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Geocoding Errors – Insight?

 

Have you ever read a post that badmouths Garmin, POI-Factory workers, or others for publishing inaccurate POI coordinates? Notwithstanding never having been to the POI themselves, how can anyone be off by two miles? I searched for a valid address (mine) on Google Earth and the screen zoomed in on a distant locale in a different city. Curious, I requested the route from there to my address but using a different street name that I had previously seen on Google.

These are my results: a) The Google error calculated out at 47.4 miles and about 52 minutes travel. B) The route directed one to turn onto the street—using the proper name—and travel xx feet to the address using the improper street name. c) Switching to the Google Maps view reflects the correct street name. d) Zooming in to Google Maps street view again shows the street under the wrong name. No wonder incorrect coordinates get posted. At least Garmin has it right.

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"It's not where you start, but where you end up." Where am I and what am I doing in this hand basket?

Errors

Even the web site for the business has it wrong sometimes.I was in Lancaster PA and decided to go to a Best Buy there.Pulled up the Best Buy store locator for the location.Look at the coordinates listed http://stores.bestbuy.com/1197/ they are somewhere in KS. Knowing they didn't look right compared to other locations.Pulled up on Google Earth for the right coordinates.

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Charlie. Nuvi 265 WT,Nuvi 2597 LMT and Garmin Viago.

Google maps.

My experience with Google maps since they dropped Tele Atlas and started using their own maps is that the map accuracy has worsened. I am sure it varies a lot by location. But in geocoding POI's I have found many more errors since the change occurred than I did before.

Also, the past few weeks it seems to me that the performance on the Google maps web site has been awful ... sometimes takes a long time to pull up a map image.

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Alan - Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra

Google Earth

One reason to use Google Earth is that it displays a photo image. If I was geocoding golfnm8's house, I could see the layout of the streets nearby and even whether there is a house there, and decide whether the location is correct.

dobs108

Recently I found

While using my house address on google maps was about three blocks off. Other map websites show my house accurately. I stopped using google maps.

Google directions

An inaccurate private address is one thing, but Google Maps are no better with businesses. I work at an airport. Several times in the past few months people have come to our office to return rental cars. The rental car return locations are on the complete opposite side of the airport. In each case these people had print-outs of directions from Google Maps which clearly directed them to our office rather than the correct location of the car return office.

Accuracy

I find it amazing how much today's technological environment has caused us to expect the precision we see portrayed in the Hollywood movies.

As an ex IT person, I can appreciate how difficult a job it is to first code, and then enter, the pertinent information for location after location after location. And, still, it upsets me when my GPS does not perform with 100% precision.

I think all of us, including myself, need to step back and be amazed at how good it really is.

is it listed?

avandyke wrote:

An inaccurate private address is one thing, but Google Maps are no better with businesses. I work at an airport. Several times in the past few months people have come to our office to return rental cars. The rental car return locations are on the complete opposite side of the airport. In each case these people had print-outs of directions from Google Maps which clearly directed them to our office rather than the correct location of the car return office.

It makes you wonder if you look for your business location on Google is the return location listed or is it just the rental office? Don't blame Google if the return office address isn't listed plainly on the website.

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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

geocoding

Google maps are only as good as the info it receives (garbage in garbage out) and yes addresses can be off by miles, but if everybody knew their coordinates for their addresses life would be easier. Plus add to the fact that Google hasn't street viewed the whole world yet or the sat views aren't that great in some places, then you can understand why some POI files can be inaccurate.

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All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players. Rush

When You Really Want to be "on the money"

When I really want to be on the money I locate the address using google maps. I zoom in from above using the satellite photos. Then I drop down to the street view and look around to make sure I'm where I want to be. Then, using the "send" button on map page I grab the coordinates. I use these coordinates and feed them back into google maps to confirm I've got it right. These are the coordinates I type in to my GPS.

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- Missouri, Garmin 750 &, 255W

precision in the movies

goof up

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

precision in the movies

jgermann wrote:

I find it amazing how much today's technological environment has caused us to expect the precision we see portrayed in the Hollywood movies.

As an ex IT person, I can appreciate how difficult a job it is to first code, and then enter, the pertinent information for location after location after location. And, still, it upsets me when my GPS does not perform with 100% precision.

I think all of us, including myself, need to step back and be amazed at how good it really is.

Speaking of precision in the movies, I have a habit if I'm watching a movie and they give coordinates I jot them down and later check them out on one of my mapping programs. Some coordinates aren't too bad but some are comical. In one movie they gave a pilot coordinates to land in the dry LA river, when I checked the coordinates out it would have put them about ten miles out in the Pacific ocean.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Have you tried the LatLng Marker?

WalkThisWay wrote:

When I really want to be on the money I locate the address using google maps. I zoom in from above using the satellite photos. Then I drop down to the street view and look around to make sure I'm where I want to be. Then, using the "send" button on map page I grab the coordinates. I use these coordinates and feed them back into google maps to confirm I've got it right. These are the coordinates I type in to my GPS.

I wonder if Google Maps LatLng Marker might save you a step or two in this process. Once you've got it enabled, all you have to do is right-click any spot on the map and choose "Drop LatLng Marker" from the context menu. Google Maps pins a little popup with the coordinates to the spot you clicked on. You can even drag your mouse across the popup to copy the coords to the clipboard.

To enable it, click the little green beaker icon in the upper right corner of the page. That will take you to the Google Maps Labs page. There's lots of other things you can experiment with there, but for this, scroll down to LatLng Marker. It's next to last in the list. (There's another one there called LatLng Tooltip, but I find that just gets in the way.) Elick "Enable", then click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page, and you should be all set.

Google Maps has changed

Felix Krull wrote:

I wonder if Google Maps LatLng Marker might save you a step or two in this process. Once you've got it enabled, all you have to do is right-click any spot on the map and choose "Drop LatLng Marker" from the context menu. Google Maps pins a little popup with the coordinates to the spot you clicked on. You can even drag your mouse across the popup to copy the coords to the clipboard.

To enable it, click the little green beaker icon in the upper right corner of the page. That will take you to the Google Maps Labs page. There's lots of other things you can experiment with there, but for this, scroll down to LatLng Marker. It's next to last in the list. (There's another one there called LatLng Tooltip, but I find that just gets in the way.) Elick "Enable", then click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page, and you should be all set.

Your statement is nearly correct.

Google maps runs slightly different now, with Satelite-Hybrid Map view or map view. Zoom in on your location, mouse over poi point, right click for menu, select 'Whats Here', Lat/Log now available four ways.

1) mouse pointer over poi location will pop up co-ordinates.
2) poi location appears on search bar, just copy and paste.
3) there is a history record on bottom left of screen with your recent poi locations.
4) the poi location co-ordinates appear on the firefox browser tab

Regarding Google Maps calculating co-ordinates. I picked a spot behind my home, it gave me co-ordinates for that spot. I'm not sure how it does but it appears to be correct.

Nice new feature.In the past

Nice new feature.In the past I used Google Maps to make custom pois all the time.It went down hill and wouldn't save all the information like it had in the past.Started using Google Earth.I just tried the new feature after signing in and saving a location to my maps.Must say a big improvement.

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Charlie. Nuvi 265 WT,Nuvi 2597 LMT and Garmin Viago.

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