GPS devices after April 6th???

 

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

--
John from PA

John from PA wrote:See

John from PA wrote:

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

Should be good to go. The last week count rollover was 22 August 1999.

See also this earlier thread:
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/48717

hummm

Quote:

Any GPS device manufactured after 2010 should be fine as long as it conforms to the ICD-200/IS-GPS-200 specification. Thankfully, we won't have to face this problem again as modern GPS navigation systems including CNAV and MNAV use a 13-bit week number, meaning a reset won't be required before we don't care about GPS anymore, or have all moved to Mars.

For now, if there are some old GPS devices you still rely on, check to see if they can be patched and whether a patch has been released. If one hasn't, and the manufacturer is remaining silent on the subject, don't be surprised if you device starts acting strangely in April.

My Zumo's were made before 2010, My Nuvi's came out on 2011. I have to hope Garmin provides the patch they talk about in the article for the Zumos.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

John from PA wrote: See

John from PA wrote:

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

In August 2018, I emailed Garmin about the 4/6/19 rollover and received the following response:

"Hello

No, it does not look like there will be any problem with the Garmin devices with the 1024 week rollover in 2019.

Thank you for choosing Garmin,

Isaac
Product Support - Map Update Team
Garmin International

For 24-hour access to support videos, manuals, FAQs & more, visit the Support Center."

No specific units nor unit age was mentioned. I suspect those here with older units will have something to post on this come April.

Sounds like...

...Garmin has got it covered.

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

Again

Just as 1999 to 2000 was! A non-event.

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

I getta kick out of...

John from PA wrote:

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

Slightly off topic:
I get a kick out of the first sentence in the article: "Remember the Y2K bug?." Of course it wasn't a bug. It was a happening and the world had at least 10 years to prepare for it.
I was an IBM mainframe consultant during that time and I had the 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. watch. My company offered free worldwide telephone support to help anyone needing assistance. Know what? I got exactly one call all night and that was from some guy in Austria who wanted to practice his English. The reason the world didn't crash was because Y2K was taken deadly seriously. It was a-comin' and the world had to prepare for it and did.

Phil

--
Phil in Mentor, Ohio -- Garmin Nuvi 1450

Should be OK

My units came out after 2010 so i should be OK

ancient Magellan had trouble

My very first GPS unit was a gigantic Magellan device I purchased late in 1991. By current standards it was very primitive, with very few features, poor battery life, and terrible satellite tracking in adverse conditions. But I had a barrel of fun with it.

By 1999 I had moved on to a Garmin GPS III which was better in every conceivable way. That included handling the rollover properly. That particular Garmin had no trouble, but that Magellan was toast.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Similar Situation

plunder wrote:
John from PA wrote:

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

Slightly off topic:
I get a kick out of the first sentence in the article: "Remember the Y2K bug?." Of course it wasn't a bug. It was a happening and the world had at least 10 years to prepare for it.
I was an IBM mainframe consultant during that time and I had the 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. watch. My company offered free worldwide telephone support to help anyone needing assistance. Know what? I got exactly one call all night and that was from some guy in Austria who wanted to practice his English. The reason the world didn't crash was because Y2K was taken deadly seriously. It was a-comin' and the world had to prepare for it and did.

Phil

I was a Verizon telecom engineer during the Y2K scare. There was a fear within the telecom industry, not generally known by the pubilc, that there would be massive communication failures. I was called in to work from 8PM to 8AM to monitor network systems. There was only one internal system failure which did not affect the public. It was back online by 12:15 AM.

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was working on a military avionics box. It had no calendar and absolutely no concept of dates. We had to certify that when Jan 1 2000 arrived the box would not have a date issue. So we had to certify a box without a calendar would not have have a calendar issue WHEN a date arrived that was already long PAST before the contract was signed. Not a problem.

My Nuvi 660

This could get interesting. I purchased my 660 on Feb 11, 2008.

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

Thanks

for the update

--
2597 Sometimes I wonder..."Why is that Frisbee getting bigger?"...and then, it hits me.

Sounds like the typical Govt BS. Our tax $$ at work.

zeaflal wrote:

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was working on a military avionics box. It had no calendar and absolutely no concept of dates. We had to certify that when Jan 1 2000 arrived the box would not have a date issue. So we had to certify a box without a calendar would not have have a calendar issue WHEN a date arrived that was already long PAST before the contract was signed. Not a problem.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

paper map

I still keep my paper map. I know I could use it some day.

Elevators

zeaflal wrote:

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was working on a military avionics box. It had no calendar and absolutely no concept of dates. We had to certify that when Jan 1 2000 arrived the box would not have a date issue. So we had to certify a box without a calendar would not have have a calendar issue WHEN a date arrived that was already long PAST before the contract was signed. Not a problem.

Though it was before 1/1/2000 I had the same problem explaining to numerous customers that their elevators didn't care about y2k. For probably 2 years prior I routinely set the date and time to 5 minutes before y2k so they could watch midnight pass and the elevators just kept on running.

I do have a very old Lowrance hand held GPS, no maps involved, that I haven't fired up in years. I might fire it up on 4/6 just to see what happens, if it even Powers up any more.

Added-
Just pulled the old Lowrance out of storage. It's a GlobalNav 212 with a Rockwell 12 parallel receiver. It can save a big 4 plot trails and 2000 Position Points ( POIs). It looks like it's from about 1997.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

Ancient Lowrance

Still have one which only gave you lat/Lon and you had to figure out where you were.
I used it in the late 80's plugged into an old laptop running a chart program called "Fugawi" which was actually able to show me on a chart where my sailboat was.

Nobody ever confirmed it, but the thought was the name Fugawi came from "Where the Fug a wi"!

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

Old GlobalNav

I connected it to a laptop once or twice on trips in the car, don't remember what map program I was using.

I use to travel the northeast U.S. down through Kentucky. Mostly use to pull the lat/long for exits and turns off a paper map and enter them as POIs so I'd know when I was getting near my turn, as the crow flys. I remember the first time I saw a GPS with maps advertised, I had to have it.

Anyway, grabbed 4 new double AAs and fired up the GlobalNav. It asked what state I was in to speed up locating satellites but it only took 10 minutes. It still has all my old POIs and trails in it. It tracked me great on a short trip this evening. Now I can see what it does on 4/6.

Update
I did send an email to Lowrance asking about the GlobalNav 212 but I don't expect any problems. The last time the date week rolled over was in 1999. The GlobalNav was manufactured prior to that. So it has already been through this once.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was

zeaflal wrote:

Back in 2002 or 2003 I was working on a military avionics box. It had no calendar and absolutely no concept of dates. We had to certify that when Jan 1 2000 arrived the box would not have a date issue. So we had to certify a box without a calendar would not have have a calendar issue WHEN a date arrived that was already long PAST before the contract was signed. Not a problem.

To *really* foul things up, you need computers + the government + the military.

--
"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

My guess

bear007 wrote:

I connected it to a laptop once or twice on trips in the car, don't remember what map program I was using.

is you were using Microsoft Streets&Trips or similar in those days.

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

My Old slow memory

Melaqueman wrote:
bear007 wrote:

I connected it to a laptop once or twice on trips in the car, don't remember what map program I was using.

is you were using Microsoft Streets&Trips or similar in those days.

But that sounds right.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

good

tips. Thanks

Lowrance GlobalNav 212

bear007 wrote:

...

I did send an email to Lowrance asking about the GlobalNav 212 but I don't expect any problems. The last time the date week rolled over was in 1999. The GlobalNav was manufactured prior to that. So it has already been through this once.

Lowrance Tech Support Answer

Hi,

I don't think this unit would be affected, but we do not have a software update for it.

Thank you for choosing Navico products

Doesn't sound like tech support is quite sure what they want to say. I already knew there were no updates for this unit nor do I expect it to have a problem. I guess I'll know for sure on 4/6.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

Lowrance GlobalNav 212

bear007 wrote:

...

I did send an email to Lowrance asking about the GlobalNav 212 but I don't expect any problems. The last time the date week rolled over was in 1999. The GlobalNav was manufactured prior to that. So it has already been through this once.

Lowrance Tech Support Answer

Hi,

I don't think this unit would be affected, but we do not have a software update for it.

Thank you for choosing Navico products

Doesn't sound like tech support is quite sure what they want to say. I already knew there were no updates for this unit nor do I expect it to have a problem. I guess I'll know for sure on 4/6.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

It Depends

John from PA wrote:

See https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-....

Does anyone have a feel for how the common OEM's (Garmin, TomTom, etc) of GPS units may be handling this?

TomTom has said that newer units are not affected, but older units may have an issue if the navcore software has not been updated to Version 9.541. If your device is on the list and has software earlier than 9.541, you should update it to avoid a problem.

They put out the list below of potentially affected devices. (Pay attention when you read it, as in their marketing wisdom TomTom has reused the device names from some of their earlier devices and there is said to be no problem with the ones introduced in the last 5-6 years that reuse the old names.)

The list of devices that may have issues is as follows:

Products affected:

Navigation devices
-------------------------
TomTom GO
TomTom GO 950 LIVE
TomTom GO 950
TomTom GO 750 LIVE
TomTom GO 750
TomTom GO 550 LIVE
TomTom GO 940 LIVE
TomTom GO 740 LIVE
TomTom GO 650 LIVE
TomTom GO 540 LIVE
TomTom GO 930
TomTom GO 730
TomTom GO 630
TomTom GO 530
TomTom GO 920
TomTom GO 720
TomTom GO 520
TomTom GO 910
TomTom GO 710
TomTom GO 510
TomTom GO 700
TomTom GO 500 (2005)
TomTom GO 300
TomTom GO
TomTom Start
TomTom Start ² / Start Classic
TomTom Start
TomTom ONE
TomTom ONE XL
TomTom ONE IQ Routes
TomTom ONE 30 Series
TomTom ONE 3rd Edition
TomTom ONE 2nd Edition
TomTom ONE 1st Edition
TomTom XL / XXL
TomTom XXL IQ Routes / XXL Classic
TomTom XL LIVE IQ Routes
TomTom XL IQ Routes ² / XL Classic
TomTom XL IQ Routes
TomTom XL 30 Series

Built-in Navigation
--------------------------
Blue&Me - TomTom
Carminat TomTom
Carminat TomTom LIVE
Carminat TomTom Z.E. LIVE
TomTom Mazda Navigation (NVA-SD8110)(LIVE)
TomTom Mazda Navigation System NB1 LIVE

- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

Interesting

I’m curious to know how much was spent on the Y2K support... billions or trillions?
I assume almost every company had committee or team supporting this.

My nuvi 2597 is all right.

The majority of Garmin GPS owners should be OK as well, I'd think.

--
Garmin nuvi 2597MT, 660, too many really.

Way back in Dec 1999, I was

Way back in Dec 1999, I was working for FOX in Chicago at the time.... They were positively paranoid that everything would stop working... I was Kept on Overtime for 18-20 hours that day, also doing a New Year's Party.....
I carried two cellphones: one from Management, so that in case something drastic happened, they could contact me directly....

Nothing Happened....

--
A 2689LMT in both our cars that we love... and a Nuvi 660 with Lifetime Maps that we have had literally forever.... And a 2011 Ford Escape with Nav System that is totally ignored!

Close

Melaqueman wrote:

Still have one which only gave you lat/Lon and you had to figure out where you were.
I used it in the late 80's plugged into an old laptop running a chart program called "Fugawi" which was actually able to show me on a chart where my sailboat was.

Nobody ever confirmed it, but the thought was the name Fugawi came from "Where the Fug a wi"!

It was named from a native American Indian tribe that kept getting lost...

twisted

--
Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

2000 bug

the 2000 bug,
was never going to happen, 1 Jan 2000
the year is not stored as a 2 digit number, it is stored as a two digit number added to a base date 1980
If you pull the cmos battery out of an old pc the hardware date is 1/1/1980.
overrun is still possible to occur in those aged pc-s,
if they are still running,

2079 dec 31 23:59:59 + 1 second

--
If only ..

Garmin Nuvi 765T Dec 2009

Purchased Dec 9, 2009

Patched?

--
rvOutrider

I dsagree

almostbob wrote:

the 2000 bug,
was never going to happen, 1 Jan 2000
the year is not stored as a 2 digit number, it is stored as a two digit number added to a base date 1980
If you pull the cmos battery out of an old pc the hardware date is 1/1/1980.
overrun is still possible to occur in those aged pc-s,
if they are still running,

2079 dec 31 23:59:59 + 1 second

Most code was optimized as tightly as possible and the date in the code was indeed going to be a big problem with Y2K. Massive coding time was spent preparing for the event which is why it became a non-event.

--
GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

so true

thrak wrote:

Massive coding time was spent preparing for the event which is why it became a non-event.

And the coding time was the visible part of the iceberg. In many places, there was a massive bureaucratic overhead and proceduralized checking which consumed resources far greater than the coding.

Possibly some scoffers might usefully suggest the desired result could have been reached with considerably less resources. But the scoffers who assert it was never going to be a problem anyway are just ignorant.

I, personally, spent the first week after the turn of the century largely on helping people with secondary Y2K problems. The official systems had been successfully cleaned up in advance. The bugs were not my own. So far as I know, I only ever wrote one Y2K bug, and I realized it and fixed it months before the event. My particular one was actually a once every decade bug.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Fun times

I personally wrote code for a large mainframe public hospital system that had computerized ALL it's old patient records.

The patient birth dates were stored as a 2 digit year. Then someone realized in the late 90's that patient records contained people that had been seen that were born in 1899, or earlier. Yes most were probably deceased at the time, but every record had to be scoured and fixed. Whoever wrote the original code must have thought they were saving key strokes for the person entering the original information.

Still, questionable records had to be eye-balled to make sure some baby's birth record was not mis-fixed and the baby would show being a hundred years old at birth. JCAH would have had fun examing those records.

--
I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

Keystrokes were not the issue.

KenSny wrote:

I personally wrote code for a large mainframe public hospital system that had computerized ALL it's old patient records.

The patient birth dates were stored as a 2 digit year. Then someone realized in the late 90's that patient records contained people that had been seen that were born in 1899, or earlier. Yes most were probably deceased at the time, but every record had to be scoured and fixed. Whoever wrote the original code must have thought they were saving key strokes for the person entering the original information.

I don't think the primary motive for the two-digit years was saving keystrokes. Except for the really, really high-end hardware, code written back in the 1950s and early 60s was being run on machines where the typical memory capacity was perhaps 4 kilobytes - and often less. Two-digit dates saved precious memory space, and no one was even considering the possibility of the same software still being used 40-50 years later.

To put the hardware into perspective, the HP pocket calculator I bought for myself in 1974 had the capacity for a larger program (more lines of code) than the refrigerator-size Bendix computer for which I wrote code in 1962 - working on the Apollo program.

- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

funny ...

-et- wrote:

~snip~

To put the hardware into perspective, the HP pocket calculator I bought for myself in 1974 had the capacity for a larger program (more lines of code) than the refrigerator-size Bendix computer for which I wrote code in 1962 - working on the Apollo program.

- Tom -

I remember my first PC, a Packard Bell, had a 4GB hard drive, the hard drive was the size of a phone book from a big city. Now you can get 128GB on a card the size of a postage stamp. Back then 4GB was hard to use up, today my PC has 7 portable HDs attached each with at least a TB of space, plus two internal 500GB drives.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

MAybe, but

True for some hardware, but this was a large IBM mainframe computer and the code was written in the late 70's.

The problem was not memory as much as runtime. Making sure each nodule (subroutine) was fast and efficient.

When you are paying people to manually key in every letter and digit of a basic identification record to produce a keypunch card then it becomes costly. It wasn't until the mid-80's that the actual records were finally scanned into the computer and then the problems began to come to light.

Computing was different back in the old days, that being the 60's and 70's. Programmers today have no idea what that was like, You had to actually code in both eras to realize it.

It was like being in electronics repair when there was only vacuum tubes and wires, then a push to replace vacuum tubes with transistors, then came printed circuts and chips. A lot of techs just could not adapt.

At any rate, we've gotten off topic, sorry.

--
I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.