Lawmakers introduce bill on warrantless GPS tracking

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57575796-83/lawmakers-intro...

A bipartisan group of lawmakers has introduced a new bill, known as the Geolocation Privacy and Surveillance Act, to force law enforcement to obtain a warrant to track suspects with GPS devices.
The bill, which was introduced to Congress yesterday, is sponsored by Reps. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) and Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.), as well as Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and House judiciary committee ranking member Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.). If passed, it would provide a "legal framework" that provides clear guidelines on when and how GPS devices can be accessed and used.
"New technologies are making it increasingly easy to track and log the location of individuals. We need to make sure laws are keeping up with technology to protect our privacy," Chaffetz said. "Put simply, the government and law enforcement should not be able to track somebody indefinitely without their knowledge or consent or without obtaining a warrant from a judge." (read more from link.

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Originator of Keeping Your Windmill Alive. Live in MA & have a cooking website. 6 yr. member. http://kitchentoysmakecookingfun.blogspot.com/

New Bill

I agree 100%

far more important things that they should be concerned about

There are so many far more important things that they should be concerned about and wasting the Congresses time on than this, like the gigantic deficit and out of control spending. mad

Those things will cause all of us much greater problems in the long run than worrying about tracking someone with GPS.

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GM Built-in Navigation system - Samsung S6 Edge+ Smartphone with Garmin Viago, Google Maps & HERE Apps

I Agree

But there is still the ODB2 computers in our newer cars that can tract us and shut off our engine. Where will it end?

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Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

i'd like to know

ahsumtoy wrote:

But there is still the ODB2 computers in our newer cars that can tract us and shut off our engine. Where will it end?

I'd like to know where you picked up that little gem. GM cars have a link to the control circuits through On Star. They don't shut off the engine, they reduce the fuel feed so the car slows down, then gets no more fuel than what would be used at idle. Cutting off the ignition or stopping the engine would cripple many important features such as power steering, power brakes, heating and air conditioning along with a great many others that could cause an even bigger hazard than a speeding car.

But that feature(?) is only on GM cars, it's also very handy when they want to repossess the car because they can keep you from driving it anywhere - and it can't be disabled as On Star is integrated into the vehicle electronics.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Oh come on

Box Car wrote:

and it can't be disabled as On Star is integrated into the vehicle electronics.

I don't have, and none of my close friends or family have, On-Star; but I bet it is fairly easy to disable without any effect on the rest of the vehicle electronics (On-Star even disabled may On-Star units (that customers had paid for) themselves several years ago when the the Analog telephone systems they were foolishly based on were phased out). Find the antenna cable for the cell connection and cut it and it is disabled. A cell phone jammer would also be effective. I very much expect that there is even a fuse that you could pull that would cut off the On-Star radio and related systems without affecting the EMC or OBDII systems.

An alternate opinion ...

rjrsw wrote:

There are so many far more important things that they should be concerned about and wasting the Congresses time on than this, like the gigantic deficit and out of control spending. mad

Those things will cause all of us much greater problems in the long run than worrying about tracking someone with GPS.

I disagree ... our spending is a very serious immediate and long term problem, but if you ignore the fact that people are violating your privacy, then in the long run that privacy will be non-existent and with it will go any sense of liberty that you may have had. Fortunately, this doesn't look like it will distract them too much.

CC

Multitask

CookieCutter wrote:
rjrsw wrote:

There are so many far more important things that they should be concerned about and wasting the Congresses time on than this, like the gigantic deficit and out of control spending. mad

Those things will cause all of us much greater problems in the long run than worrying about tracking someone with GPS.

I disagree ... our spending is a very serious immediate and long term problem, but if you ignore the fact that people are violating your privacy, then in the long run that privacy will be non-existent and with it will go any sense of liberty that you may have had. Fortunately, this doesn't look like it will distract them too much.

CC

For sure. Both are important issues and both deserve attention. There is no reason that privacy issues and fiscal policy cannot both be dealt with by the same Congress. A privacy bill such as this seems like it would gather support and cooperation relatively easily when compared to the difficult and divergent ideas about fiscal policy.

Wow! Congress can agree on something...

...well at least some bipartisan members can. Hopefully they'll be able to round up enough Reps to pass the bill.

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Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

Walk and chew gum simultaneously?

rjrsw wrote:

There are so many far more important things that they should be concerned about and wasting the Congresses time on than this, like the gigantic deficit and out of control spending. mad

Those things will cause all of us much greater problems in the long run than worrying about tracking someone with GPS.

It's generally accepted that Congress Critters aren't exactly what one would call the cream of the crop, but surely they can process more than one issue at a time? Or am I giving them too much credit?

I don't think Ostar can

Disable your vehicle with out your permission and with proof that you own the vehicle.

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3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

which goes to show

Frovingslosh wrote:
Box Car wrote:

and it can't be disabled as On Star is integrated into the vehicle electronics.

I don't have, and none of my close friends or family have, On-Star;

Do you really inderstand how the On Star system is integrated into the car's electronic systems or are you just saying what you believe is true?

The antenna used on most GM products is the "shark fin" which is 3 or 4 units in one. Now which is the GPS, the radio, Sirius/XM and On Star?
The On Star system consists of several different pieces, the cellular phone is just one piece and it is part of the chip set making up the entertainment system. The modem, which is where the signals are received, interfaces directly with several of the control busses as it not only receives commands from On Star, it is used to send diagnostic information back to On Star for distribution to both vehicle owners and dealers. What you are confusing with your statement regarding On Star "disabling" systems when the AMPS Cellular system was decommissioned is decidedly misplaced. It wasn't On Star, it was Verizon which stopped supporting that particular technology.

Now, GM has announced that current production systems will also stop "functioning" when On Star switches carriers from Verizon to ATT. The equipment won't necessarily stop functioning, but the change in carriers means a change in the underlying technology from CDMA to GSM. I haven't heard how long On Star will support the two technologies, but they have stated their primary focus will be on GSM which provides them a platform supported in more countries than CDMA. But then you knew all that didn't you.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Most of that I didn't know,

Most of that I didn't know, except the fact that GSM is a worldwide standard while Verizon in the US and both Bell and Telus in Canada still offer CDMA networks. In the case of both Bell and Telus however, they also have set up GSM networks, leaving the CDMA networks for legacy phones. This means only Verizon is still bucking a worldwide standard.

On topic, while this bill has a lot of merit, it is only one grain in the jar of sand. You still have all the other crap to deal with in today's surveillance state like red light cameras, surveillance drones and so on. Thus my comments in the "when you're being watched and recorded" thread apply here as well.

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"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

Installation

Box Car wrote:

The On Star system consists of several different pieces, the cellular phone is just one piece and it is part of the chip set making up the entertainment system.

I must be "behind the times" -- last time I read anything about OnStar, it was in a metal box that was installed in one of the rear quarter panels.

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KD5XB in DM84

Be afraid...

very afraid!!!

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"Backward, turn backward, oh time in your flight, make me a child again, just for tonight."

The days of privacy are long

The days of privacy are long gone. Even if not GPS, they have other ways of tracking like cell phone tower location, turnpike tolls, highway cameras, "black boxes" in vehicles and so on.

Will this pass easily?

How easily this will pass depends on how much other unrelated crap others try to tack onto it.
That's the way the government works. Someone comes up with a good idea and you tack your junk onto it for your own gain. Eventually the one good idea becomes a bill with a hundred other things attached that nobody wants.

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Live every day like it's your last. Some day you'll be right - Benny Hill

I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong but

our GPS do not emit transmissions. They are a satellite RECEIVERS. Cell phones, however are transponding devices that are always looking for the closest tower. They can triangulate to find you.

Receiver

GeoC320 wrote:

our GPS do not emit transmissions. They are a satellite RECEIVERS. Cell phones, however are transponding devices that are always looking for the closest tower. They can triangulate to find you.

I wonder if that signal our Nuvi's receive can be tracked back? Like the sender can detect where the signals are being received at??

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Garmin Nuvi 255W

Only if

benparlament wrote:

I wonder if that signal our Nuvi's receive can be tracked back? Like the sender can detect where the signals are being received at??

someone can get physical access to your nuvi and retrieve the track log from it. Otherwise no way to track it.

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Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon