What To Do When Asked for ZIP Code at Pump

 

Canadians have a postal code, that's totally different than the American Zip Codes. eg: M2L 1Z8

Some gas pumps ask for your Zip code when you swipe at the pump and the Zip you enter must be the same as on the mailing address for your card.

One suggestion, was to use the numbers in the postal code and add two zeros on the end. I somehow recall that it worked many years ago, near Florida.

However, on my last trip, to Branson, that did not work. We had to prepay which meant we had to guess at $50 and when we had less than that they had to credit us. Needless to say, that's not a procedure I like.

Has anyone had any success with an alternative method?

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350
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Idea

Have you contacted your credit card company. Maybe they can associate a US-like zip code to your account. I have often added multiple addresses to my credit cards for delivery purposes of goods bought online.

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RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

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GPSgeek wrote:

Has anyone had any success with an alternative method?

What worked for me in a few places last summer was to enter my postal code using the numbers that corresponded to the letters on a telephone keypad, e.g., your example 'M2L 1Z8' would be '625198'. (Usually the pump ignored the last number, but didn't complain.) I didn't keep count, but my guess is that it worked maybe one out of every three times I tried it.

Support for Canadian credit cards in the U.S. is improving, but it is still very inconsistent from one chain to another and even from state to state when dealing with the same chain.

Works for Me

GPSgeek wrote:

Canadians have a postal code, that's totally different than the American Zip Codes. eg: M2L 1Z8

Some gas pumps ask for your Zip code when you swipe at the pump and the Zip you enter must be the same as on the mailing address for your card.

One suggestion, was to use the numbers in the postal code and add two zeros on the end. I somehow recall that it worked many years ago, near Florida.

However, on my last trip, to Branson, that did not work. We had to prepay which meant we had to guess at $50 and when we had less than that they had to credit us. Needless to say, that's not a procedure I like.

Has anyone had any success with an alternative method?

We travel to Florida and back twice each year and using the numbers only of the postal code and adding two 00's works for me each time. I tank at major gas stations which may make a difference. cheap brands may use a different system.

--
Wanted -Woman with GPS -send picture of GPS

Just Wondering

Do the pumps in Canada ask for a postal/zip code?? If so, do they accept zip codes from the USA??

Code

This really only occurs when you are at a "Pay at the pump" station.

I usually go inside and tell them the situation and they activate the pump for me and then when done filling up go back to pay with my CC.

I find after driving for a few hours the exercise is needed and welcomed, I am not too lazy to make the trek into the store.

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

Try this

Select >Pay inside.
Zip not required.

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

The first time

I encountered them asking for Zip Code, I thought it was for Demographics purposes. I entered some obscure Zip Code in Pennsylvania, and was promptly rejected. I had to pre pay. I learned.

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"Advice to children crossing the street: Damn the lights. Watch the cars. The lights ain't never killed nobody." - Moms Mabley Garmin StreetPilot C330, Garmin NUVI 765T, Garmin DriveSmart 60LMT

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SilverRhino wrote:

Do the pumps in Canada ask for a postal/zip code?? If so, do they accept zip codes from the USA??

I have not encountered a pump in Canada that has asked for my postal code. However, most (if not all) pay-at-the-pump pumps in Canada have a sticker on them saying that credit cards from outside Canada may not work and to go see the attendant if that happens.

try zeros

GPSgeek wrote:

Canadians have a postal code, that's totally different than the American Zip Codes. eg: M2L 1Z8

Some gas pumps ask for your Zip code when you swipe at the pump and the Zip you enter must be the same as on the mailing address for your card.

One suggestion, was to use the numbers in the postal code and add two zeros on the end. I somehow recall that it worked many years ago, near Florida.

However, on my last trip, to Branson, that did not work. We had to prepay which meant we had to guess at $50 and when we had less than that they had to credit us. Needless to say, that's not a procedure I like.

Has anyone had any success with an alternative method?

I've been told entering 000000 works. But I've never tried it.

--
I drive, therefore I am happy. Rodeo, wildlife and nature photography rodeophoto.ca

Pay Inside

At one station, they actually had posted that if you didn't want to enter the zipcode, select pay inside and it isn't required.

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Garmin Nuvi 2450

You can go inside and pay.

You can go inside and pay. No zip code require.

I'll second the suggestion

I'll second the suggestion of calling your credit card company. Zip code is being used as a sort of weak 5 digit PIN. What you need is a 5 digit number you can use as an alternative.

Try too many random numbers and you could have a fraud hold put on your card.

That's a real pain in the a..

I had no problems punching in 00000 at all Flying J but unfortunately that didn't work at the Sunoco stations. I called my credit card company and that didn't help any.

Solution : I got myself a US credit card thats billed to a US address. The credit card is also very convenient when making purchases on Amazon or EBay. It's better late than never but I should have done this a long time ago.

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Nüvi 255WT with nüMaps Lifetime North America born on 602117815 / Nüvi 3597LMTHD born on 805972514 / I love Friday’s except when I’m on holidays ~ canuk

Debit or credit.

Kind of shooting from the hip on this one. I seem to think if you select Debit it wont ask for the zip, but asks for a pin # .... or the other way around try the debit vs Credit selection.

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Jerry...Jacksonville,Fl Nüvi1450,Nuvi650,Nuvi 2495 and Mapsource.

Zipcode

The purpose of your zip code is to make shore you are the owner on the CC. One atnother idea is use your CC/Debit with pin

Problems with Z|ip Code Requirements

To answer the question about Canadian requirements - I have never been required to enter a Postal Code anywhere in Alberta when paying at the pump. As we have letters in our Postal Code, I think people would get ticked trying to remember the numneric equivalent for J (10) or S (19) razz

An issue with "paying inside" is that stations in Vegas want to charge an initial amount and then hold your card until you have filled up. I don't want to leave my card with anyone!

I was told about using the digits in our Postal Code and adding 000 but it didn't work for me. The only thing that has worked for me is using my Debit Card, where I have to enter a PIN.

Payback

It's payback for all the times the Yanks have gotten Canadian coins in their change (though with the current exchange rate, that's better for the Yanks!). wink

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DanielT wrote:

I think people would get ticked trying to remember the numneric equivalent for J (10) or S (19) razz

I saw your smiley, but just to avoid confusion what (sometimes) worked for me was not

A -> 1
B -> 2
...
Z -> 26

but rather the letters that appear on a telephone keypad

[ABC] -> 2
[DEF] -> 3
[GHI] -> 4
[JKL] -> 5
[MNO] -> 6
[PQRS] -> 7
[TUV] -> 8
[WXYZ] -> 9

In most cases the letters were right there on the buttons.

DanielT wrote:

The only thing that has worked for me is using my Debit Card, where I have to enter a PIN.

Did the bank ding you for an Interac/Plus surcharge? That would be my concern.

~

perpster wrote:

It's payback for all the times the Yanks have gotten Canadian coins in their change (though with the current exchange rate, that's better for the Yanks!). wink

mrgreen

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Nüvi 255WT with nüMaps Lifetime North America born on 602117815 / Nüvi 3597LMTHD born on 805972514 / I love Friday’s except when I’m on holidays ~ canuk

Station insisted on prepayment

Melaqueman wrote:

This really only occurs when you are at a "Pay at the pump" station.

I usually go inside and tell them the situation and they activate the pump for me and then when done filling up go back to pay with my CC.

I find after driving for a few hours the exercise is needed and welcomed, I am not too lazy to make the trek into the store.

In my experience, the station would ask how much gas I wanted and they would want to put that on the card. In most cases, my wife would go in and wait, while I filled up and that was not a problem. However, around Louisville, KY, they insisted that she pay up front. We wanted a fillup and did not know how much gas we would need. She put $50 on card and then they had to credit for $16.99, when I used less than the $50. Not very good setup.

They say they have a lot of Gas and Runs in that area.

I agree that the exercise is good, but I I will not leave my credit card with anyone and having to prepay like they insisted is a major nuisance.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

No Postal Code Needed

SilverRhino wrote:

Do the pumps in Canada ask for a postal/zip code?? If so, do they accept zip codes from the USA??

Pumps in Canada do not ask for Postal Code or Zip Code, at least yet.

Almost all of our credit cards have the chip. On transactions in stores, we put the chip in the top or bottom of the charge card reader and enter a 4 digit pin. This is not the case at the pumps, so far.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Debit Not the Best Option

willdrad wrote:

The purpose of your zip code is to make shore you are the owner on the CC. One atnother idea is use your CC/Debit with pin

I use a US Funds Mastercard, from my Canadian bank, when I go to the US. If I treated it as a debit, the bank would treat it as a cash advance and they would immediately apply interest charges and likely any additional fees.

Otherwise, this might be a good choice.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Little Chance of Adding US Style ZIP

rkf wrote:

Have you contacted your credit card company. Maybe they can associate a US-like zip code to your account. I have often added multiple addresses to my credit cards for delivery purposes of goods bought online.

The Postal Code is a key part of the mail sorting system and it is highly unlikely that the banks would add anything extra.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Pay Back Could Be Right LMAO

perpster wrote:

It's payback for all the times the Yanks have gotten Canadian coins in their change (though with the current exchange rate, that's better for the Yanks!). wink

You could be onto something. The two currencies are running close to par now, with a bit of an advantage to the Canadian Dollar. 1-2% points, but not enough to get excited about.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Royal

Royal bank offers a cross border account through RBC Bank, a sub of RBC Royal Bank , that offers a US Visa debit and credit card. I just leave my US credit card set with my temp US address so I always have a Zip code to use. The debit card doesn't require a zip code when your at the pump.

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Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, DriveSmart 61, Garmin Backup Camera 40 and TomTom XXL540s.

exchange rate

When I drove to Alaska in 2008 my problem was not with credit cards in Canada but trying to pay with US dollars, it was a pain, some retailers balked at taking dollars, one was at a Mac Donald where the manager had to tell the clerk to accept payment even at another Mac Donald they adjusted for the exchange rate.

They also wanted to tax my 5 cartons of Marlboro until I threw a fit and spoke to a supervisor at the border, told him I bought the cigarettes in the US and I was going to smoke them in Alaska so why should I me made to pay Canadian import taxes.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Ahem,

flaco wrote:

When I drove to Alaska in 2008 my problem was not with credit cards in Canada but trying to pay with US dollars, it was a pain, some retailers balked at taking dollars

Oh, they'll take dollars - Canadian dollars - you know, the coin of the realm and all that. And would it surprise you to learn that the majority of US retailers farther than 50 km from the Canada-US border would look at us like we had two heads if we tried to pay for something with Canadian dollars?

flaco wrote:

They also wanted to tax my 5 cartons of Marlboro until I threw a fit and spoke to a supervisor at the border, told him I bought the cigarettes in the US and I was going to smoke them in Alaska so why should I me made to pay Canadian import taxes.

Are you a bonded carrier?

It's simple

flaco wrote:

They also wanted to tax my 5 cartons of Marlboro until I threw a fit and spoke to a supervisor at the border, told him I bought the cigarettes in the US and I was going to smoke them in Alaska so why should I me made to pay Canadian import taxes.

Entering another country as a visitor is a privilege and not a right. You must obey, follow the rules and regulations of that counrty and ignorance of the law isn't an excuse. That being said, if you disagree with the restrictions or obligations stay home or go elsewhere.

--
Nüvi 255WT with nüMaps Lifetime North America born on 602117815 / Nüvi 3597LMTHD born on 805972514 / I love Friday’s except when I’m on holidays ~ canuk

agree half way

VersatileGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:

When I drove to Alaska in 2008 my problem was not with credit cards in Canada but trying to pay with US dollars, it was a pain, some retailers balked at taking dollars

Oh, they'll take dollars - Canadian dollars - you know, the coin of the realm and all that. And would it surprise you to learn that the majority of US retailers farther than 50 km from the Canada-US border would look at us like we had two heads if we tried to pay for something with Canadian dollars?

flaco wrote:

They also wanted to tax my 5 cartons of Marlboro until I threw a fit and spoke to a supervisor at the border, told him I bought the cigarettes in the US and I was going to smoke them in Alaska so why should I me made to pay Canadian import taxes.

Are you a bonded carrier?

I kind of understand the cash problem for both Canadians and gringos when traveling in each other countries, I wonder how they manage in Europe with the € and the £

The tax on the cigarettes I do not understand, like I told the supervisor at the border, "you are not taxing me for the clothes I wear or what I have in my luggage, why my Marlboro’s should be treated any different" he then proceeded to let me thru without being taxed.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

one little problem

canuk wrote:
flaco wrote:

They also wanted to tax my 5 cartons of Marlboro until I threw a fit and spoke to a supervisor at the border, told him I bought the cigarettes in the US and I was going to smoke them in Alaska so why should I me made to pay Canadian import taxes.

Entering another country as a visitor is a privilege and not a right. You must obey, follow the rules and regulations of that counrty and ignorance of the law isn't an excuse. That being said, if you disagree with the restrictions or obligations stay home or go elsewhere.

The problem is I was going elsewhere and simply passing by.

Canadians should be glad you don’t work for the tourism ministry, or write visitor’s welcome brochures.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Pay at pump with Canadian credit cards

HI, I was in Florida last July and I went to Costco and gas up. I inserted my (CAN) American Express asked for the zip code. I asked the attendant and he told me to put all zeros (oooooo) and he punched zeros and the pump was ready to work.

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flaco wrote:

The tax on the cigarettes I do not understand, like I told the supervisor at the border, "you are not taxing me for the clothes I wear or what I have in my luggage, why my Marlboro’s should be treated any different" he then proceeded to let me thru without being taxed.

Alcohol, tobacco, and firearms always receive special scrutiny at a border crossing. That's the way it has been for a long, long time.

Also, bear in mind that given the price of cigarettes in Canada your 5 cartons of Marlboros would have a "street value" in excess of $500.

Clothes

flaco wrote:

The tax on the cigarettes I do not understand, like I told the supervisor at the border, "you are not taxing me for the clothes I wear or what I have in my luggage, why my Marlboro’s should be treated any different" he then proceeded to let me thru without being taxed.

Clothes and other personal items are not resold. Cigarettes are. The Canadians have a limit as to what may be brought into their country for personal use, You exceeded that limit so the agent was right is assessing a duty. The supervisor decided to waive the limit in your case. As to the amount you brought, did you think they may not be available in Alaska?

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Firearms

VersatileGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:

T

Alcohol, tobacco, and firearms always receive special scrutiny at a border crossing. That's the way it has been for a long, long time.

Also, bear in mind that given the price of cigarettes in Canada your 5 cartons of Marlboros would have a "street value" in excess of $500.

The firearms part is a major issue, in Canada, so be aware, if you try to cross the border in Canada with firearms, you're going to get major scrutiny and likely have the gun confiscated.

Many have tried and most have failed.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

humm

Box Car wrote:
flaco wrote:

The tax on the cigarettes I do not understand, like I told the supervisor at the border, "you are not taxing me for the clothes I wear or what I have in my luggage, why my Marlboro’s should be treated any different" he then proceeded to let me thru without being taxed.

Clothes and other personal items are not resold. Cigarettes are. The Canadians have a limit as to what may be brought into their country for personal use, You exceeded that limit so the agent was right is assessing a duty. The supervisor decided to waive the limit in your case. As to the amount you brought, did you think they may not be available in Alaska?

Clothes aren't' resold? guess you haven't checked eBay.

Remember I wasn't going to their country, just passing by with a truck hauling a camper. The Marlboro I bought 7 cartons at my local Seminole tribe reservation tax free to last me the whole trip there and back 12600 miles, I had no idea how much cigarettes are in Alaska or in Canada nor did I want to find out.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

but you were

flaco wrote:

Remember I wasn't going to their country, just passing by with a truck hauling a camper. The Marlboro I bought 7 cartons at my local Seminole tribe reservation tax free to last me the whole trip there and back 12600 miles, I had no idea how much cigarettes are in Alaska or in Canada nor did I want to find out.

You are still subject to Canadian immigration laws even though you aren't staying in their country. Just as Canadians have to pass through US Customs and Immigration and abide by our laws as they do, the same goes the other way as well. All you needed to do before going on your trip was to check the Canadian government website and you could have seen what is and isn't allowed. Our northern and southern borders are pretty lenient as far as proofs of citizenship, well at least they were, and there is a lot of mutual trust between our countries. But when you attempt to flout their requirements, they can get pretty sticky. You need to be thankful the Canadian customs supervisor listened to your whining and decided the better course of action would be to make an exception rather than enforce the laws as written. If you had been arrested for attempted smuggling, which you could have been, it would have taken someone from our State Department to rectify the mess. Taking what could be classified as contraband across a national border is very serious and you were extremely fortunate.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

no need to call Hillary

Box Car wrote:

You are still subject to Canadian immigration laws even though you aren't staying in their country. Just as Canadians have to pass through US Customs and Immigration and abide by our laws as they do, the same goes the other way as well. All you needed to do before going on your trip was to check the Canadian government website and you could have seen what is and isn't allowed. Our northern and southern borders are pretty lenient as far as proofs of citizenship, well at least they were, and there is a lot of mutual trust between our countries. But when you attempt to flout their requirements, they can get pretty sticky. You need to be thankful the Canadian customs supervisor listened to your whining and decided the better course of action would be to make an exception rather than enforce the laws as written. If you had been arrested for attempted smuggling, which you could have been, it would have taken someone from our State Department to rectify the mess. Taking what could be classified as contraband across a national border is very serious and you were extremely fortunate.

If you are visiting or moving to Canada the max is 200 cigarettes duty free, however if you are in transit that rules do not apply according to the border crossing website.

In-transit travel through Canada.

If you are an American resident, you can transport goods through Canada to the United States. To simplify the clearance process, carry three copies of the list of goods you are transporting. The list should include the description and value of the goods, as well as the serial numbers (if applicable). You should pack consumable goods such as alcohol, tobacco and food in containers that the border services officers can close and seal when you arrive.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5082-eng.html...

I did declare the cigarettes and the shotgun as prescribed by Canada's law, the border agent was in error when trying to tax the cigarettes and that is why the supervisor who better knew the law let me thru without taxing me and not because of any whining on my part.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

not an error on thier part

flaco wrote:

In-transit travel through Canada.

If you are an American resident, you can transport goods through Canada to the United States. To simplify the clearance process, carry three copies of the list of goods you are transporting. The list should include the description and value of the goods, as well as the serial numbers (if applicable). You should pack consumable goods such as alcohol, tobacco and food in containers that the border services officers can close and seal when you arrive.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5082-eng.html...

I did declare the cigarettes and the shotgun as prescribed by Canada's law, the border agent was in error when trying to tax the cigarettes and that is why the supervisor who better knew the law let me thru without taxing me and not because of any whining on my part.

Tobacco products

As a visitor or a temporary resident, you may import, free of duty and taxes, all of the following amounts of tobacco products, as long as these items are in your possession when you arrive in Canada:

200 cigarettes;
50 cigars;
200 grams of manufactured tobacco; and
200 tobacco sticks.

For a visit of short duration, these quantities may be limited to amounts that are appropriate in respect of the nature, purpose, and duration of the visit.
http://www.cbsa.gc.ca/travel-voyage/ifvc-rpvc-eng.html#a2

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Imports or duty free

If you carry the cigs cigars alcohol save your receipts to show that you purchased it in the states and you are going to smoke and consume it in another state. You can purchase 1 carton of smokes 1 up to 1.75 l bottle of alcohol or wine without paying duty, if you stay at least 3days in Canada. Usually they ask to see receipts only and most of the time they don't waste time checking. However they can and will every crossing is a bit different and different procedures. The reason I know this, I'm a tour bus driver and make crossing all over Canada. Going into Canada don't take pepper spray as it's illegal ( felony ) same as dui it's also a felony.

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John_nuvi_

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Transport across the border may be illegal for pepper (bear) spray. But I have a can of 1% in my truck when I'm out in remote areas working, and it is legal to carry.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

@ Juggernaut

It's legal to have bear spray in your possession in Canada. It's considered illegal and can become a prohibited weapon if used in an inappropriiate manner (example spraying someone in the face and then robbing them.)

The possession of pepper spray as law enforcement officers carry is illegal throughout Canada.

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Nüvi 255WT with nüMaps Lifetime North America born on 602117815 / Nüvi 3597LMTHD born on 805972514 / I love Friday’s except when I’m on holidays ~ canuk

Let's get back on topic.

Zip code request at fuel pumps.

Thanks!

~Angela

second the motion

Good idea Angela about getting back on topic, seems like some here just want to argue for the sake of being argumentative.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

On Topic

Does anyone have experience in Mexico with Pay-At-Pump?

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

Tequila

spokybob wrote:

Does anyone have experience in Mexico with Pay-At-Pump?

Tequila

--
All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players. Rush

Lost satellite reception ?

Seems a few did and got this topic way off course. When possible make a u-turn. smile

I don't think you want to PAP in Mexico

Might have a heck of a charge bill by the time you got home

Experience has been that

Experience has been that some pumps will take the 00000 others will take the three numbers in Canadian postal codes along with two 0s.
Mastercard and Visa do not have any suggestions on what to do when we called them and talked to supervisors. I use a Canadian American Dollar Mastercard
Most places in 2011 south of Interstate 40 required that you either pay first by going into station and selecting an amount on your credit card. Make sure that nobody grabs the hose before you get back.

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jim m

never get asked that

I use my cards all the time, but never have I had to put in my zip code at the pump! Where do they ask this information??

--
Unless you are the lead sled dog, the view never changes. I is retard... every day is Saturday! I still own the StreetPilot c340, and the Garmin Nuvi 765t, but upgraded to the NO "recalculating", 3590 LMT.

Where you ask?

In large cities. Memphis and St. Louis are two places. But I never been prompted on my side of Illinois.

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1490LMT 1450LMT 295w
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