Spoken street names - good or bad?

 

Personally I do not have spoken street names on my 250W and do not miss them at all - but know someone looking at a new unit who is considering the advantages and disadvantages of having spoken street names on whatever they get.

Does anyone with experience of both have views on what is best and why?

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It all comes down to personal preference and what is enough info for you. I was happy with just the warning "ding" tone on my nuvi 350 and never even used the speech capabilities, depite it having both TTS and non-TTS voices. Then I "upgraded" to the nuvi 750 which totally removed the "ding" tone from the unit and required you to use either the non-TTS or the TTS for any kind of audible indication of your next turn.

One advantage of the non-TTS voice though is that they tend to be louder than their TTS counterparts.

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nuvi 760, nuvi 765T, nuvi 855, nuvi 3790LMT, nuvi 3490LMT - SoCal area

Spoken street names--excellent idea

I like the spoken street names. I've come to corners where you have a choice to turn on either side of a railroad. The streets are close to the railroad, thus close together. With a spoken street name, I know I'm on the right (or wrong) street because I can hear what street I'm supposed to be on and match it up with the street sign. (not that I've ever turned on the wrong street before I got the GPS, you understand)

Spoken street names - good or bad?

I have a Nuvi 270 without spoken streets and a Street Pilot 340 with. I think the spoken streets gpsr are easier to understand and there is less confusion, thus making them safer.

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Alan-Garmin c340

Spoken street names

I must admit that since I now use a 750, I do enjoy the spoken names; while relatively rare, street names can change and the TTS pronunciation can be goofy at times. There is a lot to be said for the simplicity of 'Turn left in 500 feet" if one has a good sense of distance and the eye doesn't have to search for an street sign with the corresponding name. Spoken names wasn't on my list of "must have" when I was shopping for a new GPSr, but since it came with it, I use it.

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"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Spoken street names - good or bad?

I agree with Alanrobin1, I think it adds a safety factor to using the GPS, especially when you're in heavy traffic.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

pchinote wrote: Personally

pchinote wrote:

Personally I do not have spoken street names on my 250W and do not miss them at all - but know someone looking at a new unit who is considering the advantages and disadvantages of having spoken street names on whatever they get.

Does anyone with experience of both have views on what is best and why?

How do you know you do not miss them?
No exaggeration, for me it may be the best feature added to a GPS, especially when streets are very close to each other, and/or you just can't take your eye off the road.

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Nuvi 765T, Street Pilot I5, Nuvi 750, Nuvi 3570

I like them

I like having the street names especially in an unfamiliar area or on the freeway. I have had my nuvi 750 for about a month now.

My unit doesn't have them

My Nuvi 200 doesn't have spoken names and for the most part it isn't needed. Boris (aka Dr. Nightmare) does an excellent job of announcing upcoming turns, but there are times when spoken street names would be helpful. Among these are when you come to an area with streets close together or intersections where 5 or more streets come together. The arrow and "Turn Left" doesn't always cut it.

--
ɐ‾nsǝɹ Just one click away from the end of the Internet

Spoken street names

Lets you keep your eyes on the road. So for safety's sake the spoken streets names are much better, is a lot easier to be instructed then have to take your eyes off the road and look at the map.

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

I'm too like the spoken

I'm too like the spoken street name. Knowing the name of the street I need to turn is much better and safer

street names

I like the spoken street names. That way I can anticipate where I am going and know what to look for. I also enjoy the voices and it gives me a laugh to hear how some street names are mispronounced.

I like them too.

The spoken street names make driving simpler for me. I find that I am more at ease with the specific directions.

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nuvi 785 nuvi 350, nuvi 270, GTM 20, jag in dash, mercedes in dash.

Glad I have street names spoken with my Nuvi 260

There are problems when on trips and the unit will give one of the Interstate names you are on but not the one you have been following. On I70 from Ohio to St. Louis you get several directions that refer to other route numbers, but not I70. Some what confusing when you are not ready for a different route number.

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260, 295W, 1490T,2455LMT

Personally, I think they are

Personally, I think they are nice to have. They may not be perfect, but they can make things easier when navigating.

Spoken Street names

I like the spoken street names. Going down I-77 where several exits are close together it is nice to hear the exit number and street name spoken as traffic can get hectic at times. Saves me from looking at the GPS screen and taking my eyes off the traffic. I cannot seem to get hang of multi tasking. I see a lot of folks on the road that can "text", smoke, read newspapers, and talk on the phone and watch the GPS all at once.

In addition, the mispronounced names can break up an otherwise boring day or trip.

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Mark - Nuvi 265T NUVI 50LM

Requirement

Spoken street names were a requirement when I was selecting my first GPSr. It is definitely a nice feature to have and I wouldn't buy a GSPr without it.

However, I find that on most trips I've taken recently, I have the voice muted unless I am in an unfamiliar location.

Very good...

I consider spoken street names to be an essential feature for a GPS. Consumer Reports highly recommends it because their testers and most users strongly prefer it. Spoken street names enable you to keep your eye off the screen in many cases in traffic. Nonetheless, they can cause an issue, because some streets are marked differently "on the ground" than they are in the GPS' database. (You may hear something like "County Road 138", where everybody local knows it by its marked name, "Davidson Rd.".) Of course, this same issue can also be a problem reading the screen, but at least watching the screen, you can see where you're supposed to turn, if you're looking. Another problem comes when The Voice mispronounces the name so badly, you can't recognize it on the signs. Still, I wouldn't buy a GPS without it.

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JMoo On

I Like it

I like it because around here there are many streets that are close together and I need to know which of the 3 streets in a 50 yard area I need to turn on.

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Magellan Maestro 4250, T-Mobile G1 with Google Maps, iPaq with TomTom, and a Tapwave Zodiac with TomTom and Mapopolis

Same Here

I was with a friend using a Nuvi 200 yesterday and we came to a 5-way intersection and it says 'turn left.' My friend got frustrated but all she need to do was glance at the screen to see the street name on which to turn. The TTS does help you keep your eyes on the road. A definte benefit when you are lost.

I like the TTS feature but it's not perfect. The voices are less clear, butcher many names, are lower in volume and are never available for fun voices. With that said, they are good enough too use and even get a chuckle out of the pronuncations at times.

I like to have TTS too since people want to use/borrow the GPS and it is much better to have this feature for a new user...especially when they think GPSs are some sort of auto-pilot.

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Eat at Joes.

Prefer spoken street names

Spoken street names was one of the primary sales points in my purchase of a Garmin 260. Although it has been fun to listen to the poor thing struggle in an area where it helps to know some Spanish in order to give directions. It has trouble with Ajo Way (AH hoh) and La Canada (Lah Can YAH dah.)

I have a developer friend who was going to name the streets in his subdivision after Aztec gods and goddesses. I wonder how it would have handled streets like: Avenida Netzahualcoyotl and Placita de Huitzilopochtli.

--
"The true measure of persons is how they treat someone who can do them absolutely no good." - Samuel Johnson

noticed a distinct pronunciation improvement here in Tucson

ntwajumela wrote:

Spoken street names was one of the primary sales points in my purchase of a Garmin 260. Although it has been fun to listen to the poor thing struggle in an area where it helps to know some Spanish in order to give directions. It has trouble with Ajo Way (AH hoh) and La Canada (Lah Can YAH dah.)

I noticed a distinct pronunciation improvement here in Tucson with the latest TTS voice updates on the Spanish named streets.

--
GM Built-in Navigation system - Samsung S6 Edge+ Smartphone with Garmin Viago, Google Maps & HERE Apps

Spoken streets is another safe way to know where you are

I have a garmin 670 with the TTS program, and I like that because I can have it speak in different languages when you travel, if you travel.
You can match the spoken words with the signs posted at intersections.

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Gps! ask where to go and get there! Best of all, what we need is to have accurate pois to reach all destinations

Good

Had an old Garmin Quest, and most of the time I left the volume turned way down. When I got to looking to upgrade, I didn't think the TTS was that big a deal, but ended up with a Nuvi 760. I love the spoken street names, and will likely never buy another GPS without the feature.

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The Moose Is Loose! nuvi 760

Naming streets

ntwajumela wrote:

I have a developer friend who was going to name the streets in his subdivision after Aztec gods and goddesses. I wonder how it would have handled streets like: Avenida Netzahualcoyotl and Placita de Huitzilopochtli.

Give your friend a good swift kick where it will get his attention and explain to him what a pain he is being and convince him to name the streets with reasonable names. If he doesn't listen, use a steel bar to get his attention and explain it again, if he survives.

Anyone use the spoken

Anyone use the spoken streetnames unit in Hawaii ? I'm wondering how accurate it speak those long Hawaiian street names. wink

I have used both and Spoken

I have used both and Spoken Street Names option is the first thing I look for when buying a new unit.

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Hawk - Nuvi 1450

It's more on the good side

It's more on the good side but more than a few times in a month I hear "Turn left onto unnamed street"

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-Chris

the only way to go...........

Having had my nuvis 360 and 750 for two years now, I could never enjoy another unit if it didn't have TTS and spoken street names....

but some people enjoy liver, so it's your choice...

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non-native nutmegger

Perhaps

I also didn't miss spoken street names until having a GPS'r that provided that added benefit. Now I won't have one without that feature.

When I first moved to Arizona, my first 2 car purchases didn't have AC and I didn't miss it. After 3 years of not having AC, I purchased a car with it. 32 years later I still won't have a vehicle without AC.

Funny how you can live without the benefits of additional technology until you have experienced it.

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Jeff...... Nuvi 2460, Nuvi 2595

It's a matter of budget

If you can afford a model that tells you the street name, go for it. If not, can deal with that too.

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dja24 - garmin nuvi 200W, etrex vista, etrex vista Cx

SPOKEN STREET NAMES GOOD OR BAD?

Anyone use the spoken streetnames unit in Hawaii ? I'm wondering how accurate it speak those long Hawaiian street names.

Can't say that Ive used them in Hawaii, however I live in a subdivision that has alot of native american indian names, like Piute, chickamagua, pawnee.. and surprisingly the voice come pretty close to getting them right... funny thing is, when using the voice of the australian chick, she has trouble with simple streets like "airline".. she pronounces them A-line...all in all, pronounciation is more than acceptable.

Roland
Garmin 755T

Spoken street names vs. none

I have a nuvi 200 and and a C320 from Garmin. Neither give me spoken street names. Have learned to use the "turn in XXX feet/miles". Sure is better than the paper map.
Maybe when I upgrade will go for the spoken streets. Just glad for the electronic age.

Guy

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guy-----C320>nuvi 200>Nuvi 255W

I also have the nuvi 200 . . .

and it does not have TTS so you have to look at the display for the name of the street or road you're being directed to take by the gps. I don't find it difficult to use.

But when I bought my mother a gps for her birthday, I thougth TTS would be better for her. That way she could hear the spoken names and not have to take her eyes off the road as often to check the display directions and try to remember the street/road name.

--
Winston Churchill said, “Americans can always be counted on to do the right thing, after exhausting all other possibilities.”

Get a capable unit

If you/they decide they don't want the spoken names, they can use a non-TTS voice.

Personally, I'll join the choir - I enjoy the feature. It helps me keep my eyes on the road in unfamiliar areas.

I like

gdwooden wrote:

Maybe when I upgrade will go for the spoken streets.

I did and won't go back BUT.........
With Magellan at least, it CAN get a bit annoying when approaching some urban Interstate routes. If they are known by several different names, the TTS announces ALL of them....Exit44I270WestWalnutStreetKansasCity. It's annoying enough that the mechanical voice doesn't seem to know what spaces ARE but then after repeating it about 4 times it gets REALLY annoying.
Does Garmin have a similar "problem"?

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Magellan Maestro 4250// MIO C310X

Won't go back

I made a number of multi-state trips using my GPSMAP 76CSx. It beeps and trills (user can select various sounds) for upcoming turns and when you get to the turn itself. It was great.

I got a nüvi 760 for my new job. I LOVE the TTS and now I wouldn't spend the money on a new automotive GPS that didn't have that feature.

I did get the nüvi 200 later for my wife but it was a promotional device that I didn't have to pay for. She likes it just fine but, on our trips, we still use the 760 with TTS. It's been very helpful in strange places and in weird street configurations.

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GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

Like spoken street names on my Nuvi 760

I find personally that it makes it easier and less distracting to hear the spoken street names, particularly in an unfamiliar area or with heavy traffic. I don't have to take my eyes off the road and actually glance at the GPS.

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Nuvi 760 Nuvi 2598 LMT Nuvi 3597 LMT Garmin Streetpilot Onboard for iPhone

Next unit will have it

My unit doesn't have the TTS and to be honest I'm fine without it, but with so many people praising the feature my next GPS will definitely be equipped with it. grin

my 765T seems to only

my 765T seems to only announce one name.(And only two times usually )It is true sometimes it is not the name people in the area refer to, but that is rare and I have never had that happen with a regular residential street name, only a section of a state highway....As in "RT32" instead of "Stafford RD".
But on that same road on another section it will call it "Stafford Rd" instead of RT32. I am guessing this is a function of the map, not Garmin device. It is saying whatever is on the top banner for a road name.
Really do feel it is a must have feature.

On my 765T, I do not agree the voices are all hard to understand. The US voices are mechanical sounding, but understandable. I use the British voices. Emily and Daniel are now my friends.....smile

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Nuvi 765T, Street Pilot I5, Nuvi 750, Nuvi 3570

Spoken street names

Spoken street names are valuable to me. What I dislike are spoken turns that are left when the screen arrow shows right. Seems the arrow has been correct the few times this has happened.

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:260W, 50LM

It's a nice feature, but

It's nice to have and 90% of the time the speach is close enough. However, I would not see it as a dealbreaker to not have it on a unit.

Prefer Spoken Names

I have used both versions and prefer the spoken names. The need to clance over if in heavy traffic is reduced. I listen to my MP3 player must of the time so I get an additional warning because it pauses so that Jill can yell at me or tell me to turn.

--
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving in a pretty, pristine body but rather to come sliding in sideways, all used up and exclaiming, "Wow, what a ride!" -------- Nuvi 755T and 1350T Jensen NVX225 WorldNavigator PDA based GPS

Like the spoken names

As for speaking the names of the streets, I prefer the having the GPS say the names. With Garmin, they have offered alternative seasonal voice (i.e. Dr. Doom for Halloween, etc.). When I switch to these seasonal voices, I found out they are not fully enhanced and they can not speak the street names only 'turn right in 50 feet". When I switched to them, I really feel the difference in driving. Its akin all of sudden replace your wife as the 'co-pilot' and replacing it with a 'bonehead' teenager. Hence, I do prefer the street names.
Additionally, as I drive on familiar roads, I never realized the names of some of the road and I do get a little kick out of hearing 'GPS Karen' mis-pronounce the street names occasional (Yes, I do have a boring drive at times. How did you know?...lol...)

Why Not Have Name and Distance?

I have often wondered why they don't have both. For example "Turn left in 500 feet on Elm Street".

My Magellan does

My Magellan Maestro 3225 gives me a warning at 2 miles, like "left turn in 2 miles, Dover Street". it does it again at a half mile, "left turn in point five miles, Dover Street", then about when I should turn my signal on for a left turn it says "approaching left turn, Dover Street". Then at the corner itself, it plays a musical chime, like ding-dong. If it were a right turn, the chime is dong-ding. If you miss your turn you really were not paying attention.

Spoken street names

I wouldn't have it any other way.

It seems nearly unanimous to me. wink

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nüvi 750 & 760

I prefer spoken names

I will go with the majority here. I like the Spoken names on my 255W. If I have to, I can deal without having them, as I do with my older 200 which doesn't see much use these days.

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Matt

Spoken Street Names - Good Or Bad?

It is definitely an advantage. Enhancing the ability to watch the road, not the GPS at confusing intersections.

--
TomTom built in and Garmin Nuvi 1490T. Eastern Iowa, formerly Southern California "You can check out any time you like...but you can never leave."

Both distance and road name

jmckeogh wrote:

I have often wondered why they don't have both. For example "Turn left in 500 feet on Elm Street".

It does say both, on my 765T.."Daniel" and "Emily" says,..."In .5 miles, turn left on Spring Street."

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Nuvi 765T, Street Pilot I5, Nuvi 750, Nuvi 3570

Street Names

Having spoken street names gives you confidence the unit knows what it is doing. Also, as others have mentioned, when there is several options to turn it makes it clear which is the intended route. I have found when it says a street name that doesn't exist you are about to get lost.

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