Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

 

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33153_7-57421254-10391733/does-...

What are you thoughts after reading the article?

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Yet another variation on the

Yet another variation on the same question that tends to crop up on a regular basis here: "which do you prefer, smartphone or GPS?" My answer hasn't changed. I have both and the standalone GPS is still a better option than the smartphone. So, it still makes sense to purchase a GPS receiver.

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"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

Don't Care For The "Jack Of All Trades" Devices

The GPS apps on the smartphones are pretty handy but for serious navigation I prefer a dedicated device. It's sole purpose is for navigation and nothing else. Like someone else before said, you lose the phone signal you lose the use of the navigation.

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OK.....so where the heck am I?

read my lips!

pkdmslf wrote:

Like someone else before said, you lose the phone signal you lose the use of the navigation.

NO YOU DON'T

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

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flaco wrote:
pkdmslf wrote:

Like someone else before said, you lose the phone signal you lose the use of the navigation.

NO YOU DON'T

That's certainly the case for me. My Samsung Galaxy Nexus has a dedicated GPS receiver that works even when there's no phone signal. However, I'm still going to stick with my trusty TomTom for now.

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My Nexus S has a GPSr as well, but it depends on data to DL maps from Google. At this time, you can't DL free maps to the device.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

yes

Alot of people dont buy smart phones, and the like. Some use Tracfone, and other pay as you go plans. Personally, I believe GPS will be around for a while yet. I still like to use my Garmin so I can create my own routes.

--
Unless you are the lead sled dog, the view never changes. I is retard... every day is Saturday! I still use the Garmin 3590 LMT even tho I upgraded to the Garmin 61 LMT. Bigger screen is not always better in my opinion.

The features . . .

The features of a stand alone GPSr still outweigh those offered by smart phones. When walking about, I tend to use my smart phone for the convenience and use my 3760 for in car use whether it is my car or a rental.

--
JRoz -- DriveSmart 55 & Traffic

I find the standalones are better to deal with on the road

but I don't think I'd pay more than $100 for one.

My ford has SYNC

I just start the directions function of the SYNC system while the phone is connected via Bluetooth and the phone downloads the route to the car SYNC. Then
off I go. For as long as I have owned a gpsr I have never used the screen, I find it useless. For me audio is the way to go.

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

GPS still have a place

I have a cell with GPS and a Garmin. I have only used the cell for a close to home trip when I didn't have my Garmin and it did ok. I guess I am just used to having the Garmin and cell perform separate functions, I still prefer to use the Garmin for my trips

Still Need a GPS

Lets see, in the last two weeks I've gone 35 mile offshore in the Gulf of Mexico on a deep sea grouper fishing trip and I've gone on a airboat photo safari expedition in the deep remote Florida Everglades. No cell phone towers in either place, so yes, I still need my GPS units, auto, marine, and hand held units.

Depends on where you'll use it

As with everything there isn't one size that fits all. Personally, my Nuvi was mothballed since last September when I upgraded my smartphone to an Android and use Waze as my GPS application. No real issues in that time. Since I use a smartphone for a wide range of applications, there is no extra cost for me and traffic reports are free and accurate as well as have constantly updated POI's not subscription based.

GPS

gadget_man wrote:

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33153_7-57421254-10391733/does-...

What are you thoughts after reading the article?

It depends on your lifestyle. If you live and travel in areas where you have constant coverage and you dont rely on getting directions a lot then that ok. For me i constantly need directions and route planning function to optimize my traveling so the GPS is valuable

--
Garmin Nuvi 260W Garmin Nuvi 1490T If you think knowledge is expensive, try ignorance.

At this point a stand alone

At this point a stand alone gps is the best option for navigation. It is however just a matter of time before an app is created that will give smart phone users all the same features as the stand alone gps.

Specialized gps units will be around a while

williston wrote:

My worry is the possiblity that multi-function smart phones will eventually crowd the specialized single function GPS out of the market.

Specialized units are made for cars, aviation, boating, hiking, etc. A smart phone will never replace all the specialized units. The car gps segment should be around for a long time even if it becomes far less of Garmin's business.

New Garmins start immediately

JimD1 wrote:

It is particularly stupid IMHO to have the lawyer screen on startup telling you not to do things while driving and have the startup take several minutes. This seems solvable but nobody seems to be working on it.
Jim

This is solved with the new Garmins. When the unit is first started it does all the standard stuff that takes so long. After that, the following happens:

1. If the unit is plugged in, whenever the power is removed the screen will flash a warning that the unit is entering sleep state giving you time to press the screen to keep it awake if desired. When the power is restored the unit wakes up and is ready to go.

2. If the power button is tapped, the unit enters sleep state immediately. When the power button is tapped again a lock screen appears. Tape the screen twice and the unit is awake and ready to go.

The comparison is similar to the difference between starting a windows computer as compared to just waking it up.

This happens with my 2495LMT. Not sure about all the other current generation nuvis.

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Juggernaut wrote:

My Nexus S has a GPSr as well, but it depends on data to DL maps from Google. At this time, you can't DL free maps to the device.

Correct, google maps needs a data connection to function properly. Thats why you need to purchase an app which stores the maps on your phone. The apps aren't free, but then again neither is a Garmin.

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jrozsnaki wrote:

The features of a stand alone GPSr still outweigh those offered by smart phones.

You really should examine some of the smart phone apps before making this kind of statement. Smart phones apps offer WAY more features than any stand alone PND. Simply go to the android market (google play) and search "gps". You'll be amazed what you find.

You DO NOT need a data plan

You DO NOT need a data plan to use a smart phone.

Many people can buy a used smart phone, use it in Wifi mode only, and download the apps onto it for GPS, and when traveling use the built in GPS with the app for navigation.

It's amazing how misled most people are.

Besides, there are so MANY benefits to having a smart phone with a data plan, such as looking up the closest walmart, gas station, hotel, etc., all of which are updated constantly on the cloud, compared to a GPS which may have outdated files like my GPS units.

Since I started using my smart phones, I have not pulled out my stand alone GPS units in several years.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

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SnookMook wrote:

Lets see, in the last two weeks I've gone 35 mile offshore in the Gulf of Mexico on a deep sea grouper fishing trip and I've gone on a airboat photo safari expedition in the deep remote Florida Everglades. No cell phone towers in either place, so yes, I still need my GPS units, auto, marine, and hand held units.

Why? All you need is an app which stores the maps on your phone and then there's no need for cell towers. Throw on a waterproof case for your phone and you can use it anyplace you want.

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GARYLAP wrote:

At this point a stand alone gps is the best option for navigation. It is however just a matter of time before an app is created that will give smart phone users all the same features as the stand alone gps.

Such apps already exist.

.

Incoorect post ... sorry.

--
Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

You Need to Decide BUT

the unavailability of maps all over the country with phones have been well established. If you are only doing nav in well covered cell areas - no problem. Of course, you don't have to updates maps on phones - they do it for you.

The additional cost of digital services by cell phone operators.

The simplicity of NAV devices to identify & track trips. They're rather inexpensive costs.

For me, those factors will keep me buying GPS's for a long time to come.

Fred

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FZbar wrote:

the unavailability of maps all over the country with phones have been well established. If you are only doing nav in well covered cell areas - no problem.

Fred - please read this entire thread. PLEASE.

The "smartphone/sillyphone" is not free after you purchace it

A Garmin is!

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Windwalker - try reading the post six up from yours! You can buy a used smart phone and use it as a PND without the need of a data plan.

GPS

The cellphone would possibly be more up to date, but for me it is easier to use a dedicated GPS, and I like features like looking for a gas station or restaurant on the way to my destination, and the issue of no cell signal.

because your life may depend on it

GadgetGuy2008 wrote:
SnookMook wrote:

Lets see, in the last two weeks I've gone 35 mile offshore in the Gulf of Mexico on a deep sea grouper fishing trip and I've gone on a airboat photo safari expedition in the deep remote Florida Everglades. No cell phone towers in either place, so yes, I still need my GPS units, auto, marine, and hand held units.

Why? All you need is an app which stores the maps on your phone and then there's no need for cell towers. Throw on a waterproof case for your phone and you can use it anyplace you want.

Ok, so you're in the middle of the gulf stream, in the middle of the night, you haven't seen land in hours, you're headed for an island just a few miles wide, the seas are tossing you about and you're taking some waves over the bow. You're a little busy and want to make sure you find that little speck of an island or you could run aground.

You do that holding your cell phone in a plastic bag trying to keep the car adapter plugged in. I'll use my mounted, waterproof, big screen, nautical chart equipped, marine gps, wired into the ships electrical and data systems.

If you get into trouble out there don't bother calling 911. You're definitely out of range.

Check coverage CAREFULLY

Box Car wrote:

The author doesn't do much traveling. If the author ventured outside the big city he would find large swaths of this country where there is no service. ....

And FYI - The coverage maps from the phone providers are for VOICE service. Data service areas are much smaller.

Most do not have maps

Last Mrk wrote:

After all the discussion on this subject, I can't believe people still think you need a cell phone signal to use the GPS on a smartphone.

iPhones and Android smartphones have GPS built in and if you have GPS software that stores all the maps on the phone, you do not need to rely on a cell or data signal to navigate.

Ah, but therein lies the Catch-22. The vast majority of people using smartphones are just using the 'free' GPS apps that do not contain downloaded maps, so they have nothing without a cellular data signal. My smartphone is a marvelous tool but it is best suited for urban environments. My Nuvi is primary navigator in the auto, and my Etrex is primary navigator on the trails. Smartphone is for backup. Both the Nuvi and Etrex greatly outperform my smartphone for navigation purposes. For data and communication needs, the poor Nuvi and Etrex are complete and utter failures. grin

Triceratops

I guess I'm a dinosaur and don't own a smart phone.

So a stand-alone GPS unit is the way to go for me.

I'll use it to find a repair shop for my 8-Track player. smile

New fangled equipment

ericruby wrote:

I guess I'm a dinosaur and don't own a smart phone.

So a stand-alone GPS unit is the way to go for me.

I'll use it to find a repair shop for my 8-Track player. smile

I don't have the new-age technology such as an 8-track, I'll stick with my gramophone... grin

--
Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

Have one but prefer GPS

shrifty wrote:
ericruby wrote:

I guess I'm a dinosaur and don't own a smart phone.

So a stand-alone GPS unit is the way to go for me.

I'll use it to find a repair shop for my 8-Track player. smile

I don't have the new-age technology such as an 8-track, I'll stick with my gramophone... grin

I figured it was only a matter of time before this thread started getting off track and devolving into bickering over whether smartphone GPS requires data or not. For the record, it depends on the app you use with the smartphone as to whether it needs data or not. Google Navigation requires data. Apps from third parties don't.

While one can purchase a used smartphone if they don't have one laying around and then purchase an app like Copilot or Sygic, what is the point? Using your current smartphone as a GPS? That's a matter of preference but the mention in the article about the GPS chip in smartphones drawing a lot of power is true. What it doesn't mention is that the smartphone may draw more power than the DC adapter can supply. If this happens, the unfortunate user is on battery power and could find his "GPS" dead in the middle of his trip.

I get it. Smartphones are awesome. I actually have Garmin Mobile XT loaded on my old Windows smartphone, and would use it if I had nothing else. In the end however I prefer the device that does one thing well rather than the compromise device that does everything but does nothing well.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

Too many reasons not to

rely on a smart phone for your GPS, as they can loose service, cost more, and use up their battery too quickly. Just one guys opinion.

--
260, 295W, 1490T,2455LMT

My Opinion is

that a phone is use to make phone calls, a GPS is use to get from point A to Point B. I don't see the advantage of combining the two into one unit.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

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Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

What it doesn't mention is that the smartphone may draw more power than the DC adapter can supply. If this happens, the unfortunate user is on battery power and could find his "GPS" dead in the middle of his trip.

And a Nuvi power adapter could also break and then the unfortunate Nuvi user is on battery power and could find his "GPS" dead in the middle of his trip. So what's your point? Anything can happen with electronics, so please don't make silly examples about smartphones when the same thing can happen to PND.

None of the smartphone "advocates" in this thread have told people they should sell their PND and go out and buy a smartphone. We're simply trying to correct the misconceptions and lies that people keep repeating about smartphones.

me

I want to have in-dash navigation system for the cars I am driving. To bad that car makers make lots of profit on it. sad

@GadgetGuy

Really, now you're just picking nits. Did I say anything about a broken power adapter? No I didn't. What I did say is that some smartphones may (not will) draw more power than the DC adapter can output. Naturally not all of them will do this, but there have been documented cases of such a thing happening, which makes the smartphone less useful for the task at hand.

There is another issue that can occur with smartphones: excess heat generated at the dashboard area can (not will) cause the smartphone to spontaneously shut down and bootloop. I have personally had this happen and there are others, all documented, who have had this happen. The only way to resurrect the device at that point is to factory reset it.

GPS receivers do not draw too much power. The firmware in a GPS receiver does not bootloop because it's too hot on the dash. My bringing it up is not silly. However this thread is, since it's the same old s*** rehashed again and again. Each and every time it pops up, you see the same talking heads crowing about smartphones. It gets real old, real fast.

As mentioned previously, I own smartphones. I have encountered problems with smartphones that wouldn't make a dedicated GPS receiver flinch. Don't give me this song and dance that you're trying to correct misconceptions and lies about smartphones because in doing so you are implying that I, a smartphone owner, am lying.

I have a problem with that.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

Standalone GPS

I perfer the standalone GPS, I canot afford a Smartphone and the monthy bill that comes with it.

--
snatcher

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Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

What I did say is that some smartphones may (not will) draw more power than the DC adapter can output. Naturally not all of them will do this, but there have been documented cases of such a thing happening, which makes the smartphone less useful for the task at hand.

Indeed, if you use an undersized power adapter then the phone may not charge. So you should use an adapter which puts out sufficient power!!

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

There is another issue that can occur with smartphones: excess heat generated at the dashboard area can (not will) cause the smartphone to spontaneously shut down and bootloop. I have personally had this happen and there are others, all documented, who have had this happen. The only way to resurrect the device at that point is to factory reset it.

Run a google search for "Nuvi rebooting". Then come back and tell me that a Nuvi can't shut down and bootloop.

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

My bringing it up is not silly. However this thread is, since it's the same old s*** rehashed again and again. Each and every time it pops up, you see the same talking heads crowing about smartphones. It gets real old, real fast.

As mentioned previously, I own smartphones. I have encountered problems with smartphones that wouldn't make a dedicated GPS receiver flinch. Don't give me this song and dance that you're trying to correct misconceptions and lies about smartphones because in doing so you are implying that I, a smartphone owner, am lying.

I have a problem with that.

You say this thread is the same old s*** rehashed again and again. That's because folks keep repeating the same incorrect information again and again and again. I counted fourteen posts in this thread with incorrect statements about smartphones. Not once did YOU chime in to attempt to correct even one of those posts. Why is that????

I like having a dedicated

I like having a dedicated GPS. They're inexpensive and convenient.

I Like Dedicated

I did not read through this entire thread so I am not sure if it has been covered but with capped data plans, one can chew up their monthly data allotment pretty quickly. Plus the standalone device is optimized to do that one task very well. Right now, my iPhone 4S's screen is tinier than my 765T screen and I do not have a dash mount for it.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

After driving over 1.5

After driving over 1.5 million miles in US,Canada
and Mexico, I find it hard to go anywhere and not
use GPS now.
Drove truck for 10 years in 70's and 80's with just
maps and CB. Never got lost but got really confused at times!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Picking up new Motorhome end of month and back to traveling more. Sure makes traveling easier when you just punch some buttons and listen to voice tell you which way to go.
After seeing this country both ways, don't understand why anyone wouldn't want GPS.
I find that bigger screen and verbal directions works better for us older folks that fingers don't work as well on phones.

Yes it dose make sense

I work for a national cell phone company and actually have two high-end smart phones I carry with me every day. Smartphone are great for traveling in that you can find information about a place you are interested as well as keep up with news or anything else that is of interest including email. I especially like reading reviews of hotels and restaurants before deciding where I am going to stay or eat, I’m sure most of us here have stayed in a rat hole and bought meals in dives that would make a Billy goat puke. I’m sure one day smart phones will replace GPS systems or another way to look at it is that GPS systems will be able to access the internet and make phone calls but in reality for me anyway I want a device mounted on my windshield totally committed to getting where I need to go. I want my eyes on the windshield looking for hazards and traffic and not getting distracted trying to figure where I need to turn while looking down at my phone or not having GPS at because someone calls. Being in the cell phone industry I can tell you that data service are not always available even in big cities not to mention if you are on vacation in the middle of the desert in Utah or deep in the Smoky Mountains in TN. And yes it is true you can add maps to smartphones but who do you know who drives around with a GPS system on the seat. Sure you can mount a phone on the windshield but then you back to the basic problem of when a call comes in not to even mention if the call is on the speaker phone it can be very annoying if you don’t want everyone in the car hearing the conversation. For those who do not travel much a smartphone may be just fine and it might be difficult to justify a GPS especially if in their mind they justified the cost of the smartphone based on not having to buy a GPS system but in reality if you think about it even a costly GPS system cost very little if you look at over the life of the unit. I just bought a 2595lmt for just under $300.00 including tax and I fully intend on keeping the unit for at least four years which basically means I am paying about $ 6.00 a month to have a dedicated device on my windshield at all times regardless of what else is going on and it frees up my smartphone to do what it does best. What is really cool is the integration between the two devices, with Bluetooth I have the best of both worlds in that if I am reading about a place I want to visit on my smartphone all I have to do is push a few buttons and the smartphone sends the coordinates right to the GPS without even needing to program the GPS. I also get weather radar, warnings and gas prices as well automatically with very little effort. The real question of this thread is dose it makes sense to have a dedicated GPS device and while it may not for some I believe there are a lot of people who would agree it makes perfect senses.

Well

@Aardvark

If you don't have a dash mount for the iPhone then it's not a good alternative. However they are available and if you depend on the road ahead view on your GPS, then an iPhone is better. The Garmin 765t while in the landscape mode, (the only way it works) has a road ahead display of 2.25 inches. The iPhone while in the portrait mode has a road ahead display of 3 inches giving you more of the road ahead than the 765t.

And the point that using the iPhone as a GPS will use up your data is not correct but you will need to buy GPS software that loads all the maps onto the iPhone such as Garmin USA and TomTom USA.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

No winners or losers

slebkuecher, well thought-out and eloquently stated. I guess we all have our personal preferences and won't change others' minds.

--
"No misfortune is so bad that whining about it won't make it worse."

I don't think the question

I don't think the question is if you should get a smartphone instead of getting a GPS. You have a number of costs involved.

Many people already have a smartphone. The question is if those people should use their smartphone instead of buying a separate GPS unit. You can use a variety of free or near free apps. You can also purchase Garmin or Tom Tom.

An increasing number of people own a smartphone. Those phones are taking the place of calendars/datebooks, MP3 players, GPS and even watches.

Smartphones will store the maps and use the GPS function of the phone. It doesn't have to use much data.

I don't think...

I could live without one now, in fact, I am certain of it.

Now that I am retired, I don't get/make that many calls anymore, but I still travel, and I still need to know where I want to be, and my GPS still does the job for me.

--
"Backward, turn backward, oh time in your flight, make me a child again, just for tonight."

Old Fashioned

Love my 5" GPS with free map updates & traffic with full coverage in the USA and Canada (signal wise)
Did I say 5" screen ?????????????

I have following: (Amortizing cost over 4 years life !)

Dumb Phone - Text, talk, time capability (slow web site capability) $9.45/month for phone,service & use. (I'm not a constant talker - I use maybe 1000 minutes/year). Bluetooth capable. Has camera but not good !

iPad - mapping, plus bunches of other free apps plus Kindle books, Netflix (was a gift), weather capability $9.38/mo

GPS for iPad (XGPS-150) $1.88/mo

5" GPS with LT maps & traffic. Full Junction View.(Bluetooth capable) including SD card. $4.20/mo

Bluetooth necessary as I am a laryngectomee and use speech aid. Short 1 hand to use cell phone in car without bluetooth.

Watch (battery replacement) 0.21/mo

Total of about $25.12/mo amortized !

Pretty inexpensive I think for all that capability .

Edit: Already owned a Canon Digital Rebel before my active GPS time and Smart Phone time.

--
MrKenFL- "Money can't buy you happiness .. But it does bring you a more pleasant form of misery." NUVI 260, Nuvi 1490LMT & Nuvi 2595LMT all with 2014.4 maps !

Cell data is expensive if

Cell data is expensive if you're roaming. I have a number of unlocked phones, ranging from simple to smart phones, so I can always pop in a cheap sim card for calls if I'm traveling, but getting data can be expensive even on sim only deals. I've used my 760 over a fair bit of both North America and Europe and it doesn't cost me a penny in data. For local use I might use the phone data on my plan, for traveling I'll use the 760.

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