basecamp route useing longitude/latitude

 

now that i can do basecamp with waypoints or routeing tool
i would like to try doing a route with longitude/latitude
coordinates . how do i enter a starting point lat/lon and
then 3 or 4 more turns .i am sure this is old stuff for you
guys but i am a little new at this wizz,bang stuff .
overthehill ..

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Capt Confusion

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FIND>Locate Coordinates.

FIND>Locate Coordinates. Show on map. Make it a waypoint then create a route using the waypoints.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Or ...

Ctrl + t

You can then enter coords and create waypoints.

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Where there's a will ... there's a way ... DriveSmart50LMT-D, Nuvi 2508LMT-D, 1490LMT, 1310, Montana 650T, Etrex 20

.

You can also use the Waypoint tool and click directly on the map to create the point.

You can manually adjust the coordinates as needed by selecting the waypoint.

Coordinate Source?

Before you build a route using waypoints created from coordinates, consider their source. Many coordinates posted on the internet for places like restaurants, gas stations and points of interest are notoriously inaccurate. Sometimes, these coordinate locations are not near enough to a routatable road for Basecamp and your GPSr to create a viable route.

It is always a good idea to check the actual location of your coordinate created waypoints. You can do this by entering the coordinates in Google Earth. For example, is the waypoint for that restaurant in the middle of a shopping center? If so, your GPS may not route correctly. The waypoint for places like this should be at the driveway entrance to the shopping center, not the restaurant itself.

It is also wise to verify your route by "simulating" it in Basecamp to make sure its taking you where you want to go. Remember that famous quote by Yogi Berra: "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up someplace else".

Me too

Motorcycle Mama wrote:

You can also use the Waypoint tool and click directly on the map to create the point.
You can manually adjust the coordinates as needed by selecting the waypoint.

What MM said, I guess that's kinda how I do it. I zoom into the map and use the waypoint tool to make a waypoint. I think too as mentioned above the lat/long's from some source may not be too accurate. Having said that, they may get you reasonably close and then you can use the waypoint tool.

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, 3790LMT passed on to my daughter. Using Windows 10

Yes ...

... Although I'm not sure from the OPs post that is what is wanted. He talks about entering lat/long coords, not just clicking on the map wink

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Where there's a will ... there's a way ... DriveSmart50LMT-D, Nuvi 2508LMT-D, 1490LMT, 1310, Montana 650T, Etrex 20

What the OP Said

sussamb wrote:

... Although I'm not sure from the OPs post that is what is wanted. He talks about entering lat/long coords, not just clicking on the map wink

That's how I took his post. He has the coordinates, now he wants to create a route. Using find to locate the spot, then use it for route creation.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

accuracy

If you have coordinates from third party, accuracy, as bdhsfz6 said, can be a problem. Depends how they were taken. Some people just click on Google maps, get point coordinates, and than publish them without checking. Sometimes it can be way off. So checking coordinates before you use them is not bad idea. Especially if point is located somewhere in country side, you can get yourself in big problems.

.

sussamb wrote:

... Although I'm not sure from the OPs post that is what is wanted. He talks about entering lat/long coords, not just clicking on the map wink

Right but this achieves that purpose.

Click anywhere on the map to create a waypoint. Then edit the coordinates to whatever you want ... even a point on the other side of the world. It doesn't matter.

The waypoint tool is the way to do it.

Coordinates.

I understand what sussamb is getting at. If you a working with a list of coordinates, that is the input you have so you may not even know where it is on the map until you enter the coordinates in. Both methods are equally valid. It just depends on the information you are working with and what you are trying to accomplish. Overthehill didn't really give us much detail about what kind of information he is working with. He just asked how to input coordinates.

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Alan - Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra

Well ...

Motorcycle Mama wrote:
sussamb wrote:

... Although I'm not sure from the OPs post that is what is wanted. He talks about entering lat/long coords, not just clicking on the map wink

Right but this achieves that purpose.

Click anywhere on the map to create a waypoint. Then edit the coordinates to whatever you want ... even a point on the other side of the world. It doesn't matter.

The waypoint tool is the way to do it.

Well it's a way to do it, but not the way in my opinion. If you click on the map and create a waypoint, you then need to open that waypoint and edit the waypoint properties. Ctrl + t brings up a box where you simply enter the coords. One action rather than two. With a number of points to enter I know which I'd rather use.

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Where there's a will ... there's a way ... DriveSmart50LMT-D, Nuvi 2508LMT-D, 1490LMT, 1310, Montana 650T, Etrex 20

Try Extra POI editor.

bdhsfz6 wrote:

Before you build a route using waypoints created from coordinates, consider their source. Many coordinates posted on the internet for places like restaurants, gas stations and points of interest are notoriously inaccurate. Sometimes, these coordinate locations are not near enough to a routatable road for Basecamp and your GPSr to create a viable route.

It is always a good idea to check the actual location of your coordinate created waypoints. You can do this by entering the coordinates in Google Earth. For example, is the waypoint for that restaurant in the middle of a shopping center? If so, your GPS may not route correctly. The waypoint for places like this should be at the driveway entrance to the shopping center, not the restaurant itself.

It is also wise to verify your route by "simulating" it in Basecamp to make sure its taking you where you want to go. Remember that famous quote by Yogi Berra: "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up someplace else".

It might be easier to import or enter your coordinates into Extra POI Editor. Open each location and go to satellite map. You will be able to drag your waypoint to the proper location.

Easier than dragging around in Google Earth.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

well

[quote=GPSgeek
It might be easier to import or enter your coordinates into Extra POI Editor. Open each location and go to satellite map. You will be able to drag your waypoint to the proper location.
Easier than dragging around in Google Earth.

Well this is one I had never even thought of !!!
Maybe this will help me create another POI file with about 150 locations.

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, 3790LMT passed on to my daughter. Using Windows 10

E.P.E. is Indeed a Great Program!

GPSgeek wrote:
bdhsfz6 wrote:

Before you build a route using waypoints created from coordinates, consider their source. Many coordinates posted on the internet for places like restaurants, gas stations and points of interest are notoriously inaccurate. Sometimes, these coordinate locations are not near enough to a routatable road for Basecamp and your GPSr to create a viable route.

It is always a good idea to check the actual location of your coordinate created waypoints. You can do this by entering the coordinates in Google Earth. For example, is the waypoint for that restaurant in the middle of a shopping center? If so, your GPS may not route correctly. The waypoint for places like this should be at the driveway entrance to the shopping center, not the restaurant itself.

It is also wise to verify your route by "simulating" it in Basecamp to make sure its taking you where you want to go. Remember that famous quote by Yogi Berra: "If you don't know where you're going, you'll end up someplace else".

It might be easier to import or enter your coordinates into Extra POI Editor. Open each location and go to satellite map. You will be able to drag your waypoint to the proper location.

Easier than dragging around in Google Earth.

EPE is actually what I use for this purpose. Since the OP has just mastered the basics of Basecamp, it might be a bit much for him to tackle EPE's steep learning curve at this point. That's why I suggested Google Earth.

all good info

I've used all of the above ... and still do..been years now.. the OP has some foot work to do. Keep's him out of trouble. Ha.
Like the man said it depends on what info he's working with or wants.

I myself still use Mapsource for making routes. I zoom in and make sure the waypoint (favorite) is on the right spot.. Heading out West for a 7 or 8 thosand mile trip to all the National Parks for the 3rd time this way. I use MS and EPE to plan and create.. love the "find along route within " option in EPE. POI Places taken from POI files here so I can eat,sleep etc. Within my set mileage on my route.

Ctrl + T

is the way I handle it as well when using Basecamp.

I use Google maps to find a specific location, I right click at that location and select "What's Here?" from the context menu. Google Maps then generates lat/lon (51.481036, -0.005865) for the location I've selected. I copy and paste that data using Ctrl + T in Basecamp and it generates a waypoint. I then re-name the waypoint to something useful.

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(2) Nuvi 1450LMT + 3597LMTHD + 2557LMT Boston MA

Same Same

uber360 wrote:

is the way I handle it as well when using Basecamp.

I use Google maps to find a specific location, I right click at that location and select "What's Here?" from the context menu. Google Maps then generates lat/lon (51.481036, -0.005865) for the location I've selected. I copy and paste that data using Ctrl + T in Basecamp and it generates a waypoint. I then re-name the waypoint to something useful.

That is the basic steps I outlined in my previous reply. Except I assumed he already had the coordinates.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Yeah,

IME, it's a good way to pickup data from the map and get it into the GPS, assuming you're a Basecamp user.

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(2) Nuvi 1450LMT + 3597LMTHD + 2557LMT Boston MA