web that are free to grab

Yup

johnc wrote:

I don't think hardly anyone offers the in-dash GPS as a standalone add-on any more. They virtually all bundle it as part of a package. Want leather seats? You have to buy the 'Deluxe Whatchamacallit' package for $3000 that includes one or two things that you want, and a bunch of stuff you don't care about.

That's why we have a factory GPS in my wife's new Flex. She loves the car and it has several options she was determined to have - but which required purchasing a package that included the factory GPS.

FWIW, I would have been much less ticked off by the price if the GPS itself were not so much worse than my TomTom. I tried to use it alongside my VIA 1535 on a Los Angeles - San Francisco trip at the beginning of this month and found it to be pathetically bad. It is so poorly done that even if updates were $5 a year I would not pay for them - which is a shame because the potential benefits of that large in-dash screen could be very nice if the design were well done.

- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 500

maybe

sethr wrote:
Box Car wrote:
jcg4550 wrote:

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it.

speaking to it in Japanese.

Careful. The Camry is built in Kentucky so you have to twang a little. Of course, it accepts southern Indiana too LOL.

However, I always tell them I don't want it. Not at one update a year--for $100-150.

But I'll bet the electronics are still shipped in from Japan.

--
"In order to be old and wise, one first must have been young and stupid."

maybe is fixed

jcg4550 wrote:

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it. Even the dealer was perplexed. I have talked with several other Toyota owners with the same problem. My Garmin, however, listens and jumps into action immediately. Someone really needs to work on this.

I have the 2016 XLE and have no problems with voice recognition either for navigating, playing the radio or making a call, however my wife who took the voice training lighthearted has a difficult time with the system understanding her commands.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Built in GPS

My wife has a Honda Accord Touring model with the factory Unit and she hates it. Too complicated and not at all intuitive.

She has the 3490 sitting on the dash above the built in unit.

I tried that ...

-et- wrote:

~snip~
I tried to use it alongside my VIA 1535 on a ~snip~ trip

I did that on a trip from the Phila., PA area to Ocean City, NJ.

The Jeep has a Garmin based 430N and my standalone was is a Nuvi 2689.

The two chose different routes to get to the main highway but once on the highway they were matched up. I noticed the 430N would tell me of an upcoming turn sooner than the 2689. I also have a RADAR detector with built in GPS that displays my speed. The 2689 was closer to the RADAR detectors displayed speed, the 430N had me a mile and a half (MPH) faster than the other two. (see photo of the 3 linked below)

Otherwise I didn't see much of a difference.

http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x101/soberbyker/pa2a/Jeep...

--
. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

Voice recognition bad on Garmin

jcg4550 wrote:

I have a 2015 Toyota Highlander Limited with the built in GPS, of course. The voice recognition absolutely sucks. It can not understand what I ask for or even find anything close to it. Even the dealer was perplexed. I have talked with several other Toyota owners with the same problem. My Garmin, however, listens and jumps into action immediately. Someone really needs to work on this.

But the voice recognition on my standalone nuvi isn't very good either.
???

Given the sorry state of in-dash GPS...

why on Earth would you pay $1,000-2,000? Gimme a standalone and USB cable any day of the week, inconvenience notwithstanding.

--
"You can't get there from here"

because

TMK wrote:

why on Earth would you pay $1,000-2,000? Gimme a standalone and USB cable any day of the week, inconvenience notwithstanding.

Because if you want a specific trim level that has some features you must have the GPS is part of that trim and can't be removed, for instance the entry level Highlander LE doesn't come with GPS but if you want leather seats, moon roof, 2nd row captain chairs, plush leather on the doors and console you have to pay extra for those items that are standard in the XLE or the Limited so in the long run you wind up paying the same or more for a vehicle without GPS, so the $1,000-2,000 you mentioned saving may cost you more on the long run.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Having

Having just purchased a new vehicle with factory navigation, I would agree 100%, flaco.

--
Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD and TomTom XXL540s, HereWeGo for Android.

And then there are people like me, sorry to say

I just wanted it. I also wanted all the other neat stuff that came with the Honda Accord but I did want the built in GPS also.
I am learning to like it (notice I didn't say love it) as it is always there and if we are going somewhere we know and someplace is blocked from high water, as it was in Decatur this last weekend, we could look ahead to see what roads go the way we needed to go. We ended up turning around as the roads that looked to us to go in our direction were in a dead end area. This saved us a lot of driving and guessing as to which way to go.

And it helped my husband to say well I guess we did need it. Although I had my phone with me and didn't even take it out (but could have). smile

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Agree

flaco wrote:
TMK wrote:

why on Earth would you pay $1,000-2,000? Gimme a standalone and USB cable any day of the week, inconvenience notwithstanding.

Because if you want a specific trim level that has some features you must have the GPS is part of that trim and can't be removed, for instance the entry level Highlander LE doesn't come with GPS but if you want leather seats, moon roof, 2nd row captain chairs, plush leather on the doors and console you have to pay extra for those items that are standard in the XLE or the Limited so in the long run you wind up paying the same or more for a vehicle without GPS, so the $1,000-2,000 you mentioned saving may cost you more on the long run.

Yup. In my case, we looked at the new Honda Odyssey. Overall, it was a nice vehicle, but we absolutely HATED the built-in NAV system. Or to be more technically correct, we hated its less-than-intuitive user interface, which to us seemed unusable. But we would be stuck with it because its part of the package in the trim level that we wanted.

2016 honda?

beagle.fan wrote:

Yup. In my case, we looked at the new Honda Odyssey. Overall, it was a nice vehicle, but we absolutely HATED the built-in NAV system. Or to be more technically correct, we hated its less-than-intuitive user interface, which to us seemed unusable. But we would be stuck with it because its part of the package in the trim level that we wanted.

Was that a 2016 model?

I test rode the 2016 Honda Pilot and it has a Garmin system with commands very similar to my portable Garmin, I would have liked that system better than the Entune that came in our Toyota but the rest of the vehicle finish and performance was no comparison the Toyota in my book was the winner, just have to put up with the quirky nav system or for long trips bring my Garmin along

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

2016 Hondas

flaco wrote:
beagle.fan wrote:

Yup. In my case, we looked at the new Honda Odyssey. Overall, it was a nice vehicle, but we absolutely HATED the built-in NAV system. Or to be more technically correct, we hated its less-than-intuitive user interface, which to us seemed unusable. But we would be stuck with it because its part of the package in the trim level that we wanted.

Was that a 2016 model?

I test rode the 2016 Honda Pilot and it has a Garmin system with commands very similar to my portable Garmin, I would have liked that system better than the Entune that came in our Toyota but the rest of the vehicle finish and performance was no comparison the Toyota in my book was the winner, just have to put up with the quirky nav system or for long trips bring my Garmin along

Yes, it was a 2016 Odyssey. We also tested the Pilot, which IMHO has a MUCH better NAV system. My only complaint with it was the cost of maintaining the maps. As mentioned earlier, Honda charges for it after five years or so. In contrast, updates are free on my portable device.

Subaru

I just received my "update" for my Legacy. It was $118. It's a joke. I looked up some locations. They list stores that went out of business years ago. The buildings are empty. In fact I'm not seeing much of anything new after 21 months of ownership. Restaurants that changed hands have both brands shown at the exact same address. I got so tired of waiting for them to update the maps I went out and bought a Garmin GPS. Both the graphics and features of the Garmin make my expensive built in system look like a 5 year old and a box of crayons. I sent them an email and I'm awaiting their response.

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