To Flu or not to Flu ...

 

I am just now on the tail end of a nasty bought with the flu. I Ended up needing to go to the local urgent care type place. Not a fan of this place by the insurance wants you to use it instead of the (more expensive) ER. Any some blood work, an EKG, yea I have the flu so the give me some medicine and send me home, saying if it get worse go the the ER.

Now I get a flu shot every year, like clockwork and I will still get the flu every now and then, and boy it sucks all desire to live right out of ya. My wife, on the other hand, never gets the shot and I can't recall if she has ever had a go with it or not, she say never has.

So I'm wondering, how to you folks do with getting, or not getting, the shots and getting, or not getting, the flu?

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .
<<Page 3

I think it is 2 to 6 months

Lost Anyway wrote:

(I've seen different figures for the correct interval between doses: 2-6 months, or 6-12 months.)

Where did you see 6-12? I've only seen and heard 2-6 from serious sources.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Shingrix.

Our pharmacist told us 6-12 months between shots when we got our first dose. They called us about 6 months later to come in for the second dose.

--
Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

After the deaths form the

After the deaths form the swine flue vaccine in 1976 I will never get a flue shot!

--
an94

Those deaths were attributed to Guillain-Barre syndrome

an94 wrote:

After the deaths form the swine flue vaccine in 1976 I will never get a flue shot!

Those deaths were attributed to Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). As to what the Mayo Clinic says about GBS I offer the following...

“The exact cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome is unknown. But it is often preceded by an infectious illness such as a respiratory infection or the stomach flu.”

Are you not trading one inaction for a potential problem? If you remember the 1976 flu shot issues 54 years ago), you may be too old to buy green bananas, but have you had the two pneumonia shots?

--
John from PA

population

Lost Anyway wrote:

~snip~

The Shingrix supply situation is apparently very regional; there are areas of the country where it may be a little tough but is not nearly as hard to come by, at least so I've heard.

~snip

Could be based on how many people live in the area. I live in a heavily populated area, southeastern part of PA.

I got a script from my doctor last week (Wednesday) for the Shingrix vaccine. I tried to get it on Saturday at CVS but there were some problems with my insurance, and believe it or not, I called the insurance number on the card and they were closed until Monday. I called yesterday (Monday) got it straightened out and had the first of the two shots by 2pm at my local CVS.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Not sure where you live, Rx might not be necessary

soberbyker wrote:

Could be based on how many people live in the area. I live in a heavily populated area, southeastern part of PA.

I got a script from my doctor last week (Wednesday) for the Shingrix vaccine. I tried to get it on Saturday at CVS but there were some problems with my insurance, and believe it or not, I called the insurance number on the card and they were closed until Monday. I called yesterday (Monday) got it straightened out and had the first of the two shots by 2pm at my local CVS.

Possible money saver; I live in Exton and the Walgreens does not require any Rx.

--
John from PA

.

John from PA wrote:

Possible money saver; I live in Exton and the Walgreens does not require any Rx.

OK, but with a script it was 100% covered by my insurance, not sure if it would have been without it.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

I was unaware that any insurance covered the cost...

I was unaware that any insurance covered the cost of receiving the Shingrix vaccine.

--
Politicians and Diapers must be changed often for the exact same reason...

Some do...

koot wrote:

I was unaware that any insurance covered the cost of receiving the Shingrix vaccine.

...it all depends on the coverage. I also think Medicare part D will cover it as well as both of the pneumonia vaccine.

By the way, although I did not have an Rx from any of my physicians, the name of one is shown on the Walgreens paperwork as the “prescribing physician.”. I assume that physician is a Walgreens employee of some sort, perhaps nothing more than a contract employee.

--
John from PA

Shots

The wife and I both have Medicare and another insurance, and they pay in full for both flu and shingles (both doses) shots

--
johnm405 660 & MSS&T

Coronavirus

Hopefully, a vaccine for the Coronavirus will be available in the near future. If so, I'll be the first in line.

I'm a believer and have been immunized for flu, pneumonia & shingles.

Shots

I get the senior shot for the flu, got the 2 shot for shingles, and prevnar 23 but caught a strain of pneumonia that it was ineffective and had to go to hospital, bummer.

Just a suggestion

bdhsfz6 wrote:

Hopefully, a vaccine for the Coronavirus will be available in the near future. If so, I'll be the first in line.

I'm a believer and have been immunized for flu, pneumonia & shingles.

Again as before I am not a Doctor. If and it will hit and spread rapidly because we will not stop and Quarantine adequately (it takes 2 weeks to develop)be ready. Go to Lowes Paint Dept, purchase some good N-95 Dust/Fumes Masks. Now it takes a Ceramic Filter to stop a Virus but a good N-95 (95% Filtration) should give you 85-95 percent protection if you follow common sense Rules, do not move, remove or touch underneath mask, people scratch or lift mask to talk on Cell Phone. Wash hands Frequently, avoid confined or crowded spaces. Now the shocker, CVS and Walgreens sell Masks, are sold out, but guess what, most of those sold were Surgical Masks. A surgical Mask does not give a good tight seal, it is designed for spit, fluids and such. A N-95 at Lowes will be cheaper and give a better seal even with facial hairs. Now that's another factor, beards and other facial hairs affect seal but just wearing a mask will greatly reduce the droplets from that person coughing in your face.

The Flu

I don't like shots. I don't like the FLU. Between the two I'll take the shot any day. I've been getting the flu shot for a long time, probably 15 years or more. In that time I can only remember getting the flu once...! So for me, it has worked out well, the older I get the more valuable it is to do anything you can to not get sick.

--
2597 Sometimes I wonder..."Why is that Frisbee getting bigger?"...and then, it hits me.

thank you

CraigW wrote:
almostbob wrote:

Hasn't changed much, same list in 1983, + BCG

BCG is a tuberculosis vaccine used for people at high risk of contracting tuberculosis or those going to TB-prone areas as was the case for you in your deployment.

It's not routinely given in the US since the incidence of TB in the US is quite rare and also because people who have received BCG will likely test positive with the tuberculin skin test as well as for TB-infected people. Therefore the tuberculin test won't be useful as a diagnostic test for active TB in those who have received the vaccine.

Almostbob, should you ever need a tuberculosis test for anything, I suggest telling them that you've received BCG and that a tuberculin test may give a false positive result. If a test for TB is still needed, possibly a chest x-ray will satisfy those asking for the test.

Thank you

--
If only ..

TB blood test viable alternative

CraigW wrote:
almostbob wrote:

Hasn't changed much, same list in 1983, + BCG

BCG is a tuberculosis vaccine used for people at high risk of contracting tuberculosis or those going to TB-prone areas as was the case for you in your deployment.

It's not routinely given in the US since the incidence of TB in the US is quite rare and also because people who have received BCG will likely test positive with the tuberculin skin test as well as for TB-infected people. Therefore the tuberculin test won't be useful as a diagnostic test for active TB in those who have received the vaccine.

Almostbob, should you ever need a tuberculosis test for anything, I suggest telling them that you've received BCG and that a tuberculin test may give a false positive result. If a test for TB is still needed, possibly a chest x-ray will satisfy those asking for the test.

Although the tuberculin Skin Test (TST) may yield a false-positive, TB blood tests are not affected by prior a BCG vaccination and are less likely to give a false-positive result.

--
John from PA

@archae86

archae86 wrote:
Lost Anyway wrote:

(I've seen different figures for the correct interval between doses: 2-6 months, or 6-12 months.)

Where did you see 6-12? I've only seen and heard 2-6 from serious sources.

You're right, and I was wrong.

I thought I saw another article a week ago saying 6-12 months but cannot now find it now. By far most evidence supports 2-6 months, not 6-12 months. The CDC says: 2-6 months. Research suggested there was some fall-off in immunity if the second dose was delayed until a full 12 months after the first, but no falloff at the six-month mark, and that was the basis for the CDC recommendation.

Because the safety and effectiveness of three doses of Shingrix has not been studied, the CDC actually does not recommend restarting the series and getting a third shot if the second one is delayed longer than one year; the CDC says just get the second dose as soon as you can, at least two months after the first dose, and try to get it within six months.
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/hcp/shingrix/admin...

--
"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

I Vote "Yes" for Flu Shots

Have had them regularly and so far so good. Right now I'm enduring a bout with a cold. That Coronavirus is somewhat scary for me. No reason to think I might get it unless it spreads much more. But prognostications by the CDC aren't particularly good.

--
Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

Good additional info on Shingrix intervals

Lost Anyway wrote:

The CDC says: 2-6 months. Research suggested there was some fall-off in immunity if the second dose was delayed until a full 12 months after the first, but no falloff at the six-month mark, and that was the basis for the CDC recommendation.

Because the safety and effectiveness of three doses of Shingrix has not been studied, the CDC actually does not recommend restarting the series and getting a third shot if the second one is delayed longer than one year; the CDC says just get the second dose as soon as you can, at least two months after the first dose, and try to get it within six months.

Thanks for looking up and sharing these extra details.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Flu shot

I get the flu shot understanding it may not be the exact strain but medical professionals say that it will help lessen symptoms even if it is not quite the right strain you are being vaccinated against.

Nope

Don’t get the shot...63 and more worried about the reaction than the flu

--
"You can't get there from here"

also Nope

Luckily don't have a problem with flu. Some people I know still get the flu even when vaccinated.

I did this year

sl4gps61 wrote:

Luckily don't have a problem with flu. Some people I know still get the flu even when vaccinated.

This is true, I got the shot in October and got the flu in January. It happens. The shot is made up of known strains at the time, new strains pop up all the time, so the shot can't help you with those. I've gotten the shot for many many years, only the second time I caught the flu on top of it.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Sore arm beats this any day

TMK wrote:

Don’t get the shot...63 and more worried about the reaction than the flu

These are the symptoms of this years flu, which is now being reported as a potential double barrel blast (once, type A; 2nd time type B).

Fever or feeling feverish/chills.

Cough.

Sore throat.

Runny or stuffy nose.

Muscle or body aches.

Headaches.

Fatigue (tiredness)

Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

--
John from PA

And then there's the flu deaths

John from PA wrote:
TMK wrote:

Don’t get the shot...63 and more worried about the reaction than the flu

These are the symptoms of this years flu, which is now being reported as a potential double barrel blast (once, type A; 2nd time type B).

Fever or feeling feverish/chills.

Cough.

Sore throat.

Runny or stuffy nose.

Muscle or body aches.

Headaches.

Fatigue (tiredness)

Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

Current US death estimates from this season's flu:

https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2020/01/24/us-flu-deaths-climb...

sorry

Those who say not to get the shot.

Respectfully, imho this is not good advice. Respectfully I think a person should in fact do what they feel is best for themselves, just that they should make an earnest attempt to not necessarily encourage others to follow.

Again I use my cousin as an example. He's highly intelligent and makes a gazillion dollars in the corporate world. He advocates not getting vaccinations, not wearing a seatbelt, not going to church, and not saving for retirement via 401k (he says that's for fools).

I could be totally wrong--but I believe that all of the above is bad advice.

For the naysayers, at least it's nearly too late (it isn't, but it's kinda like that column the other day where the guy was 58 and said he has saved $0 for retirement, asked is it too late, and was told no, that's sugar coating)

the people that get infected with the flu virus can thank those

johnnatash4 wrote:

Those who say not to get the shot.

Respectfully, imho this is not good advice. Respectfully I think a person should in fact do what they feel is best for themselves, just that they should make an earnest attempt to not necessarily encourage others to follow.

Again I use my cousin as an example. He's highly intelligent and makes a gazillion dollars in the corporate world. He advocates not getting vaccinations, not wearing a seatbelt, not going to church, and not saving for retirement via 401k (he says that's for fools).

I could be totally wrong--but I believe that all of the above is bad advice.

For the naysayers, at least it's nearly too late (it isn't, but it's kinda like that column the other day where the guy was 58 and said he has saved $0 for retirement, asked is it too late, and was told no, that's sugar coating)

The people that refuse to get vaccinated for influenza are largely responsible for others coming down with the virus (whether those people receive the vaccine or not). So, the people that get infected with the flu virus can thank those irresponsible (a.k.a. harebrained) people that refused to get vaccinated.

--
Politicians and Diapers must be changed often for the exact same reason...

you

koot wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

Those who say not to get the shot.

Respectfully, imho this is not good advice. Respectfully I think a person should in fact do what they feel is best for themselves, just that they should make an earnest attempt to not necessarily encourage others to follow.

Again I use my cousin as an example. He's highly intelligent and makes a gazillion dollars in the corporate world. He advocates not getting vaccinations, not wearing a seatbelt, not going to church, and not saving for retirement via 401k (he says that's for fools).

I could be totally wrong--but I believe that all of the above is bad advice.

For the naysayers, at least it's nearly too late (it isn't, but it's kinda like that column the other day where the guy was 58 and said he has saved $0 for retirement, asked is it too late, and was told no, that's sugar coating)

The people that refuse to get vaccinated for influenza are largely responsible for others coming down with the virus (whether those people receive the vaccine or not). So, the people that get infected with the flu virus can thank those irresponsible (a.k.a. harebrained) people that refused to get vaccinated.

Are right, to illustrate some more with my cousin. He works in the financial industry, says there is no value to an elite education, as he has none. Well, he's lucky. So is the 19 y.o. kid who gets drafted into the NHL. But if we're average, we should follow conventional wisdom and not be a cowboy. When one of our cousins stated how much he had to borrow for medical school, my other cousin above basically said you made your bed you have to sleep in it! sigh

Being a cowboy reminds me of that movie with Paul Newman, HUD. It happened to be on 2 weeks ago when I was on the road, so I watched it again. Those types are better suited to stay away from everyone else.

Kind of illogical there, Bud...

koot wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

Those who say not to get the shot.

Respectfully, imho this is not good advice. Respectfully I think a person should in fact do what they feel is best for themselves, just that they should make an earnest attempt to not necessarily encourage others to follow.

Again I use my cousin as an example. He's highly intelligent and makes a gazillion dollars in the corporate world. He advocates not getting vaccinations, not wearing a seatbelt, not going to church, and not saving for retirement via 401k (he says that's for fools).

I could be totally wrong--but I believe that all of the above is bad advice.

For the naysayers, at least it's nearly too late (it isn't, but it's kinda like that column the other day where the guy was 58 and said he has saved $0 for retirement, asked is it too late, and was told no, that's sugar coating)

The people that refuse to get vaccinated for influenza are largely responsible for others coming down with the virus (whether those people receive the vaccine or not). So, the people that get infected with the flu virus can thank those irresponsible (a.k.a. harebrained) people that refused to get vaccinated.

If you are vaccinated then whether or not I get vaccinated shouldn’t matter because you should be safe....if we who don’t get vaccinated only give it to each other I’d say that pretty much qualifies as a mind your own business situation. If, on the other hand, you’re saying the vaccinated get it from the unvaccinated that pretty much proves the point that vaccinations are pablum for the weak minded masses.

--
"You can't get there from here"

And not 36 hours after my original post

John from PA wrote:
TMK wrote:

Don’t get the shot...63 and more worried about the reaction than the flu

These are the symptoms of this years flu, which is now being reported as a potential double barrel blast (once, type A; 2nd time type B).

Fever or feeling feverish/chills.

Cough.

Sore throat.

Runny or stuffy nose.

Muscle or body aches.

Headaches.

Fatigue (tiredness)

Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

I awoke with a 103 degree fever, wracking cough and and and...nope, not the flu but some other virus that kept me sick until now and has my lungs messed up. My doc says there’s no vaccine that would have prevented what happened to me...life...you pays your money...you takes your chances...

--
"You can't get there from here"

It is all in the odds

TMK wrote:

If you are vaccinated then whether or not I get vaccinated shouldn’t matter because you should be safe....if we who don’t get vaccinated only give it to each other I’d say that pretty much qualifies as a mind your own business situation. If, on the other hand, you’re saying the vaccinated get it from the unvaccinated that pretty much proves the point that vaccinations are pablum for the weak minded masses.

It alters the odds. Substantially. Just as fire won't propagate if the fuel is thinned out enough, where the level of "herd immunity" is high enough infectious diseases dampen out rather than increasing as they spread.

Vaccines are not pablum. They do vary in effectiveness.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Or...

TMK wrote:

If you are vaccinated then whether or not I get vaccinated shouldn’t matter because you should be safe....if we who don’t get vaccinated only give it to each other I’d say that pretty much qualifies as a mind your own business situation. If, on the other hand, you’re saying the vaccinated get it from the unvaccinated that pretty much proves the point that vaccinations are pablum for the weak minded masses.

Or it could be that those urging everyone that can receive the vaccine to get it, these folks are protecting those who are unable to received the vaccine: infants under six months old, those with severe allergies to a component of the vaccine, and some folks who have had Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

Keep In Mind

TMK wrote:
koot wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

If you are vaccinated then whether or not I get vaccinated shouldn’t matter because you should be safe....if we who don’t get vaccinated only give it to each other I’d say that pretty much qualifies as a mind your own business situation. If, on the other hand, you’re saying the vaccinated get it from the unvaccinated that pretty much proves the point that vaccinations are pablum for the weak minded masses.

It should be noted that in most seasons, the flu vaccine is significantly less than 100% effective. Vaccinated individuals may still get flu but the symptoms are likely to be less severe.

Vaccinated individuals can get sick from exposure and are still threatened by the propagation of the disease.

And I get that...

CraigW wrote:
TMK wrote:

If you are vaccinated then whether or not I get vaccinated shouldn’t matter because you should be safe....if we who don’t get vaccinated only give it to each other I’d say that pretty much qualifies as a mind your own business situation. If, on the other hand, you’re saying the vaccinated get it from the unvaccinated that pretty much proves the point that vaccinations are pablum for the weak minded masses.

Or it could be that those urging everyone that can receive the vaccine to get it, these folks are protecting those who are unable to received the vaccine: infants under six months old, those with severe allergies to a component of the vaccine, and some folks who have had Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

Look, I am no anti-vaxxer...measles, polio, TB, diphtheria, etc. where the vaccines have proven effective at eradicating horrific diseases are all great and wonderful things and have my 100% support. But the flu vaccine is different, it’s a crap shoot, might work, might not...maybe this year, maybe next, maybe not...my body, my choice as my 70s girlfriend taught me wink and I’ll not be called harebrained without response for exercising a choice in a crapshoot medical model. Come up with a flu vaccine guaranteed to work and I’ll be the first in line...otherwise, we’ll just agree to disagree.

--
"You can't get there from here"

Will get more shots today

I got my Tdap shot last week and this morning I'm going to Costco Pharmacy to get my Pneumovax23 pneumococcal shot. I had the Prevnar 13 pneumococcal shot back in 2015. This should bring me up to date on all vaccinations.

Moderation

Let's try to get back to the more fruitful and helpful discussion on this topic.

Please keep the forum rules in mind, particularly the first several points.

Be friendly and polite. We will not tolerate personal attacks, insults, rudeness, or inflammatory posts.
Avoid bickering or arguing for sport. POI Factory is not a forum for politically charged debate.

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/28855

~Angela

Thank you

GlobeTurtle wrote:

Let's try to get back to the more fruitful and helpful discussion on this topic.

Please keep the forum rules in mind, particularly the first several points.

Be friendly and polite. We will not tolerate personal attacks, insults, rudeness, or inflammatory posts.
Avoid bickering or arguing for sport. POI Factory is not a forum for politically charged debate.

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/28855

~Angela

Thanks for your work Angela and for reopening this thread, I missed the fireworks and hope folks can be adult in their responses.

I'm glad you reopened this thread as I have learned a few things from the comments. I ended up getting the first of two Shingrix shots, at 61 yrs old I probably should have gotten in sooner but I didn't know it was a thing.

Hope to learn more, thanks again.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Nearly impossible to be 100%

bdhsfz6 wrote:

It should be noted that in most seasons, the flu vaccine is significantly less than 100% effective. Vaccinated individuals may still get flu but the symptoms are likely to be less severe.

Vaccinated individuals can get sick from exposure and are still threatened by the propagation of the disease.

Nearly impossible to be 100% effective. The shots are formulated from the known viruses at the time. New strains pop up all the time and sometimes after the shots were produced so the shot wouldn't cover those newer strains.

I have gotten the shot probably for the past 20 years or so years, got the flu twice in that time, most recently earlier this year. It was a new strain, popped up after the shot's formula was produced, it happens.

I liken getting the shots to keeping a fire extinguisher in the house, hope I never need it, and if I should, it might not be enough to put the fire out but it's better to have it for the times it will.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

It's Not all about the vaccine itself

The immune system and response of each person is different. People have different responses to all meds, even common OTC. Some meds work, some don't... for certain people.

Look, since the advent of learning to use hot water for the sanitary benefits it provides, many illnesses have been attenuated. Simple hot water was a HUGE advancement in sanitary practices. People can still get burned to this day. Gonna reject using hot water because of the risks?

No med is 100% effective for all people. Nothing can be all things to all people all the time.

I get all the vaccines and immunizations, and I have not had those illnesses. I think that is a good thing.

Peace.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

I am not for or against getting Flu shot

That's your decision and right to make that choice. Some of you may remember Elizabeth Taylor, she died because of over use of Penicillin. When she finally really needed it her body rejected it because she kept getting Penicillin shots for every thing. Doctors used to give you a shot of it just to justify the Office Visit Charge back when. Your body is a machine, it wears out with use. Jogging means Knee replacement, repetitive movement Carpel Tunnel and so on. Your Immune System is the same, again ask your Vet about shots for Dogs, a good Vet will tell you. Why do I say ask a Vet, the are actually often better trained, qualified then Physicians. Many Medical advancements are first developed, tested in Veterinary Medicine, a Vet has to know more varying Parameter's because of different animals

A record-breaking 105 U.S. children have died from flu so far

A record-breaking 105 U.S. children have died from flu so far this season.

"If you're vaccinated and you still get the flu, you're more likely to have a less severe infection. Your risk of dying is less."

https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/21/health/child-flu-deaths-105/i...

--
Politicians and Diapers must be changed often for the exact same reason...

Coronavirus

The flu I had caught that prompted me to start this thread was the "B" type, whatever that means. The scary one is this coronavirus traveling across the globe, scientists say a vaccine is months away. Who knows how many more people/places it will infect by then.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Sure get vaccinated. But

Sure get vaccinated. But don't expect the flu vaccine to do much for most active flu strains. The effectiveness in recent years has been remarkably low.

CDC effectiveness estimate

telecomdigest2 wrote:

The effectiveness in recent years has been remarkably low.

For anyone interested in how the CDC effectiveness estimates are generated, there is an informative page here:
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/effectivenessqa.htm
The CDC posts estimates of effectiveness by year here:
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/past-seasons-estimates...
People make up their own guesses based on a handful of anecdotes, personal experiences, and fragmentary news stories. The CDC methods can't generate perfect truth, but they are a whole lot better than personal guessing.

Disclosure: although trained as an electrical engineer with a career in electronic design (microprocessors and simulation systems) and large-scale data analysis (semiconductor factory data) in graduate school I had a flirtation with medical diagnostic equipement design aspirations, and took a course in biomedical statistics and epidemiology taught on the Harvard Medical School campus.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Nah...

windwalker wrote:

That's your decision and right to make that choice. Some of you may remember Elizabeth Taylor, she died because of over use of Penicillin.

In 1961 and while on the set of "Cleopatra," Elizabeth Taylor contracted a deadly infection caused by staph bacteria that were resistant to penicillin. It was methicillin, a new synthetic form of penicillin developed for this reason, which likely saved her life.

She died in 2011 of congestive heart failure at the age of 79. I suspect many of us here hope to reach that number!

--
John from PA

Low Effectivity is better than No Effectivity

I'll take low effectiveness over no vaccine. With low effectiveness, at least I have a decent chance. Even when the vaccine does not prevent an event, it attenuates the severity. All good.

Just about all medical procedures have an effectiveness. Some are better than others. That's well known. It can take attempts with several meds before the one that works is found. Some meds don't work for some people, same meds work better for other people. Nothing new there.

telecomdigest2 wrote:

Sure get vaccinated. But don't expect the flu vaccine to do much for most active flu strains. The effectiveness in recent years has been remarkably low.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.
<<Page 3