new & interesting places for your GPS

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

 

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33153_7-57421254-10391733/does-...

What are you thoughts after reading the article?

Page 1>>

Make Sense

I think that still makes sense to buy a gps because cellphones sometimes don`t have good signal. For many the cost of having navigation on the cell is still too much and when you buy a gps you have a reliable source. I intend to buy another gps for the time being.

I prefer a stand alone GPS

That has already saved me a small fortune by not using a smartphone and the REQUIRED data plan. Sorry, I have a laptop for everything else.

--
Garmin Nuvi 2450

Cell phone GPS

is all well and good, but what if you were in the situation i was in last week. Going From Memphis to Birmingham, no cell signal for most of the trip. Wouldn't do much good if I needed it.

--
Not doing anything worth a darn.

size and signal

Ditto on the cell signal. I traveled with a friend a few weeks ago, and her cell phone based nav system failed when we hit the dead spot. My Garmin worked flawlessly.

There's another issue of my personal preference. I like a larger screen of a stand-alone GPS unit, and I like a smaller size of the smallest smartphone available. I detest the current trend of smartphone getting larger.

--
nüvi 750 & 760

obviously

The author doesn't do much traveling. If the author ventured outside the big city he would find large swaths of this country where there is no service. Now, the cell providers like to state the cover over 95% of the people in this country, but people aren't evenly distributed. They tend to cluster around certain areas and not in others. If people were evenly distributed, there wouldn't be the push on to "bring broadband to the under served and rural areas." That was the whole premise behind LightSquared. They were going to build their network so those people in those "under served and rural areas" would have access to the wonders of wireless communications.

--
Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought. - A. Lincoln

To me a cell phone (Tracphone) is for dialing 911

I laugh at all the I-Pad junkies. I think if they turn the App phones off for a week people would be raining off tall buildings and bridges. Wife and I pay $99 a year for Cells and have thousands of minutes. We only use them when travling and when a business or whatever insists we give them a phone number. If mine is turned on for 5 hours a week, its a lot.

So yes our Garmins will be around a long time!

--
Cain versus Unable 2012

Makes Sense

Cell phone signals alone make GPS worthwhile.

Too expensive

I don't think it makes sense to buy your own GPS (Global Positioning System). They are way too expensive. The system cost was in the billions of dollars. Unless you're Bill Gates, I don't think you want to buy your own. Just use the US Government's. It's free (for now).

Now if you meant a GPS receiver (or GPSr for short), that's a different story grin

I have different receivers for different applications. I have a rugged one made for hiking and biking that I use for caching and mountain biking. I'd never strap my cell phone to the bike. It would get damaged. I have a Garmin for the car. Nice big display and easy to use. I don't have to hold on to it all the time to see where I'm going. Then I'll use the smartphone for other applications. Never a one-size-fits-all.

It does to me

gadget_man wrote:

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?
...
What are you thoughts after reading the article?

It does to me. Just tonight I drove from NE Ohio to a hotel in Charleston, WV, someplace I had not visited before. For the last half hour of the trip, it was raining hard, I-77 was mountainous, and the night pitch black. My Nuvi 1450 took me right to the driveway of the hotel. I can't imagine trying to navigate through those conditions using a telephone. Sorry, I'll keep my stand-alone GPSr.

--
Phil in Mentor, Ohio -- Garmin Nuvi 1450

only an inexpensive one

I would still buy a GPS, but only an inexpensive one and I certainly would not depend on a cell phone.

I certainly don't want the cell phone providers gouging me just to use GPS services on a device that I already paid for. And cell coverage isn't that great in many areas, very likely in some of the same areas that you might want GPS assistance in.

And I personally like a nice small GPS. But if you like the larger (and more expensive) GPS displays, consider a small Android tablet. You don't even need to get one with a data plan, just get one with a built-in GPS and WiFi. You can download maps to it and don't need to keep chipping away at a data plan. Going to Europe or some other area not covered by your GPS? No Problem. And of course it can have a lot more utility than just being a GPS, from web and e-mail access from any hotspot, to providing a camera, stereo mp3 player, even an eBook reader and a lot more.

Depends On The Application

I use a rugged GPSMAP60CSx where I wouldn't even think of using my iPhone.

I still prefer the 60CSx over the iPhone and Navigon.

--
Montana 600, GPSMAP60CSx, fenix, Bad Elf, iPhone 4S, iPad2, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS, MacBookPro, all sorts of maps.

Stand Alone GPS

I still use my stand alone GPS with traffic.

--
Val - Nuvi 785t and Streetpilot C340

After all the discussion

After all the discussion on this subject, I can't believe people still think you need a cell phone signal to use the GPS on a smartphone.

iPhones and Android smartphones have GPS built in and if you have GPS software that stores all the maps on the phone, you do not need to rely on a cell or data signal to navigate.

Not only that, a smartphone not only uses it's GPS for positioning it also uses cell tower triangulation and WiFi to enhance the GPS.

Here's a copy/paste bit of information and explanation how it works on an iPhone. Works the same on Android..

"Garmin -- one of the leaders in GPS satellite navigation systems -- defines GPS, or Global Positioning System, as:

A satellite-based navigation system made up of a network of 24 satellites placed into orbit by the U.S. Department of Defense. GPS was originally intended for military applications, but in the 1980s, the government made the system available for civilian use. . .

GPS satellites circle the earth twice a day in a very precise orbit and transmit signal information to earth. GPS receivers take this information and use triangulation to calculate the user's exact location. Essentially, the GPS receiver compares the time a signal was transmitted by a satellite with the time it was received. The time difference tells the GPS receiver how far away the satellite is. Now, with distance measurements from a few more satellites, the receiver can determine the user's position and display it on the unit's electronic map.

iPhone GPS information.

The iPhone 3G and all subsequently released iPhone models use A-GPS -- or "Assisted GPS" -- which in basic terms accesses an intermediary server when it is not possible to connect directly via satellite -- indoors, for example -- and this server provides the nearest satellite with additional information to make it possible to more accurately determine a users position.

Apple explains that the iPhone 3G and all later models also use "wi-fi hotspots and cellular towers to get the most accurate location fast" when GPS is not the most convenient method of location detection. The iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and iPhone 4S additionally have an integrated digital compass to also provide the direction one is facing, which is quite useful when combined with mapping software."

I'm not sure but do any stand alone GPSr's use assisted GPS which can position you even when a satellite signal is weak or unavailable? like a smartphone can?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

After all the discussion II

Last Mrk wrote:

After all the discussion on this subject, I can't believe people still think you need a cell phone signal to use the GPS on a smartphone.

iPhones and Android smartphones have GPS built in and if you have GPS software that stores all the maps on the phone, you do not need to rely on a cell or data signal to navigate.

I concur this has been discussed ad nauseam but some may be missing the point.

A great number of people here believe that in order to use a smartphone as a navigation devise a cell signal is absolutely necessary, many here know that is not the case; there are apps available that once installed in the smartphone can be used without being connected to a cell tower.

However in order to use a smartphone a data plan is required otherwise it will not be a smartphone and be able to run a navigation app, many here including myself don’t have a need for a smartphone, the main reason is that we don’t want to pay for a data plan and are satisfied with a plain vanilla cell phone and a PND.

The group that already owns a smartphone and have no problem with paying a data plan, using it as a navigation device makes sense rather than also owning a PND.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

stand-alone GPS, stand-alone hammer

The right tool for the job -- a GPS receiver with pre-loaded maps and a readable screen.

And for other tasks, I like my framing hammer -- heavy faceted head and long handle for driving nails.

It's good to know what your tools will and won't do.

Just like I won't use the framing hammer for finish cabinetry, I don't use my iPhone for nav in my car.

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

?

k6rtm wrote:

The right tool for the job -- a GPS receiver with pre-loaded maps and a readable screen.

What do you consider a readable screen

My iPhone with it's retina display and positioned in the portrait mode, has a larger road ahead view and easier to view than my Garmin 760 in landscape mode (the only way I can use it)

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

when one device dies, you get nothing

Talking about always having plan B for everything. I am not really into one device does everything. Because when SxxT happens, I will be completely screwed. I'd rather have multiple devices that have overlapping functions.

Right on Nutella Crepes!

After reading the article, I have to agree with the author's comment about Nutella crepes grin . The rest of his commentary is pointless.

I got a smartphone a while back - and two months later I still have trouble just making a call. The phone may be smart but it's usefullness really depends on the user.

And if you have followed threads on this forum expressing outrage at the cost of a GPSr (lifetime maps, new units with no new features) or privacy concerns (passing information to third parties, targetted advertising, etc.), smartphones magnify those fears one thousand fold!

Other people may use their smartphone as a multifunction tool, and that is fine. But they should not judge me because I primarily use mine as a telephone razz .

What now?

There are many parts of the country where there will be cell phone coverage on the interstate going through an area but you get a mile off the interstate and there is no coverage. So now what do you do if you are trying to route to an address?

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

YES!!!!

Currently on a trip in Arizona and we are using it as we travel around. The phone is ok but you can't use it with the map all the time and the screen is way to small. The phone is fine when you don't have the gps with you. Cell phones are phones....gps's are gps's. Same scenario as using the camera on the cell phone. It does fine in a pinch but not for quality picture taking..of course this is my opinion..

--
Bobby....Garmin 2450LM

Re:>>I'm not sure but do

Re:
>>I'm not sure but do any stand alone GPSr's use assisted GPS which can position you even when a satellite signal is weak or unavailable? like a smartphone can?<<

Not sure about Garmin, but upper end Ford Nav systems use dead reckoning when sat signals are lost or non-existant (such as when in tunnels) to keep you on track. This works quite well on my Dad's Lincoln and the device tracks quite accurately until the sat signal is re-aquired. If it takes an extended time to get the signal back, some error will be seen for your position on the map but it's minor considering the unit is using direction, speed and who-knows-what-else to estimate current position and input it to the map. It's really quite amazing to see in action and had me wondering how it was tracking my position one time in a long tunnel. The details on how it worked in these situations were mentioned in the Nav System owner's manual.

--
"Primum Non Nocere" 2595LMT Clear Channel and Navteq Traffic

Slow Beavis... LOL

slobeavis wrote:

I don't think it makes sense to buy your own GPS (Global Positioning System). They are way too expensive. The system cost was in the billions of dollars. Unless you're Bill Gates, I don't think you want to buy your own. Just use the US Government's. It's free (for now).

Now if you meant a GPS receiver (or GPSr for short), that's a different story grin

Hmmmm... that username seems to really fit. wink

--
"For those who fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."

Yeah!!

I don't mind others switching to use smartphone for THEIR navigation needs.

nice try!

however

Last Mrk wrote:

After all the discussion on this subject, I can't believe people still think you need a cell phone signal to use the GPS on a smartphone.

I'm not aware of any cell phones that will function as both a phone and a GPS display at the same time. I know i can pair my cell with the GPSr and conduct a conversation while the GPS displays navigation information, but I'm not aware of any smartphone that does the same.

Yes, I'm aware that you can get apps for the cell phone that contain all the map data so it's not constantly going out through the network to get the next map segment but, does it need to connect to input a route or can it look up locations such as nearby restaurants or fuel stops without going to the network?

--
Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought. - A. Lincoln

yes

yes

Did you

Don B wrote:

There are many parts of the country where there will be cell phone coverage on the interstate going through an area but you get a mile off the interstate and there is no coverage. So now what do you do if you are trying to route to an address?

This is not true. Did you bother to read my post 6 messages above yours? I'm not trying to argue, just to educate.

Repeat: You do not need cell phone coverage to use the GPS on a smart phone. If you have cell coverage, your phone will use that to enhance your coverage.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

JMHO

Box Car wrote:

I'm not aware of any cell phones that will function as both a phone and a GPS display at the same time. I know i can pair my cell with the GPSr and conduct a conversation while the GPS displays navigation information, but I'm not aware of any smartphone that does the same.

Depends on the carrier I believe. With my iPhone on AT&T (GSM), I can be using the GPS function for routing and carry on a conversation with someone. If I get a call while routing, an alert will pop up asking me if I want to continue with the GPS app or not while using the phone function. Not sure but I don't think you can do the same on Verizon (CDMA).

Box Car wrote:

Yes, I'm aware that you can get apps for the cell phone that contain all the map data so it's not constantly going out through the network to get the next map segment but, does it need to connect to input a route or can it look up locations such as nearby restaurants or fuel stops without going to the network?

The GPS app's I've used, (TomTom USA & Garmin USA) both contain a library of POI's just like their stand alone GPSr's do, but if the destination you want to navigate to is not in the POI library, yes you do need a data connection to use Google etc. to look up that destination on the iPhone. Not finding a location in the POI library happens quite often even on my Garmin 760. When that happens on the 760 I'm out of luck. Not so on my iPhone.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Cell phone signals are not

Cell phone signals are not everywhere and most phone required an active data for GPS anyway.

gadget_man wrote:

Does it still make sense to buy a GPS?

http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33153_7-57421254-10391733/does-...

What are you thoughts after reading the article?

.

Is there any way that this site could require folks to read the entire thread BEFORE they post??

And

follow the links, too

JMHO

NuviHobo wrote:

Cell phone signals are not everywhere and most phone required an active data for GPS

Totally not true! Well at least the part saying you need an active data to use the GPS. Of course that's providing you already made the decision to use a smart phone which carriers do require you to have a data plan.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

bingo

Last Mrk wrote:

Totally not true! Well at least the part saying you need an active data to use the GPS. Of course that's providing you already made the decision to use a smart phone which carriers do require you to have a data plan.

That is what I said about 18 postings before this, if you don't pay for a DATA plan you don't have a smartphone.

Agree with GatgetGuy2008 people are not reading the whole thread before posting.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

Well

That is what I was referring to, the people that insist you need a cell connection to use GPS on a smart phone. Of course if you're using a "dumb phone" you don't have a GPS chip in your cell phone to begin with.

This is what that CNET article was referring to, a smartphone.

And if you're referring to me reading all the posts before commenting rest assured that I have. It's the misinformation posted by people that SMARTPHONES can only use GPS if they have a data connection which by the way can be turned off on the phone if you desire and the GPS will work just fine.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Not you Last Mrk

I was referring to the ones insisting that cell coverage is needed.

In case you don't know some of the newer iPhones 3s and up can be used without cell service or data plan for navigation by internal GPS only, and the iPad as well, I have a 3 that doesn't let me even load the app, I use it as a iTouch.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

Thanks

I kind of figured you were referring to someone else. Thanks for clearing that up.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

I have both gps on cell phone and stand alone GPS

and 99% of the time stand alone beat the Cell phone GPS with signal and faster processing map.

|

Last Mrk wrote:

Of course if you're using a "dumb phone" you don't have a GPS chip in your cell phone to begin with.

Not exactly. FCC rules have mandated ALL cell phones have GPSr chips for E911 compliance for some time now. 'Dumb phones' included.

--
*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone5 + Navigon*

gps are still cheaper in the

gps are still cheaper in the long run, plus they have a bigger screen and they always have a signal. trust me, I use to do deliveries across tx and my cell hardly ever worked between towns.

--
"real achievement in life comes down to three key elements. preparation, timing and execution!" quote by president LBJ

bigger screen...

kingofkings wrote:

gps are still cheaper in the long run, plus they have a bigger screen and they always have a signal. trust me, I use to do deliveries across tx and my cell hardly ever worked between towns.

My wifi iPad with a BadElf GPS receiver and Navigon combine to make one kick butt set-up.

--
*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone5 + Navigon*

My results

dtran1 wrote:

and 99% of the time stand alone beat the Cell phone GPS with signal and faster processing map.

I get just the opposite results. Faster acquisition because the phone uses A-GPS & I often use both because the Garmin 760 is mounted semi permanently in the car & I also have a powered mount for my iPhone mounted into the CD tray on the cars & I can see that the Garmin usually shows a lag between where I'm at and where the GPS shows me when quickly navigating whereas the GPS on the phone is spot on.

Now your results could be different if your GPS has a SIRF chipset. The 760 I use does not.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

acquisition time not an issue with current generation nuvi

Regarding the issue of a smart phone gps acquiring satellites faster than a dedicated unit: I have a semi-permanently mounted, current generation, nuvi 2495LMT which enters a sleep state when not in use. Satellite acquisition time is a non-issue. I just start the car and go. It probably takes about the same time to acquire as would be to remove the smart phone from my pocket, plug it into an adapter and put the unit into a dashboard mount.

read it

Last Mrk wrote:
Don B wrote:

There are many parts of the country where there will be cell phone coverage on the interstate going through an area but you get a mile off the interstate and there is no coverage. So now what do you do if you are trying to route to an address?

This is not true. Did you bother to read my post 6 messages above yours? I'm not trying to argue, just to educate.

Repeat: You do not need cell phone coverage to use the GPS on a smart phone. If you have cell coverage, your phone will use that to enhance your coverage.

I read it but I don't agree with all of it. Like your last comment about a smartphone working when a GPS won't because it lost the satellites. I have been using a GPS for traveling since 2001 and to date have never lost the satellites, even when I had my old Street Pilot III which didn't have anywhere near the sensitivity of today's GPSr. Number one I can buy a new GPS every year for what they want for the data plans, and number two I don't need a smartphone. I use my cell phone to talk to people, what a phone was originally designed to do. Go to the geocaching site and see what the majority of the people think of a smartphone accuracy for geocaching.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

My worry is the possiblity

My worry is the possiblity that multi-function smart phones will eventually crowd the specialized single function GPS out of the market. We will then be left with only a smart-phone based GPS as a choice that may do everything, not necessarily anything real good. Voice quality and durability are terrible on many of them and I can't believe what some people deem acceptable in these areas. In the course of my work, I have been given smart phones in all price ranges, brands and functions. People complain all the time about the quality of the basic voice when I'm talking to them and the glitches, bugs and fragility are amazing for a gadget that can cost up to $700.

I'm just glad I don't have to pay for them myself.

--
"Primum Non Nocere" 2595LMT Clear Channel and Navteq Traffic

Things to improve

I've only used my son's Motorolla Razr as a GPS and it worked well. But the characters on the screen are much too small to be seen readily while driving. I don't think I really understand the way a phone integrates the GPS + phone + music playback functions. I know they can do all that but when my GPSs do that it is nicely integrated. The comments I see make me believe it is not as nicely integrated in the phones today.

I also agree with the comments about the startup screens for GPSs. My son has found locations on his phone much quicker than my GPS would start up. I do not have the latest gps, I want MP3 playback, but my GPSs were all high end models in their day (760, 765, 885). It is particularly stupid IMHO to have the lawyer screen on startup telling you not to do things while driving and have the startup take several minutes. This seems solvable but nobody seems to be working on it. I accept finding the satellite might take a minute or two but why can't I instruct the machine where I want to go before it messes with itself? This kind of flawed logic is exactly the same stupidity that computers seem blessed with. Humans waiting on computers to mess with themselves is just flawed logic.

Jim

GPS unit just makes it

GPS unit just makes it easier to see for these old eyes.

Track logs.

I have been saving all my track logs for many years now. I used GPS Babel to convert all my old Magellan Explorist to GPX. I don't know if any smart phone saves the tracks.

--
1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

There is a app for that!!

spokybob wrote:

I have been saving all my track logs for many years now. I used GPS Babel to convert all my old Magellan Explorist to GPX. I don't know if any smart phone saves the tracks.

Oh, how I hate that saying but yep there is a app called "My Tracks" Works well. I belive Google makes the app and as you guessed, it uses the googl map on your phone. It allows you to record gps tracks and then extract them or just share them with your friends.

--
Bobkz - Garmin Nuvi 2455LMT/C530/C580- "Pain Is Fear Leaving The Body"

JMHO

Don B wrote:

I read it but I don't agree with all of it. Like your last comment about a smartphone working when a GPS won't because it lost the satellites. I have been using a GPS for traveling since 2001 and to date have never lost the satellites, even when I had my old Street Pilot III which didn't have anywhere near the sensitivity of today's GPSr. Number one I can buy a new GPS every year for what they want for the data plans, and number two I don't need a smartphone. I use my cell phone to talk to people, what a phone was originally designed to do. Go to the geocaching site and see what the majority of the people think of a smartphone accuracy for geocaching.

I agree it's not often you lose or can't get a fix with a GPSr, but it has happened to me especially if traveling in a city with large buildings. That will confuse a GPSr because the signal bounces off of the buildings if you can get one at all. Also I've lost signal among tall and dense tree coverage, or even during a heavy storm.

I don't need to see what people that geocache think, right in my car I can compare my iPhone GPS using TomTom USA with my Garmin Nuvi 760 and there is less GPS latency with my phone than there is with my Garmin. I swear.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Keeping my GPS

Don't have a smart phone and most likely will not have one in the future. My Nuvi still gives me excellent service.

--
Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone5

Battery life issues

I can go about 8 - 10 hours on a single charge with my c340, don't believe it is possible on a smart phone. Especially if you are trying to use it at some point during the day.

I have been in a rental or two where the outlets did not work in the car and had to rely on the battery life of the GPS.

--
Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT
Page 1>>

sponsored links