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Who Has Given Up Their Camera For Their Smartphone?

 

Personal Disclaimer: for me, the quality of smartphone cameras is a LONG way from what I want to trade even my simple point-and-shoot for my SG2's camera feature. There used to be a phrase that went "It's all about the glass" referring to the lens. The better the lens, the better the picture...but I digress.

For a quick pic to remember my parking spot at the airport or something else I don't plan to keep, it's nice to have. However, while I personally won't be giving up any of my cameras for the camera feature on my SG2, I realize many other folks have.

Have you?

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 GO 930, VIA 1535TM, GPSmap 60CS, Android w/Google Maps & TomTom USA, BMW built-in
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anyone who is a casual

anyone who is a casual photographer I imagine.

That does not include me. U can't put a $400. camera into a cell phone. But then......maybe a cell phone in the camera might make "some" sense.

one thing they're great for

Shooter wrote:

For a quick pic to remember my parking spot at the airport or something else I don't plan to keep, it's nice to have.

Documenting accidents when the idiot behind you decides they want to push you through the intersection as the light changes.

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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." -- John F. Kennedy, 35th U.S. president

an opinion

The best camera is the one you have with you. If it's a good camera and you have it with you when you see something you want a picture of, of course that's better than a cell phone camera. However in a pinch

For a comparison of various smart phone camera's, Read This

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If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

For day to day

I use the phone, EVO 4G. If I am doing anything even mildly important I use the camera.

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

no way

I keep a 10MP Cannon point and shoot in the car for simple stuff and for the more serious photography I use a Nikon D80. I don't think any smartphones will match either camera.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

I have a dumb phone

I can make voice calls, text messages and take "lousy" pictures and it has Bluetooth. It cost $29.95.
My service cost me "approx" $17/mo for roughly 175 minutes. I've never used that much time.
I wear my watch (15 years old and keeps perfect time and always on my wrist), use my GPS (with bluetooth), keep my Canon Camera in car.

I guess I'm just Old Fashioned !!!

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MrKenFL- "Money can't buy you happiness .. But it does bring you a more pleasant form of misery." NUVI 260, Nuvi 1490LMT & Nuvi 2595LMT all with 2014.4 maps !

More and more

It is just so much easier to snap a pic with my phone than dragging out a separate camera.

And the quality is comparable.

I haven't used my actual digital camera in probably a year.

Who Has Given Up Their Camera For Their Smartphone?

I have never been much of a camera guy. And it is not that I don't like them, but for one reason or another I just chose to not spend my money on that. Fortunately, since getting married about 18 years ago my wife has been good about taking photographs. When I switched her phone service from Naxtel to T-Mobile almost three years ago she was quite interested in the Samsung Memoir. It has a 8 megapixel camera. It is not a real smartphone, but rather a feature phone. So, this past winter when she and I looked at new phones for her, she wanted at least an 8 megapixel camera function. That narrowed the choices quite a bit, but I ended up buying her an HTC Sensation. I also bought her a new stand alone Olympus Tough TG-610 14 MP Digital Camera because it is more rugged and water resistant.

JMHO

MrKenFL wrote:

I can make voice calls, text messages and take "lousy" pictures and it has Bluetooth. It cost $29.95.
My service cost me "approx" $17/mo for roughly 175 minutes. I've never used that much time.
I wear my watch (15 years old and keeps perfect time and always on my wrist), use my GPS (with bluetooth), keep my Canon Camera in car.

I guess I'm just Old Fashioned !!!

You're frugal. If you were old fashioned, you'd be using paper maps, an abacus and a scratch pad and a Brownie box camera and not even own a cell phone :)

The iPhone 4S camera specs.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Never

A real camera has just too many operating and creative features for me to ever even think of giving it up.

Recession

MrKenFL wrote:

I can make voice calls, text messages and take "lousy" pictures and it has Bluetooth. It cost $29.95.
My service cost me "approx" $17/mo for roughly 175 minutes. I've never used that much time.
I wear my watch (15 years old and keeps perfect time and always on my wrist), use my GPS (with bluetooth), keep my Canon Camera in car.

I guess I'm just Old Fashioned !!!

Now I know why the economy is stagnant wink

Like S.C. Senator Earnest “Fritz” Hollings’ may say
"There is Not Too Much Consumming Going On Out There"

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

I may stop buying point and

I may stop buying point and shoot cameras and use smartphone camera instead. Other than that, no smartphone camera can replace DSLR.

convenience

Smartphone cameras are for convenience, not picture quality.

apples and bananas

Is like trying to compare a smartphone camera to a DSLR

The smartphone cameras suffer from the same problem as most point and shoot cameras, they can "capture a moment" but they can't "capture the moment".

By not having a viewfinder they rely on the screen to compose the shot and there is always a lag between what you saw on the screen and the final photo.

So regardless how many gazillions megapixels they put on the smartphone it always be as good as a point and shoot, unless they figure a way to drill a hole on the screen so you can see what the lens is seeing.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

Wife = Yes/No; Me = Yes

My wife is about to give up her point-n-shoot for her camera, but her DSLR is not about to be replaced anytime soon.

Considering I've never had a dedicated camera aside from a disposable on vacation I guess I have.

let me think

It must be this same people who exchange traditional house for tent. After all it is practically this same:

- you have roof over your head,
- protects you form weather,
- you can put furniture inside,
- cost a lot less than building even smallest house,
- etc.

But still, somehow it isn't as good for everyday living as old fashion house.

Cell phone camera

I have switched. Always have cell phone. Rarely have camera

Wimp

Ha ha ha
Sure hope you dont lose ur job. Your attitude will change

Not yet, waiting for higer

Not yet, waiting for higer resolution on smart phones.

It's the loose nut behind the lens...

...that makes the difference.

I love the camera in my iPhone 4S -- good enough for a lot of things, automagically includes location (and tweets with location if I want it to).

But there are other times, like last night at a party, where I wanted some pictures, and I knew the strong backlighting was going to confuse the poor little phone, and I didn't have the good camera (the big Nikon), where I could go manual and get the image I wanted.

Serious macro work is another example. My iPhone, particularly with the photojojo macro lens, does a pretty good job. But it can't touch the Nikon with a real macro lens.

Oh, and that loose nut behind the lens, knowing what your gear can and can't do, still makes a difference.

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2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

I'll keep my camera. The

I'll keep my camera. The cell phone is great to take prices of items so I can find the best price out there.

I use my iPhone 4 camera

I use my iPhone 4 camera with decent results. I wished the zoom function was a little stronger. I really haven't used a good camera since my Pentax. I'm not much of a photographer so I don't really take advantage of a really good camera. The iPhones camera does pretty good and since I always have it with me I have found I take more pictures than I used to. I also like the ability that a smartphone camera brings in that you can always have the pictures with you.

Use my iPhone but still use my G12

Not like gps, smart phone can never replace a stand alone camera especially DSLR.

I agree about the loose nut behing the camera

I have been doing photography for 30 years as a serious hobby. I have $4k worth of Nikon Bodies and lenses, flash and other acceeories. I totally agree anout learning your equipment. I have a $175 small 8meg pixel camera and I'll put pictures that I have taken with my 12 meg pixel $1600 Nikon. I must tave taken 500 to 1000 shots with the little Nikon playing with and learning the settings before I showed anyone the first picture. Learn the equipment and you'll amaze with your pictures

They Both Can Have their Place

I will not give up my Digital Camera for the SmartPhone camera for most things. Like others, I'll use my SmartPhone to take quick pictures of parking location, product that I want to research more, or other general pictures to be used as mental notes. For that vacation, family event, bike trip and things like that, I'll always pack the Digital...

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And now, back to your regularly scheduled forum - already in progress . . .

I'm like most

I'll use my dumb phone for quick spontaneous pictures since I always have the phone with me. Any special occasions, digital camera is the preference.

I'll be using the digital camera a lot the next two months with numerous graduations, a wedding, and two get togethers with various extended family members.

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Garmin Nuvi 2450

Let ME drive!

Modern point-and-shoot digital cameras are pretty amazing. The imaging sensors in many high-end phones are better than low-and mid-range digital cameras from a few years ago.

But they're full of assumptions -- on focus, on exposure, on everything that makes (or breaks) an image.

Deviate from the average -- average lighting, average exposure, a subject that is not an imitation of a gray card, and you've got problems.

That's where it's really useful to turn off the automation (or force it to behave the way YOU want).

Let ME drive!

Quick examples -- strong backlighting (overriding exposure or forcing wide bracketing). Controlling depth of field by forcing a particular lens aperture and focus (and let the camera choose the shutter speed). Controlling the presentation of action or motion in the image -- for example by using a fast shutter speed to freeze moving water, or by using a slow shutter speed to deliberately blur it.

Yeah, it requires thought, it requires knowing your axe, and if you're shooting anything other than still lifes or architecture, you have to be able to do these things quickly. With digital at least you can set the camera to bracket automatically, and you don't have to frantically reload after 36...

I love having the camera in the iPhone 4S in my pocket for those quick random things. But I wouldn't trade it for the Nikon, which even though it's fairly new, still uses Nikon lenses older than my kids...

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

my favorite

k6rtm wrote:

But I wouldn't trade it for the Nikon, which even though it's fairly new, still uses Nikon lenses older than my kids...

My favorite to mount on my Nikon D80 is the 80-200mm 2.8fD AF, it dates back to my film days, that lens alone cost more than a iPhone

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7

Depends on the use

There are starting to be "DSR-a-like" programs coming out for Android that do give more options and better performance for the stock camera, but--even with nifties like HDR Camera and Camera Zoom and Fast Burst Camera (to give examples of non-stock camera apps for Android that let the smartphone camera do more than the stock camera app)--it's still something I'd use primarily for casual use...the same stuff I'd use an old-style cheapie 35mm or Polaroid instant or 110 camera for.

(And oh my, am I dating myself by that 110 camera ref grin Probably by the Polaroid camera ref too grin)

To do real, SERIOUS photography...yes, I'd definitely want a pro DSLR camera, much as if I were doing professional survey work I'd want a surveyor-quality GPS. My main issue is explaining to the SO WHY I should get six hundred dollars US worth of camera (which I can replace lenses on if I want, and has true HDR, and which I got oh-sooo-spoiled on with the analog versions when I took photography in high school...).

(And before folks note that smartphones are expensive...in our case we not only got ours at a discount, but as a "buy one get one free" special which was still less than $200 all in all grin)

no comparison

I don't think you are talking about my SLR camera.. are you?

Camera With You -

The best pictures are taken because you had a camera when something happened, not the quality of the camera. I prefer my DSLR to any smart phone camera but I don't carry it around all the time. The phone is with me and I use that camera when I need one.

A good trick to use - turn the GPSr on in your smart phone and while you are using another camera, click 1 picture of your subject or scene with the phone camera. You will now have the coordinates of your location easily recognizable from the picture. Use this as a reference for where the pictures were taken. I did this all over Taiwan - on a 4 week trip - and have no problem remembering where I took the pictures.

geotagging

trigon wrote:

The best pictures are taken because you had a camera when something happened, not the quality of the camera. I prefer my DSLR to any smart phone camera but I don't carry it around all the time. The phone is with me and I use that camera when I need one.

A good trick to use - turn the GPSr on in your smart phone and while you are using another camera, click 1 picture of your subject or scene with the phone camera. You will now have the coordinates of your location easily recognizable from the picture. Use this as a reference for where the pictures were taken. I did this all over Taiwan - on a 4 week trip - and have no problem remembering where I took the pictures.

think some digital cameras have geotagging features, so no need to turn on GPSr manually.

Amazingly good camera

Obviously I can't replace my multiple SLR & DSLR bodies and lenses from wide to long telephone and all of the other bells and whistles with a cell phone camera, but I have repeatedly been amazed at how good the 8mp camera in my iPhone 4s actually is. I'm much rather have it with me when I just need a few snaps, than haul our the full kit. Streaming these snaps to iCloud places them on my laptop instantly so I can do final processing there if needed or send them to a client, or facebook.

Can you have too many cameras? I think not!

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Nuvi 2595LMT, Nuvi 1490T, Nuvi 260, GPSMAP 195

Too Many? I Think Not 2

rocknicehunter wrote:

Can you have too many cameras? I think not!

Isn't "too many cameras" like "too many GPSrs?" wink

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 GO 930, VIA 1535TM, GPSmap 60CS, Android w/Google Maps & TomTom USA, BMW built-in

Still use "real" camera

Phone is certainly handy since it is always with me but even the best phone cameras can't handle the darker scenes and indoor shots even the cheapest cameras can handle.

Still use both

different uses

I use my camera phone for a quick documentation. But I use my separate camera for a high-quality image with optical zoom.

--
nüvi 750 & 760

Well...

Shooter wrote:
rocknicehunter wrote:

Can you have too many cameras? I think not!

Isn't "too many cameras" like "too many GPSrs?" wink

I have a lot of cameras but only 4 GPSrs, and the iPhone is the only one that is both combined in one... So far.

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Nuvi 2595LMT, Nuvi 1490T, Nuvi 260, GPSMAP 195

"Only 4?" ;-)

rocknicehunter wrote:
Shooter wrote:
rocknicehunter wrote:

Can you have too many cameras? I think not!

Isn't "too many cameras" like "too many GPSrs?" wink

I have a lot of cameras but only 4 GPSrs, and the iPhone is the only one that is both combined in one... So far.

"Only 4" GPSrs? wink

The latest flurry of cellphone debate made me think of this thread. I missed this comment when it was first posted.

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 GO 930, VIA 1535TM, GPSmap 60CS, Android w/Google Maps & TomTom USA, BMW built-in

Traveling

I only use my phone camera when I travel so I can post the pics easily rather than transferring them to my computer

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ChefDon

Old saying

As one poster said for a casual shot to document something a phone camera will work fine, however for anything serious, forget it. The old saying goes if you have a $500 camera and a $10 lens you'll get $10 pictures. I found this to be true, especially during the many years I did festival photography. My lenses were cheap compared to what some of the wildlife and sports photographers use and I still had two or three lenses that were in the $700 neighborhood. Not to mention an external flash that would reach out 60 plus feet.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Why Choose?

I have two pockets, I carry both.

They have improved over the years, but...

Smartphone cameras have come a long way from the early cell phone cameras. For me they are fine for quick snapshots and to document things here and there. But when I want to capture a worthwhile picture or get a little artsy (and I don't mean goofy overlays and filters), the features, flexibility and picture quality produced by a DSLR are way above that of any smartphone. Low light performance also, is in a different league with a DSLR. For those reasons I won't make a smartphone my only camera any time soon. Megapixels alone do not make a great picture.

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Garmin Nüvi 660 & 3490LMT with ecoRoute HD, Nüvi 855 gone to GPS heaven

I recently updated my phone

I recently updated my phone from a Samsung Galaxy SII Skyrocket to the new Galaxy S4. The camera on the S4 is tons better than the SII. I was never a big fan of camera phones but it was always nice to be able to capture a shot you would have otherwise missed because you don't carry a regular camera with you all the time.

I don't think a camera phone will ever replace my regular camera in places where I know I'm going to want to take photo's, but for those photo ops that pop up unexpectedly from time to time they are pretty good.

--
. Nuvi 2460LMT, Zumo 550, Garmin preloaded into my Jeep, Beltronics Pro 500 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N (Garmin) built into my Jeep. .

not yet

Not yet. Quality in lower light just not there...yet! Still have phone with me more than camera though.

smart phone cameras are just so darn convenient

I have a nice Canon point and shoot but I stopped carrying it since I've have a smart phone.

The biggest thing users can do to improve the quality of their smart phone photos is to clean the fingerprints and lint off the lens before shooting.

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Are we there yet? 1490LMT

Camero vs iPhone/iPod

While the cameras in my iPod 4 and iPhone are decent for "point and shoot" situations, they will never take the place of a good camera.

This past summer I was on vacation and there were some Puffins about 400 or more feet away resting. My Canon camera with a 30x optical and 60x digital zoom brought them close enough to see them well.

Another location our tour guide pointed out the direction of where the airport is. I could not really see it, but took two shots at full optical and digital zoom which actually had me see the planes sitting there. Turned out the distance was 4 miles away, as the crow flies.

Try and duplicate these two situations with a phone camera!

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Nuvi 855LMT and Nuvi 3790LMT

Yea right

I give up my Smartphone for my camera

I would use my smartphone

I would use my smartphone camera for quick shots of stuff at stores as a reminder to do research before purchase. Since I have the smartphone with me at all times it helps to take opportunity pictures but for more serious photos for memories and photo album I would still use my Nikon D90.

As someone said earlier in

As someone said earlier in the thread - the best camera for the shot is the one you have with you. Which in most cases is the phone. That said I wouldn't go on holiday or to a wedding/birthday just carrying my phone. wink But for everyday unexpected shots, accidents etc., most phone cameras are fine.

Convenience, but no replacement

The smartphone camera is convenient, and not bad, but it is no replacement for a real camera.

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><> Glenn <>< Garmin eTrex, nüvi 1390/GTM-26, nüvi 2595/GTM-60 "A person's a person, no matter how small", Dr. Seuss.
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