US Travelers warned NOT to rely on GPS

 
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Interesting, but the point

Interesting, but the point is worth mentioning, never go onto unpaved roads in an area where you are not familar.

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. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Don't use "shortest route"

It's simple if you set your preferences to avoid unpaved roads or even if you use "fastest route" instead of "shortest route". Shortest often takes people onto unpaved and impassable roads. It's a very poor setting to use.

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GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

You can't fix stupidity

Unfortunately it is becoming more common place that we rely on these devices.
You can not fix stupidity and the lack of common sense.

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Nuvi 2460LMT.

For Reference Only

Just like everything else, GPS is for reference only. Only when and if multiple references are all pointing to one thing, then it can become trustworthy.

Put the blame where it belongs

I bet the same warnings were given in antiquity when paper maps became available, god only knows how many died sailing to the new world, or perished seeking fortune in the west long before GPS.

What got them in trouble was not the route they took but everything that came afterwards, mainly they were not prepared to go on a sparsely traveled road.

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Exactly

cameotabby wrote:

Just like everything else, GPS is for reference only. Only when and if multiple references are all pointing to one thing, then it can become trustworthy.

GPS is a great tool in assisting to get to a destination, but for up-to-date and 100% accurate information I look through my windshield grin

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

:P

Quote:

GPS is a great tool in assisting to get to a destination, but for up-to-date and 100% accurate information I look through my windshield grin

i thought that was required anyway.
mrgreen mrgreen

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This is merely the culling of the herd. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

.

thrak wrote:

It's simple if you set your preferences to avoid unpaved roads or even if you use "fastest route" instead of "shortest route". Shortest often takes people onto unpaved and impassable roads. It's a very poor setting to use.

Not in my case... I do have unpaved checked and I use fastest route. There is a SMALL dirt road (actually a farm road for a farmer to get to his fields, but it is a named road) near my mom's house. My Garmin always wants to send me down it, my brother came from OK last year and used his phone for a GPS, sent him down the dirt road, she's had contractors come to the house... well you get what I'm saying.

As stated above you have to use a little common sense, don't blindly follow what your GPSr says. It may not really know what is paved or not, it doesn't have any idea what part of town you should avoid it's just looking to get you from where you are to where you want to be.

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Brian Garmin nuvi 255W

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Juggernaut wrote:

This is merely the culling of the herd. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

Self-nominations for Darwin Awards. smile

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*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

Bingo!

mrgreen

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

I don't think I can win

kch50428 wrote:
Juggernaut wrote:

This is merely the culling of the herd. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

Self-nominations for Darwin Awards. smile

For some strange reason, I don't think I can win the award. I was driving in New Brunswick near the Bay of Fundy (I'd recommend the visit) and began to follow the directions on my GPS. At first the road was dirt/gravel which is fine, we have plenty of roads like that around home.

Part way up, we began to see small ruts in the road that started to grow. Once I saw some rather large rocks in the road, I turned around and went back the way I came and found another route.

Common sense just isn't too common anymore, so does that just make it "sense" now?

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

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My rule of thumb is, if it starts to looks like a bad idea, it probably is!

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Robert Frost once said:

Juggernaut wrote:

My rule of thumb is, if it starts to looks like a bad idea, it probably is!

Well, Robert Frost once took the road less traveled and it worked out ok...

I have to agree, I've only turned around twice when it didn't seem right. The one previously mentioned, and the second was on the way to Labrador City on HWY 389 heading north from Baie Comeau. Very scenic and remote, but not quite the road for my car. Some day I'll get to Labrador, but not any time soon sad

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

.

I think he was referring to more of a spiritual metaphor...

But yes, going 4x4'ing in a car is not the best plan.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

I was re-reading the article

Juggernaut wrote:

I think he was referring to more of a spiritual metaphor...

But yes, going 4x4'ing in a car is not the best plan.

Sorry, I should have been clearer in my post, that comment was mainly sarcastic in nature. In the article I read the following:

"When two roads diverge in Western lands, take the one more traveled, authorities said."

This topic reminds me of a GPS commercial, where the navigation said something like "Turn right in 50 feet" and the guy drove through a glass window. Can't remember what that was for now.

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

Garmin and Unpaved Roads

I'm curious to know, what does Garmin define as an Unpaved Road?

Looking at Navteq, I see the following categories:

FC1 Main Road
FC2 First Class Road
FC3 Second Class Road
FC4 Third Class Road
FC5 Fourth Class Road

Looking at the map of roads near my house, I see a few dirt (mud) roads that are FC5. Would Garmin consider anything FC3 and up to be paved? I'm guessing FC4 isn't that great either.

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT

US Travelers warned NOT to rely on GPS

US Travelers warned NOT to rely on common sense.

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vmfa531 wrote:

US Travelers warned NOT to rely on common sense.

No worries, that was gone LONG ago...

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

I can attest to that. I have

I can attest to that. I have had incidents somewhat similar while vacationing with friends on various motorcycle trips. One was a gravel road that ended up in a dead end after a couple of miles, another where the road turned to a dirt and very narrow road that took us up and down through some very high mountains and a third time where we did not take the gravel road the GPS was telling us to go.
The only positive side is, this happened in West Virginia and the views were breathtaking!!!

Even driving locally

GPS Definately a guide only, in my own area it sometimes tries to take me a longer way home going down a certain road when I know I can make one turn and get home quicker.

I Remember

I remember driving in Germany many years ago. a narrow paved road goes off to the right & says to the schloss (castle) that I was interested in going to see. Took it & about 1/4 mile down it I discovered it was for bicycles only (right - some were coming the other way!). Had to back up the entire way.

THAT was WITHOUT benefit of a GPS. Consider how serious a circumstance I could have gotten into with one!

Nothing works in ALL circumstances. Sober thought is recommended in the use of ANY device.

Fred

Common Sense is an Oxymoron

Juggernaut wrote:
vmfa531 wrote:

US Travelers warned NOT to rely on common sense.

No worries, that was gone LONG ago...

Common Sense is an Oxymoron

I should sell that as a bumper sticker... but then not enough people would understand it - kind of a self-fullfilling prophesy. smile

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*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

Why didn't we just check

Why didn't we just check 'avoid unpaved road' on the devise?

or, you know, drive with

or, you know, drive with your eyes on the road instead of on the device itself. i suppose we want all the work to be done for us!!

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tttincognito wrote:

Why didn't we just check 'avoid unpaved road' on the devise?

Because the devise is often wrong. Very wrong.

Here in Iowa, thanks to technology and the E911 phone system, every road has a street, avenue or road etc. name - and all dwellings have unique addresses, just like in cities. Many of those are gravel roads. It seems the map makers assume any address on a street, avenue, road, etc. is on a paved road when they're not.

Bottom line - if you're not sure where you're going - preview your route, and cross-reference it to a physical, paper map, or on-line with a satellite hybrid map and see what you might be getting into and make adjustments in the route with waypoints on major intersections if you want to force a more specific route.

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*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

A+

shrifty wrote:
cameotabby wrote:

Just like everything else, GPS is for reference only. Only when and if multiple references are all pointing to one thing, then it can become trustworthy.

GPS is a great tool in assisting to get to a destination, but for up-to-date and 100% accurate information I look through my windshield grin

Couldn't have said it better myself!!

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Garmin Nuvi 255W

Common Sense is Key and

Trust your intuition. GPS is not perfect.

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RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

Common Sense...or hindsight?

rkf wrote:

Trust your intuition. GPS is not perfect.

Some smart fellow once said:

"Common Sense is the method everyone agrees upon once the outcome is already known."

Dang

Morons

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

Ho Boy

TheProf wrote:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/us_travel_gps_danger

I am a OTR Driver an a SR mentor with my company. HAVE been a pro driver sence 1984 long befor GPS. I have not 1 but 2 GPS's in my truck a Rand Mc Nally 510 and a Garmin 465T and I stell make my students do the maps 1st then come pair them to the GPS's. I tell them, my wife friends and you. USE a GPS as a copilot not an auto pilot " NEVER AS A AUTO PILOT"
Jolleyr

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Southern CA Temp 76 and Sunny. Running around with my Nuvi 465T. Getting lost around the country and loving it.

reliance on GPS

I'm with you. I trust a GPS just as much as I trust a woman navigator. I'll always check the route to make sure there are no errors.
On the highway I'll most always trust the signs rather than the GPS. Except for those signs that say "Ignore your GPS", like those directing you to the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit.

jolleyr wrote:
TheProf wrote:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/us_travel_gps_danger

I am a OTR Driver an a SR mentor with my company. HAVE been a pro driver sence 1984 long befor GPS. I have not 1 but 2 GPS's in my truck a Rand Mc Nally 510 and a Garmin 465T and I stell make my students do the maps 1st then come pair them to the GPS's. I tell them, my wife friends and you. USE a GPS as a copilot not an auto pilot " NEVER AS A AUTO PILOT"
Jolleyr

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nuvi 855. Life is not fair. I don't care who told you it is.

shortest route

Using shortest route in any unfamiliar state, especially the western less populated states is just looking for trouble.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Always be prepared

Don B wrote:

Using shortest route in any unfamiliar state, especially the western less populated states is just looking for trouble.

Using a GPSr in unfamiliar States, Cities or any situation without a map or atlas is just looking for trouble, PERIOD.

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

trust me

Go ahead comb your hair,read your paper,drink your coffee your GPS will take care of you. LOL
Good luck in your travels Cliff

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I may have my user name and password confused or switched! Can I get confimation of my user name????

My coworkers joke I rely on

My coworkers joke I rely on my GPS too much. It's true I've been known to cancel my field work if it's thunderstorming or the weather is bad. I do rely on common sense and never travel into area I've not previlously researched online for geocaching.

...

Use common sense.

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Michael (Nuvi 2639LMT)

Honestly, I'd never turn

Honestly, I'd never turn onto a dirt road. As mentioned use the fastest feature and only travel well known roads. Simple as that.

GPS

So true. GPS devices are tools/instruments, to be used with common sense. As for shortest distance, I believe I read in Garmin faq's that the reason why my eta may vary (substantially) from actual arrival could be because the device estimates based on "as the crow flies". Does not help much if you're unable to drive directly thru a concrete wall to get to your destination.

Maps

BobDee wrote:
Don B wrote:

Using shortest route in any unfamiliar state, especially the western less populated states is just looking for trouble.

Using a GPSr in unfamiliar States, Cities or any situation without a map or atlas is just looking for trouble, PERIOD.

I haven't carried paper maps since 2001, that's why I bought a GPS. But I do create and upload routes before I leave home. I never use shortest route and I also make sure I take my common sense along

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Go ahead and use a GPS as a auto pilot please

Shelbrain wrote:

My coworkers joke I rely on my GPS too much. It's true I've been known to cancel my field work if it's thunderstorming or the weather is bad. I do rely on common sense and never travel into area I've not previlously researched online for geocaching.

Go ahead and use a GPS as a auto pilot. But remember this. "A auto pilot will put you in the middle of a GRAVE YARD. A Copilot will send you by it". jolleyr

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Southern CA Temp 76 and Sunny. Running around with my Nuvi 465T. Getting lost around the country and loving it.

Auto Pilot

I have to admit using the GPS like an autopilot, however, that is usually only in inhabited areas. Looking out the window has always been my first priority, and if anything feels even remotely odd, use your common sense.

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Dudlee

Common Sense..?..!

The article stated in part..

Quote:

"Law enforcement and search and rescue officials said that too many travelers are letting technology lull them into a false sense of security. There are times when you need to put the GPS down and look out the window. wink You've got people driving into the middle of a field because a machine showed a route that was shorter and quicker. redface Authorities said such incidents show there is no substitute for common sense." grin

Well who'da thunk the above was the smart thing to do? rolleyes

Nuvi1300WTGPS

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I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

More people may choose "Shortest Route"

More people may feel inclined to select "Shortest Route" because of the soaring price of gas.

No question, it can be a risky choice to make if you haven't checked out the GPS' route selection against a paper or PC map.

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JMoo On

Simon Sez

Drive off a cliff. sad

As stated above, if it looks like a bad idea, it probably is.

Absolute Reliance on Tachnology is ALWAYS a Mistake

We have travelled a fair bit in remote areas of the western US. I like to check out unusual sites and interesting geology, and there are a lot of appealing road signs advertising Scenic Byway.

I do a lot of preplanning when we go on our trips and have a very good idea of where we are going. I rely on the GPS to tell me where the next rest area is, how far it is to the nearest Mickey D's, and how long it will take to get to our destination. But I STILL carry maps, tend to stick to paved roads, and rarely take short cuts.

The story of the Chretiens is an unfortunate example of what can happen when people rely on technology without a backup plan.

use gravel roads

agree with the comments about using common sense, but in some rural areas, gravel roads are common, and can even be decent roads to use. But, like anything, a little planning ahead is worth and always pay attention to the real signs and road conditions - after all, the GPS or a paper map is just a tool, they are not oracles.

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___________________ Garmin 2455, 855, Oregon 550t

mmmm

rigel wrote:

agree with the comments about using common sense, but in some rural areas, gravel roads are common, and can even be decent roads to use. But, like anything, a little planning ahead is worth and always pay attention to the real signs and road conditions - after all, the GPS or a paper map is just a tool, they are not oracles.

rigel what u said is true unless u r a OTR driver then the Rand McNally Motor Carrier Road Atlas is the oracle. Happy hunting be safe get lost and have fun. jolleyr

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Southern CA Temp 76 and Sunny. Running around with my Nuvi 465T. Getting lost around the country and loving it.

Just finished 2000+ miles

Just finished 2000+ miles from Orlando into Manitoba using the GPS and yes it likes to take me where I should not go. It is always best to preplan and have an idea of the highway numbers and exits you are looking for along the way. I did make a few mistakes that made delays, but all in all the GPS is still invaluable along with common sense.

Much ado about nothing

From the article:

"You've got people driving into the middle of a field because a machine showed a route that was shorter and quicker -- which it ultimately is not," said Rob DeBree, undersheriff in Albany County in southeastern Wyoming."

----------------------

It is more likely that GPS units keep more people out of harms way than the very small few who get in trouble with them.

An out-of-date Rand-McNally road atlas has much more of a chance getting a person, looking for a shortcut, lost.

(I've never hear of anyone complain that a paperback road atlas "lulled" them into getting lost.)

In the end - GPS units do more GOOD than harm.

It's not as if these GPS's are like red-light cameras - out there causing more accidents than they prevent.

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