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GPX vs. CSV

 

Given a choice for downloading, what are the pro's and con's for each format for POI files?

Is there any reason why CSV POI files aren't also posted as GPX?

They both work

dkstl wrote:

Given a choice for downloading, what are the pro's and con's for each format for POI files?

Is there any reason why CSV POI files aren't also posted as GPX?

Quick and dirty answer is that the gpx format can hold more inf. As to why you don't see both is that it's the maintainers choice. My files are csv because they do not hold a lot of extra info. All I have in mine are latitude, longitude, name, and address with a phone number. The 1 gpx file I have has not been updated but the csv has.

--
Nuvi 650 and 1350.

So

So, if you want to have the most info on your GPS POIs you should load the GPX files when available?????

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ChefDon

Not necessarily

ChefDon16 wrote:

So, if you want to have the most info on your GPS POIs you should load the GPX files when available?????

Take for instance the Diner's Drive-Ins and Dives (GPX format) it contains the lat/long, the name of the restaurant and the complete address, compare that to the Triple D Plus.csv it contains the Lat/long, the name of the restaurant, the complete address, the food it was prepared for each location, and some locations contain a user review. Those two files feature the same restaurants.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

CSV

ChefDon16 wrote:

So, if you want to have the most info on your GPS POIs you should load the GPX files when available?????

My opinion is that unless one uses the POI file to dial a telephone, the csv files are sufficient; and in many cases, have advantages. They are simpler in nature, easier to construct, and easier to edit.

Except for a FEW GPS units that have a character-count limit, all of the data in MOST gpx files can be entered in field 3 and 4 of a csv file (except, as stated above, when used for phone dialing).

Since I don't use POIs for phone-dialing, I use csv files whenever possible.

RT

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---------------"Internet: Don't believe half of what you read, and verify the other half."---------

it's more than different strokes

There are features available in GPX files that can't be matched in CSV. Perhaps the one difference most cited has to do with phone numbers. Phone numbers in a GPX file can be sent via Bluetooth to a paired phone so the location can be dialed from the GPS.

GPX files also give the creator more control over the formatting and display of data on the screen. You can set both speed and proximity alerts with a GPX so they are enabled automatically. You can only set a speed alert with a CSV from within the file.

As to stuffing a CSV file with all kinds of data in the Comment or fourth field, it only holds so many characters and then things get dropped or truncated. There are fields in a GPX that hold twice if not 4 times the data a CSV can handle without being truncated.

The advantage to CSV is it's quick and easy. You only have 4 entries for every line, Longitude, Latitude, POI Name and Comment or Description. With a GPX each field has to be defined within a strict convention following the XML protocols.

--
"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

More on POI Files

That's true to some extent, but:
1. CSV files can also be programmed to contain alerts, either by info within the file or in the file name; or by using the 'TourGuide' option. The Red Light POI file is CSV ... it has alerts.
2. CSV files can also be formatted by using linebreaks.
3. Field 4 of a CSV file isn't the only field that can contain data; field 3 can also be used for data if one feels there already is too much in field 4.
4. In most POI files that contain 'bunches of data', be it CSV or GPX, most of the data is unused. We all do what we're supposed to do, right? We don't scroll while driving, thereby only using what is displayed on the first 'page'.
5. One of the most popular POI files, if not the most popular POI file, is MrKenFL's "Rest Areas Combined" at:
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/6643
It has all the data necessary, can be easily viewed without much … if any scrolling, and is exceptionally accurate. It's a CSV file.

Everyone agreeing on 'which is best' will never happen, just like everyone agreeing on 'whether Chevy or Ford is best' will never happen! Like I said before, unless one is using the POI for phone dialing, MOST POI files will provide all that is necessary in the CSV format; and it's much easier to work with.

RT

--
---------------"Internet: Don't believe half of what you read, and verify the other half."---------

GPX for me

In my GPX restaurant files, I put in additional data such as specialties, friendly to special dietary restrictions, hours of operation, etc.

In my horse trail files, I put in if you can bring your own horse, operating hours, terrain particulars, etc.

For the csv files I get from the factory, I convert it to gpx and put in global proximities and speed limits, then use Express mode to load them much faster.

And, BTW, Ford is better!! cool

--
NUVI40 Kingsport TN

*|*

David King wrote:

And, BTW, Ford is better!

Nah

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

i agree with most of what you say

retiredtechnician wrote:

That's true to some extent, but:
1. CSV files can also be programmed to contain alerts, either by info within the file or in the file name; or by using the 'TourGuide' option. The Red Light POI file is CSV ... it has alerts.

Tourguide defaults to a quarter mile or approximately 400 meters. In order to set a different value, you need to run POILoader in manual mode and set the distance to some other value.

retiredtechnician wrote:

2. CSV files can also be formatted by using linebreaks.

Never stated they couldn't be formatted using line breaks but with a GPX I can force information to be displayed on the initial or 'GO TO' page.

retiredtechnician wrote:

3. Field 4 of a CSV file isn't the only field that can contain data; field 3 can also be used for data if one feels there already is too much in field 4.

Field 3, the POI Name field usually truncates data after about 20 characters so you can't have multiple lines. But then that's a limitation of the GPS so the limit is there for both formats.

retiredtechnician wrote:

4. In most POI files that contain 'bunches of data', be it CSV or GPX, most of the data is unused. We all do what we're supposed to do, right? We don't scroll while driving, thereby only using what is displayed on the first 'page'.

Define "unused." If by "unused' you mean it is displayed on a second page, that's true. Some units allow the pages to be scrolled with voice commands, but again that's unit dependent. The same formatting commands affecting how the data is displayed on the screen are available to both GPX and CSV if you are speaking of drawing lines, bulleting information, indents, colors and the like. What can't be controlled in a CSV is taking something such as if a store such as Wal-Mart has fuel and setting a different proximity for those locations than for those that don't.

retiredtechnician wrote:

5. One of the most popular POI files, if not the most popular POI file, is MrKenFL's "Rest Areas Combined" at:
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/6643
It has all the data necessary, can be easily viewed without much … if any scrolling, and is exceptionally accurate. It's a CSV file.

Rest Areas is a very simple file and it is true that a CSV format works extremely well for this file. However, what can't be done is setting the proximity within the file with this format. Every time POILoader is run, the distance has to be entered using the manual mode. It's also a very simple file to read into a program such as EPE and use it to set the desired distance, save in GPX format and then run POILoader in Auto until the next time the file itself changes. Red light cameras are like Tourguides in they use a keyword to default to a 1/4 mile distance but that's often unacceptable in cities where there may be multiple cameras. You can treat them the same as rest area alerts in that converting to GPX you set a more reasonable distance allowing the value to be built into the file. Speed cameras are different in that they use the @ symbol before a value to set the alert. All fine and well as long as you have a value but not all cameras listed have a value. So both of us are editing the file to set a default value for those locations lacking a speed.

Perhaps the biggest difference between the way we use our files is I do convert all my files needing a proximity alert to GPX and making it part of the file. This allows me to connect my GPS to the computer, invoke POILoader and let it run in the auto mode. I load about 175,000 POI in less than 2 minutes from selecting POILoader to receiving the congratulations screen.

retiredtechnician wrote:

Everyone agreeing on 'which is best' will never happen, just like everyone agreeing on 'whether Chevy or Ford is best' will never happen! Like I said before, unless one is using the POI for phone dialing, MOST POI files will provide all that is necessary in the CSV format; and it's much easier to work with.

RT

What's best is whatever is needed in your particular situation and the way you choose to customize your unit and its POI. For me, a combination of formats works best.

--
"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

Proximity alerts

If you set a proximity or speed alert using manual mode and the file has one imbedded in it, which one does the unit use, or do you end up getting two alerts?

--
ChefDon

Check the POILoader Help file

ChefDon16 wrote:

If you set a proximity or speed alert using manual mode and the file has one imbedded in it, which one does the unit use, or do you end up getting two alerts?

Alerts settings have a priority which is covered in the help file for POILoader. An alert within a file takes precedence followed by a value entered into POILoader. A value in the file name is only used if one of the others in not present.

--
"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

CSV & TourGuides

dkstl wrote:

Given a choice for downloading, what are the pro's and con's for each format for POI files?

I download the CSV file then edit out the locations I do not want, such as Hawaii and Alaska and save the file. Then I open EPE and load that edited file.
I can globally set the alert distance, then open the location in my home town and change that alert to one foot. Then save as a TourGuide in GPX. All my files are loaded with POI Loader in the express mode.

--
1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

GPX fpr me

Given a choice I'll take the .gpx file every time.

--
GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

Thanks

Box Car wrote:
ChefDon16 wrote:

If you set a proximity or speed alert using manual mode and the file has one imbedded in it, which one does the unit use, or do you end up getting two alerts?

Alerts settings have a priority which is covered in the help file for POILoader. An alert within a file takes precedence followed by a value entered into POILoader. A value in the file name is only used if one of the others in not present.

Thanks Box Car.....I'm still in the learning curve and had forgotten to check the help file. Thanks for your patience, support and information. You are great!

--
ChefDon

Why Historic Ships Went GPX

In the discussion thread for Historic Ships of the United States and Canada I was asked to make a CSV version of the GPX file that I have had available for over two years now. The person who asked was told that CSV wasn't going to happen, and here is why.

When Historic Ships began, it was a simple CSV list that had nothing more than the coordinates, the ship's name and its type. I ran with CSV for versions 1.0.0 through 1.4.0. For the next version I wanted to actually provide some background information on the ships themselves, so that the users would have an idea of the ship's history. After all, this is a historic ships file, and having no history in it makes it rather dull.

Testing began on version 1.5.0 in CSV format, and I attempted to add all of the following pieces of information for each ship in the file: telephone numbers, email addresses, NRHP and NHL designations, restoration comments, and background information. However, CSV's four fields proved to be too limiting, as the fourth field would, without fail, truncate the information I wanted to add. Since I thought it important that potential users of the file know a brief history of the ship they selected, I had to switch to GPX as only GPX would properly display all the added information without truncating it. The rest was...history. Version 1.5.0 (CSV) became version 2.0.0 (GPX), and has had some 16 "point" releases since then.

GPX is far superior to CSV simply for the amount of information that it can include without difficulty. However, the decision to use GPX or CSV is dependent on the amount of information included within. As I describe above, Historic Ships had to go GPX in order to include all the information I wanted in it. However, Historic Ships is the exception rather than the rule, as most of the POI files on the site don't require more than the four fields CSV provides.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

ANother good example is

Chicago Area Rail Junctions. THe maintainer explains what type of rail traffic to expect as well as where to park to view the trains. No need to do more research. Just like your ship file.

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

you are so darn smart, i am envious

I am having a hard time figuring out with what and how to open gpx. I would love all in I can get.
we have decided due to poverty to live full time in the rv and travel. so any information that might help us is great. Thanks for posting.. I am trying to learn as fast as I can.. bev

both are

kbhuffman wrote:

I am having a hard time figuring out with what and how to open gpx.

Both types of files can be opened with a text editor but Excel or another spreadsheet program is better for CSV files as it arranges the data into rows and columns.

For GPX files, there are several options and it will depend somewhat on your computer. Perhaps the best all around editor available is TurboCCC's Extra POI Editor. Once you get it installed and play around with it a little you can begin to see just how powerful an editor it is. For just displaying the data inside a GPX in a formatted manner, the Windows editor XML Notepad 2007 is good. There are other editors available on the web, one that used to be popular is Geepeeex. I've also heard of EasyGPX but I don't have any experience with those two programs.

--
"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

Welcome

kbhuffman wrote:

I am having a hard time figuring out with what and how to open gpx. I would love all in I can get.
we have decided due to poverty to live full time in the rv and travel. so any information that might help us is great. Thanks for posting.. I am trying to learn as fast as I can.. bev

Welcome to the site.

Since you are new, you may want to do a couple of the Beginner Exercises.

To make it easy, when you click on the first link below, hold down the "Cntl" key as you left-click. That will open a new "Tab" in your browser in the "Tab" bar. Click on that 'Tab" to do the first exercise - leaving the "Tab" you are now reading open and available to click on and return here.

The first link makes sure settings on your computer are such that you can do more advanced POI loading.
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/30393

This next link helps you get a backup by attaching your GPS to your computer. (NEVER do anything to your GPS until you have a backup)
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/30394

I am a great fan of EPE. As a matter of fact, I have my computer set to open both .csv and .gpx files when I left-double-click on them.

EPE can be found at
http://turboccc.wikispaces.com/Extra_POI_Editor#toc5

Once you download the program, I suggest that you take the time to go back and download and install the help files for EPE. TurboCC has done a good job on them.

Then go to a FAQ by Box Car and learn how to set up the preferences.

As Box Car has suggested, take the time to play around with it a bit. You will find that you will have a powerful tool at your disposal.

CSV files

Can CSV files be loaded in Microsoft Street and Trips?

--
Even a blind hog finds an acorn occasionally.

Yes

Yes, it is done through Data - Import Data Wizard in S&T.

Personally I find it easier to load the CSV file in Turbocc's Extra POI Editor and SAVE AS a GPX file. The GPX file can be loaded in S&T 2011 or 2013 directly via Data - Import GPX File

--
Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD and TomTom XXL540s

CSV Files

Thanks for the reply. A friend has the s&t on a laptop and wasn't sure if it could be done diretly from the csv. At least i know he has that option.

Thanks again
S.B.

--
Even a blind hog finds an acorn occasionally.

CSV for me

spokybob wrote:
dkstl wrote:

Given a choice for downloading, what are the pro's and con's for each format for POI files?

I download the CSV file then edit out the locations I do not want, such as Hawaii and Alaska and save the file. Then I open EPE and load that edited file.
I can globally set the alert distance, then open the location in my home town and change that alert to one foot. Then save as a TourGuide in GPX. All my files are loaded with POI Loader in the express mode.

Ever since I can load CSV file as TourGuide, I have given up using GPX. It's too much trouble.

I maintain and use both types of files,

but I favour gpx because I can attach a picture to the entry. Just my 2c

Oh, and by the way there have been several excellent, informative posts.

Good point

I do have pics in my FamilyTourGuide file and my Illinois CourtHouseTourGuide file.

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

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