What to do in a hailstorm?

 

I need everyone's opinion on this. Help settle an argument between me and my wife.

If you are driving down an interstate at a moderate 80 mph or so and you encounter a hailstorm, do you pull over and wait on the shoulder or just keep going?

And you are not under an overpass or something like that.

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN
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I would agree with my wife

I would agree with my wife grin

This is from an insurance company

Prepare for a Hailstorm

Here's what to do if you drive into a hailstorm:

Stay inside the vehicle. Hail falls at fast speeds, and it can cause injury to those in its path.
Stop driving and pull to a safe place so hail doesn't break the windshield or any windows — driving compounds hail's impact with your car. Stop under an overpass, and don't forget to pull out of traffic lanes and onto a shoulder. Avoid ditches due to possible high-rising water.
Keep your car angled so the hail is hitting the front of your car. Windshields are reinforced to withstand forward driving and pelting objects. Side windows and backglass are not, so they're much more susceptible to breakage.
Lie down, if possible, and keep your back to the windows. If you have a blanket, cover yourself with it to prevent possible debris from hitting you.

--
All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players. Rush

Coward!

hercegovac wrote:

I would agree with my wife grin

Always the safest route, isn't it.

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Agree with

the wife or you will never hear the end of it.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

No way

rthibodaux wrote:

the wife or you will never hear the end of it.

You think that if she is correct that I'm going to tell her?

Were you born last night?

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Survey Sez

I would most certainly pull over and not continue.
Good point from the insurance company to have the windshield face the hail since it provides more protection, I never knew that.

I'm curious what your wife said.
My money says YOU said to keep driving.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT 2 Units

Yeah but....

muell9k wrote:

I would most certainly pull over and not continue.
Good point from the insurance company to have the windshield face the hail since it provides more protection, I never knew that.

But if I'm driving, the windshield IS facing toward the hail. If I'm standing still, it may not be. If the hail was coming from behind, was I supposed to turn around? There was no room to turn.

muell9k wrote:

I'm curious what your wife said.
My money says YOU said to keep driving.

Not saying, but I will not take that bet. redface

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Stand Your Ground

muell9k wrote:

I'm curious what your wife said.
My money says YOU said to keep driving.

David King wrote:

Not saying, but I will not take that bet. redface

Pleading the 5th are we, looks like your wife is monitoring this thread.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT 2 Units

?!

David King wrote:

If you are driving down an interstate at a moderate 80 mph or so...

80 MPH is "moderate"?! shock

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Then again

there is the age old question: If you run in a rain storm do you get more soaked than if you walk?

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Nuvi 2460LMT.

Mythbusters

pwohlrab wrote:

there is the age old question: If you run in a rain storm do you get more soaked than if you walk?

I believe Mythbusters did something like this and found it made no difference.

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Playing it safe

muell9k wrote:

Pleading the 5th are we, looks like your wife is monitoring this thread.

Not that I know of, but it's better to be safe....

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NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Correct!

You've got it correct. Those are the wisest things to do. If you have an option of quickly pulling under protection -take it. Otherwise, protect yourself.

Fred
A Retired NWS Meteorologist

Boss

hercegovac wrote:

I would agree with my wife grin

In my house, I am the Boss. But my wife is the decision maker smile

Stay Safe.

--
Garmin Nuvi 2555 LMT, Street Pilot C340, nuvi 265WT, Mio Moov 300, nuvi 255W, Navigon 2100 (Retired)

stop

David King wrote:

But if I'm driving, the windshield IS facing toward the hail. If I'm standing still, it may not be. If the hail was coming from behind, was I supposed to turn around? There was no room to turn.

The hail is coming down at a certain rate. Driving 80 mph is like driving straight at a fast ball, thus adding an extra 80mph onto the already fast moving ball.

The windshield may be more resistant, but they aren't designed to be driving at 80mph during a hail storm.

Stop and TRY to have the car facing towards the hail, but first and foremost, stop, preferably under an underpass or some form of shelter.

--
Garmin Nuvi 2450

Broken windshield

The windshield is the only window on the car that is replaced by the insurance companies without any penalties on your premium.

--
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!

Not quite true...

Timantide wrote:

The windshield is the only window on the car that is replaced by the insurance companies without any penalties on your premium.

A few years ago my rear window somehow blew out on the PA turnpike from my car, not quite sure how that happened. Of course, it had to be in the middle of winter and at night over 100 miles away from home.

The officer that showed up shortly after I pulled over was rather surprised as well, I'm sure this doesn't happen often. Nothing hit the glass, I'm guessing somehow the seal at the top of the window came loose, and the air passing over the roof worked its way into the car and out it popped. Imagine the shock on the guy driving behind me as the window flew out!

My insurance company covered it without any issues or penalties of any kind.

--
Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

Close call

I was caught in a hail storm last Friday in my motorhome while parked at a relative's house. I immediately retracted the two slide-outs to minimize the exposed area. Just as this happened, my sister-in-law ran over telling us to get in the house. We grabbed the dogs and made it into the house just as all hell broke loose. By the time it was all over, 8 large trees were down in the yard. Everyone was safe, and thankfully no damage to the house or motorhome. Things could have been far worse. As of today, there is still no power, but the motorhome generator is doing its job.

As for the poster's question, we were amazed that people were driving their cars during the height of the storm as were occasionally peeked out a window.

POI for cover....

I was just thinking the other day that a great POI would be public parking garages...in case of a hail storm. It would be nice to know the closest place I could drive to in order to get a roof over my car.

Agree, pull over, less

Agree, pull over, less chance of wrecking vs driving 80mph with hail dropping down.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Am I the exception here ?

kmo wrote:
hercegovac wrote:

I would agree with my wife grin

In my house, I am the Boss. But my wife is the decision maker smile

Stay Safe.

I always have the final word with my wife. And take my tip on how to have it... Repeat after me: "Yes, Dear"

And you may insist even harder by adding "And I LOVE you !"

Believe me, it never failed me. But then again, it's also the naked truth smile

--
Ain't nuthin' never just right to do the things you wanna do when you wanna do them, so you best just go ahead and do them anyway ! (Rancid Crabtree, from Pat F McManus fame)

Settings

David King wrote:
hercegovac wrote:

I would agree with my wife grin

Always the safest route, isn't it.

Yes. I always thought there should be a choice on the navigation menu for it:

Shortest Time
Shortest Distance
What the Wife Says

Hail, hail, the gang's all here...

I'd increase speed to a more moderate rate... say, 90mph.

LOL...

--
"For those who fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."

Having just been caught in the terrible storm that hit>>>

near Reading PA on June 29th at about 4 a.m. ...I pulled over...when it let up I took off and when it started again I was near an underpass...kind of like musical chairs...I beat a lot of others to the spot. I wasn't afraid of driving in it...just afraid the windshiled would break.

--
"You can't get there from here"

Mythbusters

jfossy wrote:

The hail is coming down at a certain rate. Driving 80 mph is like driving straight at a fast ball, thus adding an extra 80mph onto the already fast moving ball.

The Mythbusters tested the following:

Two cars hitting each other head-on, each at 50 mph, cause twice as much damage as one car hitting a stationary wall at 50 mph. They busted it.

It seems the damage is the same with both scenarios.

So, is hitting a hailstone with a moving car the same force as hitting a hailstone in a stopped car? Logic would tell us no, but the Mythbusters say yes.

--
NUVI40 Kingsport TN

.

David King wrote:
jfossy wrote:

The hail is coming down at a certain rate. Driving 80 mph is like driving straight at a fast ball, thus adding an extra 80mph onto the already fast moving ball.

The Mythbusters tested the following:

Two cars hitting each other head-on, each at 50 mph, cause twice as much damage as one car hitting a stationary wall at 50 mph. They busted it.

It seems the damage is the same with both scenarios.

So, is hitting a hailstone with a moving car the same force as hitting a hailstone in a stopped car? Logic would tell us no, but the Mythbusters say yes.

The damage to the two cars may have been the same or similar, but the laws of physics cannot be denied. Two objects in diametrically opposed direction travelling at 50 mph, has the same velocity as one car going 100 mph in a straight line into a solitary object. The velocity of both equations is the same. Differences in materials, the respective cars' crash/crumple designs, the strength of the wall, etc. will have a real-world effect on perceived damage, a la Mythbusters, but the forces at work are what the laws of nature dictates, not syndicated programming. I should know, I took earth science and physics in high school last century. wink)

if you want to drive away--maybe not offer the windshield

d-moo70 wrote:

Keep your car angled so the hail is hitting the front of your car. Windshields are reinforced to withstand forward driving and pelting objects. Side windows and backglass are not, so they're much more susceptible to breakage.

Trying to take it on the windshield may optimize your personal injury prospects, but it is a minus in what comes after. Think about it--wanting to drive home (or at least to succor) and not having a windshield you can see through.

My daughter's Saturn was parked near the largest impact zone for the great Socorro NM hailstorm of October 2004. At her location that meant baseball-sized hail--lots of it. Her Saturn's backglass was indeed broken out, almost completely, and the windshield did not break out, but had so much crazing that she could not see well enough through it for the 1 mile 20 mph drive on back streets to her home--resorting to sticking her head out the side window to see.

I don't currently have access to pictures of my daughter's Saturn that day, but here is the windshield of another Saturn that day--with a less damaged windshield than hers.

http://fusion.dragonfires.net/images/hail/trista/IMG_0299.JP...

Personally, I'd point the backglass at the storm and cower in the shelter of the front seat backs.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Sorry

As far as my insurance co. I didn't mean to say that they would make me pay for it. But would be charged as an accident against mp policy.

--
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!

I say park it

David King wrote:
muell9k wrote:

I would most certainly pull over and not continue.
Good point from the insurance company to have the windshield face the hail since it provides more protection, I never knew that.

But if I'm driving, the windshield IS facing toward the hail. If I'm standing still, it may not be. If the hail was coming from behind, was I supposed to turn around? There was no room to turn.

I like the insurance company advice to pull over. Continuing to drive could amplify the force of impact of hailstones into your vehicle because of your motion (just like when a stone has been kicked up on the highway--it hits your windshield with more force if you are driving towards the stone at 80 mph compared to when you are standing still). Also there's some potential for being rattled by damage to your vehicle, particularly if glass starts to break, and losing control of a car in motion. I say park it!

--
JMoo On

OK, you've convinced me

dagarmin wrote:

Also there's some potential for being rattled by damage to your vehicle, particularly if glass starts to break, and losing control of a car in motion. I say park it!

This is the best answer I've heard. Thanks.

--
NUVI40 Kingsport TN

park it

I'm good with parking until it is over. Don't see the benefit vs risk of pushing through the storm.

--
___________________ Garmin 2455, 855, Oregon 550t

Depends

Seems it would depend on the size of the hailstones. Less than nickel size should be OK to drive in. Baseball size, certainly not. In either case driving 80mph is a real risk. Best bet is to slow down, and if the hailstones become large, to stop.
I was in a hailstorm some years ago where the hailstones were softball size--large enough to kill someone. They did break out the rear window of my rental car.

--
Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

Apples and Oranges

David King wrote:
jfossy wrote:

The hail is coming down at a certain rate. Driving 80 mph is like driving straight at a fast ball, thus adding an extra 80mph onto the already fast moving ball.

The Mythbusters tested the following:

Two cars hitting each other head-on, each at 50 mph, cause twice as much damage as one car hitting a stationary wall at 50 mph. They busted it.

It seems the damage is the same with both scenarios.

So, is hitting a hailstone with a moving car the same force as hitting a hailstone in a stopped car? Logic would tell us no, but the Mythbusters say yes.

The comparison is not valid. When two cars hit each other head-on, there is twice as much energy to be dissipated, but there are two cars to crumple and dissipate that energy, so the energy dissipation per car is the same.

When the hailstones are hitting the windshield of a moving car there is more energy to be dissipated than when the same hailstones are hitting the windshield of a stationary car. However, there is nothing new to crumple to dissipate the higher energy, so there will be more damage to the hailstones and more damage to the windshield.

With best wishes,
- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

From A Retired Meteorologist for the NWS

Depends how large the hail stones are & whether there is an overpass that you can pull under.

If there is one to pull under & you are not slipping uncontrolably - do it. If there is a shelter which the car cannot fit in & it a very short distance, try that.

If the hail stones are very large they can do serious damage to your windshield & you if they hit you, you are limited in your choices. You may be able to proceed very slowly if you can see & don't slip too much. Otherwise, stay there (off the road)& take it. Try to cover yourselves with protection, if you have it.

Most importantly of all. Take photos & send them to me!

Good luck.
Fred

humm?

-et- wrote:

When the hailstones are hitting the windshield of a moving car there is more energy to be dissipated than when the same hailstones are hitting the windshield of a stationary car. However, there is nothing new to crumple to dissipate the higher energy, so there will be more damage to the hailstones and more damage to the windshield.

With best wishes,
- Tom -

OK using that logic if we place the car in reverse we should be able to minimize the damage to windshield... confused

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

OK

-et- wrote:

When the hailstones are hitting the windshield of a moving car there is more energy to be dissipated than when the same hailstones are hitting the windshield of a stationary car. However, there is nothing new to crumple to dissipate the higher energy, so there will be more damage to the hailstones and more damage to the windshield.

That sounds reasonable. Thanks.

--
NUVI40 Kingsport TN

I agree size would be my deciding factor

We get pebble to golf ball out here, but usualy melt as it hits because of temps.

So

archae86 wrote:
d-moo70 wrote:

Keep your car angled so the hail is hitting the front of your car. Windshields are reinforced to withstand forward driving and pelting objects. Side windows and backglass are not, so they're much more susceptible to breakage.

Trying to take it on the windshield may optimize your personal injury prospects, but it is a minus in what comes after. Think about it--wanting to drive home (or at least to succor) and not having a windshield you can see through.

My daughter's Saturn was parked near the largest impact zone for the great Socorro NM hailstorm of October 2004. At her location that meant baseball-sized hail--lots of it. Her Saturn's backglass was indeed broken out, almost completely, and the windshield did not break out, but had so much crazing that she could not see well enough through it for the 1 mile 20 mph drive on back streets to her home--resorting to sticking her head out the side window to see.

I don't currently have access to pictures of my daughter's Saturn that day, but here is the windshield of another Saturn that day--with a less damaged windshield than hers.

http://fusion.dragonfires.net/images/hail/trista/IMG_0299.JP...

Personally, I'd point the backglass at the storm and cower in the shelter of the front seat backs.

So you would protect your own A__ than those in the back seat????

--
All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players. Rush

Speed up

Go fast enough to create a "cone of invincibility" around you by the wall of air you are displacing around the car. GRIN

What do airliners do in a hailstorm???

--
(formerly known as condump) RV 770 LMT-S, Nuvi2797LMT, Nuvi765T

Car wash

spimby wrote:

I was just thinking the other day that a great POI would be public parking garages...in case of a hail storm. It would be nice to know the closest place I could drive to in order to get a roof over my car.

The open bay self car washes make a good quick place to take cover ... especially when you're on a motorcycle.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

airliners

Gastx wrote:

Go fast enough to create a "cone of invincibility" around you by the wall of air you are displacing around the car. GRIN

What do airliners do in a hailstorm???

They get hit. However, since airliners don't fly through thunderstorms, they don't get hit in flight. On the ground is another matter.

Correct, but . . .

flaco wrote:
-et- wrote:

When the hailstones are hitting the windshield of a moving car there is more energy to be dissipated than when the same hailstones are hitting the windshield of a stationary car. However, there is nothing new to crumple to dissipate the higher energy, so there will be more damage to the hailstones and more damage to the windshield.

With best wishes,
- Tom -

OK using that logic if we place the car in reverse we should be able to minimize the damage to windshield... confused

Correct.

Of course you are increasing the damage to the rear window.

There is no such thing as a free lunch . . . smile

With best wishes,
- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

You better had...

David King wrote:
rthibodaux wrote:

the wife or you will never hear the end of it.

You think that if she is correct that I'm going to tell her?

Were you born last night?

Or...you're going to wish you were!

--
"Backward, turn backward, oh time in your flight, make me a child again, just for tonight."

Pulled over on the highway

nuvic320 wrote:

Agree, pull over, less chance of wrecking vs driving 80mph with hail dropping down.

If pulled over on the side of the highway, don't forget the hazard lights should be turned on.

Not True

avandyke wrote:

They get hit. However, since airliners don't fly through thunderstorms, they don't get hit in flight. On the ground is another matter.

I've seen photos of aircraft that have flown through hailstorms. It looks like someone took a baseball bat to the nose and leading edges. Not pretty...

--
The Moose Is Loose! nuvi 760

Commercially Speaking

Just put up your deflector shields!!!!!!

--
Being ALL I can be for HIM! Jesus. Kenwood DNX9980HD Garmin 885t

What!!!

PastorMC wrote:

Just put up your deflector shields!!!!!!

What ??!!

You can't seriously be thinking of diverting power from your photon torpedos!!

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

insurance

Have good insurance.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

the answer is yes......They

the answer is yes......They did that on Mythbusters

run V. walk in the rain

David King wrote:
pwohlrab wrote:

there is the age old question: If you run in a rain storm do you get more soaked than if you walk?

I believe Mythbusters did something like this and found it made no difference.

It's been a while since I saw that one but I think it ended up with you getting wetter if you run 'cause you ended up getting hit with more raindrops. Just my memory of it, though. I use an umbrella.

--
Winston Churchill said, “Americans can always be counted on to do the right thing, after exhausting all other possibilities.”
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