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GPS Alternative Developed By Defense Firm BAE Systems

 

[of interest]

FROM PCWORLD

GPS Alternative Developed By Defense Firm BAE Systems

UK defense firm BAE Systems has developed a new positioning system that uses existing transmissions such as Wi-Fi, TV, radio and mobile phone signals to calculate the user's location to within a few meters.

The technology is being touted as a replacement for current technologies such as GPS, which relies upon a relatively weak satellite signal that is vulnerable to disruption.

Known as Navigation via Signals of Opportunity (NAVSOP), BAE Systems' new system is resistant to hostile interference such as jamming and spoofing, and can learn from signals that are initially unidentified to build a more accurate and reliable fix on its location.

NAVSOP can function in places where GPS is unable to reach, such as dense urban areas and deep inside buildings, and can work in remote parts of the world, such as the Arctic, by picking up signals that include Low-Earth-Orbit satellites and other civilian signals.

It can also be integrated into existing positioning devices to to improve the performance of GPS, according to BAE Systems.

"The potential applications of this technology are already generating huge excitement in both civilian and military circles," said Dr Ramsey Faragher, a principal scientist from BAE Systems Advanced Technology Centre.
Potential military applications include aiding soldiers operating in remote or dense urban areas and providing improved security for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), which could face attempts to disrupt their guidance systems.

It could also have a role to play in civilian domains, where its uses include helping fire and rescue services find their way through smoke filled buildings and enhancing the safety of lone workers and security staff.

Gary Hayman
Garmin Trick & Tips
http://bit.ly/garmin_gps_tricks

--
Garmin nuvi 3790LMT, 755T & 650. Prev. Garmins: GPSIII+, SP 2610, 250W; Magellan 2200T __GARMIN TRICKS WEB SITE __http://bit.ly/garmin_gps_tricks

GPS Alternative Developed By Defense Firm BAE Systems

Gary,

That is a great article! Thank you for posting that. I have dabbled with Navizon in the past http://www.navizon.com/ , which is an application that uses cell phone and wifi data. Actually, I think my Garminfone uses cells signals initially to get a coarse fix on my location, but then gets a better fix with actual satellite data.

Jim NØJS

Thanks

Interesting reading, thanks.

Not too loud...

Lightsquared (or what's left of it) may actually tell all us GPSr owners that we need to buy one of these....

--
Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

Nope.

Jim1348 wrote:

.
.
.
Actually, I think my Garminfone uses cells signals initially to get a coarse fix on my location, but then gets a better fix with actual satellite data.

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Currently have: SP3, GPSMAP 276c, Nuvi 760T, Nuvi 3790LMT, Zumo 660T

Thanks, An interesting

Thanks,
An interesting article!

Rob

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Maps -> Wife -> Garmin 12XL -> StreetPilot 2610 -> Nuvi 660 (blown speaker) -> Nuvi 3790LMT

Wrist watch personal communication

Thank you very much for the terrific article!

I see a Dick Tracy wrist watch communication device on the horizon. Add one of these foldable video screens that are in the works and the only thing missing is the kitchen sink.

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Gotta travel on - SkywayTraveler

NONONONONO

SkywayTraveler wrote:

Thank you very much for the terrific article!

I see a Dick Tracy wrist watch communication device on the horizon. Add one of these foldable video screens that are in the works and the only thing missing is the kitchen sink.

No sink. My wife would want me to do the dishes.

Bite your tongue!

--
NUVI40 Kingsport TN

Used on Ipod?

Jim1348 wrote:

I have dabbled with Navizon in the past http://www.navizon.com/ , which is an application that uses cell phone and wifi data

Wife's Ipod Touch 'Location Services' determines its location via WIFI. Always wondered how that was possible. Do you know if it is using this system?

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-Quest, Nuvi 1390T

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ddeerrff wrote:

Wife's Ipod Touch 'Location Services' determines its location via WIFI. Always wondered how that was possible.

There's a huge database "out there" that has wifi nodes associated with geocoded physical addresses and/or lat/lon coordinates... the wifi location services sees a device using a particular wifi name and IP address, and serves up what the database has for coordinates, and plots it on a the map.

btw... you can add autonomous GPS to an iPod Touch with either a bluetooth GPS puck, or a BadElf device that plugs into the iPod charging port and, with the right app, have a fully functional, stand alone GPS comparable in end user experience to a Garmin Nuvi.

--
*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone5 + Navigon*

Thanks.

kch50428 wrote:

There's a huge database "out there" that has wifi nodes associated with geocoded physical addresses and/or lat/lon coordinates...

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-Quest, Nuvi 1390T

Isn't that what Google has been doing?

Google has been working on this for a while now. That's why they can provide indoor navigation in shopping malls and other similar places. In the process, they have stirred up lots of privacy issues, such as collecting your home wifi signal, and use your cell phone location to aid other people.

opportunistic--

It's an opportunistic system, using whatever is available. Yes, similar to what Apple and Google do, using cell towers, WiFi, and whatever else is around.

Opportunistic systems have their problems, though -- anything in the RF environment changes, and your location is likely to change. How about a large metal reflector entering the signal path? Delivery trucks, or a transit bus downtown? From working with Wi-Fi deployments, things like this can shift signal strength by 20dB or more, and drastically shift multipath.

With indoor situations, a lot of prior planning gets sent down the tubes when Accounting gets in a dozen new metal filing cabinets!

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

Looking forward to more news

Looking forward to more news on this system.

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romanviking

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