Garmin Future

 

Garmin earnings were just released, and the stock is down 6%.

Basically, the worst performance is US personal nagivation devices. Migration seems to be toward cellphone navigation, which Garmin tried unsucessfully to enter, and failed.

I don't get it. Can someone explain why you prefer to pay $10 a month for cellphone navigation, instead of a standalone GPS?

I admit I've never used a phone to navigate.

Roy Adams

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A standalone GPS is nice,

A standalone GPS is nice, because you don't rely on cellular coverage, and you can enter POIs like the redlight camera files, no doubt.

However, the new Android phones with free Google Maps navigation are just as good as stand-alone GPS units, when you're within cellular coverage. There is no additional $10 charge, not on Sprint. You also have the Sprint TeleNav navigation for free as well on an Android device.

Also the maps are always updated to the latest version, and the nearby POIs are updated all the time as well, since the data lives on the cloud. There are also apps available like Co-Pilot that can download US maps locally on the phone so you still have maps and navigation even outside of cellular coverage. The app costs $5 or $6 for US maps, a one time charge versus the very expensive cost from Garmin or TomTom.

So it comes down to convenience. The Android phones combine a decent camera, web browser, gaming device, GPS, media player, and cellphone in one device. You only have to carry a single device, and use the GPS for the few times when you need it.

If I was going on long road trips, I would have the standalone GPS with me. But for in-town errands, the Android GPS capabilities are more than sufficient.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Screen Size

How about screen size and where to position the gps. I would think the stand alone would be ahead/better.

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Nuvi 255W

why

fubdap wrote:

How about screen size and where to position the gps. I would think the stand alone would be ahead/better.

Why?

I have a 4.3" Android phone (Evo) and it works better than any widescreen GPS I've used, and better than the 3.5" GPS I usually carry due to limited space.

And I have a car dock for the Evo, works just fine.

Even on phones with smaller screen sizes, it's far more convenient to use that phone as a GPS, than to carry a separate GPS device just for a nicer screen size. It's all about convenience.

Not to mention an extra GPS costs money, and the map updates cost an exorbitant amount of money relative to the Android maps / GPS. People get to save both money and space by using a single compact device.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Stand alone for me

I prefer the stand alone unit, but I can see how people who don't use it much may go for a phone application that costs little and updates for free.

I prefer to have dedicated devices and I carry all of them. I have a phone with mp3 player capabilities and gps, among other things (and it is not a "smartphone") and never use them. I do have the gpsr and the mp3 player for that. The trend with young people is to have everything in that little box they still call a phone (more like a real computer nowadays)

My main reason NOT to use an "all in one" device is the battery life. I want my phone to have FULL battery power in an emergency, which is not possible if I'm going to be wasting it by playing music, checking gps, etc. If I lose the battery in the mp3 player, music is not necessary...if I lose the gps, I can ask for directions. If I lose the phone and I have an accident in the middle of nowhere (drive by there every other day grin ), I'd be counting on someone driving by...

Hopefully Garmin and others will continue with enough revenue to stay in business. I'd hate it if stand alone devices disappear in favor of a pocket computer that wants to do everything in a tiny screen (cellphone)

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Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

Agree, I still want a

Agree, I still want a standalone device and I still have a 3.5" GPS in my travel backpack when I travel out of town.

Standalone GPS have their place, but they are becoming less mainstream. Soon they will be a niche.

With regards to battery life, for my Evo, I bought 2 spare batteries, and a spare battery charger for $10 off of eBay. Battery life is a non-issue. Just swap in a new battery and I'm good to go.

I can't swap batteries unfortunately in any of the stand-alone GPS units. They're all built in, so they must be constantly charged or they die, especially the crappy TomTom GPS units that don't retain the battery charge even when off.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

$10 More a month??

I pay less than $45 (tax included) a month for 500 anytime minutes, free mobile to mobile, unlimited data/picture mail and 500 text messages. I may be wrong but does one need to have the more expensive data plan when using one of the phones that run the apps? I think Sprint's cost is over $100 for service on one of the Smart phones. Even thou I have unlimited data I prefer using my laptop for internet, my personalized gps while driving and my cel for talking and occassional texting.

details

gaferris wrote:

I pay less than $45 (tax included) a month for 500 anytime minutes, free mobile to mobile, unlimited data/picture mail and 500 text messages. I may be wrong but does one need to have the more expensive data plan when using one of the phones that run the apps? I think Sprint's cost is over $100 for service on one of the Smart phones. Even thou I have unlimited data I prefer using my laptop for internet, my personalized gps while driving and my cel for talking and occassional texting.

Yes you are wrong.

I have the Sprint Everything Data plan which is $69.99 per month, and includes everything. I pay $10 more for a 4G experience with the Evo, that brings it to $79.99. But you can absolutely have everything (including GPS) with the $69.99 plan.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

I use a Sprint Family Plan

gaferris wrote:

I pay less than $45 (tax included) a month for 500 anytime minutes, free mobile to mobile, unlimited data/picture mail and 500 text messages. I may be wrong but does one need to have the more expensive data plan when using one of the phones that run the apps? I think Sprint's cost is over $100 for service on one of the Smart phones. Even thou I have unlimited data I prefer using my laptop for internet, my personalized gps while driving and my cel for talking and occassional texting.

I have 1500 minutes plus unlimited data and messaging for two phones and free calls to/from all cell phones in the USA at $124/monthly total including taxes with a corp discount.
I definitely prefer the phone with Google maps to my Nuvi 350. I NEVER use the screen, I only use the voice prompts. I do not use Sprint navigation that is also free on my plan and it has live traffic. After the Nuvi dies I doubt I will get another stand alone unit. The only reason I might get another stand alone would be if the phones have not yet become able to have a red light and or speed camera files installed. I expect my Nuvi to keep going strong for quite awhile so I don't think I will be faced with the problem soon.

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

.

roywadams wrote:

I don't get it. Can someone explain why you prefer to pay $10 a month for cellphone navigation, instead of a standalone GPS?

All of the smartphone naysayers always ask this question and I don't understand why! No one buys a smartphone just for the gps feature. They buy a smartphone to have 24/7 access to internet, email, apps, etc. The gps feature is just icing on the cake.

Roughly 500,000 iphone & android phones are being sold EVERY DAY. Think about that.

another possibility

Remember when you couldn't get a CD player on a car unless you put an aftermarket changer? Now you can hardly get a car without one. Many will even play mp3 files.

Remember when an air conditioner was an extra-cost option?

How long will it be before most cars have built-in GPS navigator?

Personally, I prefer a smaller phone, so a small screen will be a dealbreaker for me. But how long will it be before a small smartphone can project a large holographic map?

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nüvi 750 & 760

I find people get things wrong

about smart phones and their GPS applications. I use an iPhone so I'm mainly talking about what it does.

1. If you are using say TomTom or Navigon, you don't need a cell phone connection to cell towers to navigate. When you do have a cell signal, the GPS actually works better than a stand alone GPS especially when under a lot of tree cover or when navigating in urban canyons.

2. There is no monthly charge to use the the GPS functions.

3. The screen is just slightly smaller than my Garmin iQue but is much easier to see especially in sunshine.

4. The battery will run down quickly no doubt, but why wouldn't you use a car mount that has power to it like you do with a stand alone GPS?

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If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Remeber when

Remeber when Cable and Satelite TV was to be comercial free. You paid extra to have that feature. Now all they carry in infomercials. Landline phone are falling fast just as antenna TV stations. Watch out, think twice about what you wish for. THe goverment will be controlling everything, as if they don't now!

Stand Alone

Asa OTR driverI need a stan a lone unit like the 465T. A smart phone like my BlackBerry will not cut it. Safety u know

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Southern CA Temp 76 and Sunny. Running around with my Nuvi 465T. Getting lost around the country and loving it.

cellphone nav

VZW wants $30/month for their data plan. We have no smart phones... just feature phones (envTouch and env3). While VZWNav is available, you have to have the data plan to use it.

I have no intention to pay $30/month/phone for this service since we have no use for data otherwise.

Also, you'll need a BT connection to be able to talk and NAV at the same time with your smartphone, right?

So the cellphone nav option is not for everyone.

I wonder what part of their total business the PND is for Garmin?

--
nuvi 1690 with ecoRoute HD, SP2610 (retired), Edge 305, Forerunner 405

Some just want

the lastest and greatest even if they'll never use it.

--
Mike

Phone Navigation

I have a Droid (original one) with the free Google navigation. I have been totally dissatisfied with my Garmin 765T since it has no detail in the maps. (There is no difference between normal and high settings.)

A few months ago I was approaching St Louis over a weekend and ALL of the interstates crossing the Mississippi River were closed. Yes, all of them except I-270 to the north and I-255 to the south. I tried to look at the Garmin to see which was the better detour. Alas, by the time I zoomed out past 800 feet and zoomed and zoomed and zoomed till I got to 3 or 5 mile scale, there were no longer any road markings so I had no idea what road was the interstate. So the Garmin proved totally useless. You may have heard me swearing at it!!

I then switched on my phone (I have the windshield mount for it) and was able to easily navigate around St Louis, as I could see all of the roads and make an informed decision.

HOWEVER, I decided to keep the phone navigation on and use it in parallel with the Garmin. I noticed that the charge light had gone out on the phone. The battery was nearly dead even though it was plugged in. I grabbed the phone and it was so hot I nearly dropped it. I held it in front of the air conditioner vent and as it cooled down, the charge light came back on. I placed it back in the windshield mount, protected it from any possible sun by putting some paper behind it, and it overheated again. So... unless my unit is defective, while the GPS information is far superior to any recent Garmin (my old 680 had great detail), the phone (at least the Droid) cannot be used for GPS continuously as one would use the Garmin since it overheats badly.

While I am venting, I have been very disappointed with the 765, since on cross country trips, I have never seen a city labeled on the map. As I approach cities like St Louis, Dallas, Oklahoma City, etc, all I see are (usually) unlabeled highway intersections. Since I don't have my 680 any more (sigh) I now need to carry paper maps so that I can tell where I am. And Garmin thinks that is perfectly normal, since the GPS units are "...not to be considered maps, only guidance and turn-by-turn devices..." But should you need to take a detour, you are totally dependent on the Garmin for directions, since you cannot see enough roads (or their identities) to be able to take a different route. And in this instance (as in most), the Garmin continuously wanted to take me back to the closed roads.

I am reluctant to even think of getting a new Garmin, since I have no idea if they have "improved" the units to be more like the old ones. Or that they will not take away features in a subsequent update. On my 680, after an update the North arrow was eliminated - the only way to tell which way you were traveling (other than carrying a paper map) was to put it in North Up mode.

Have Garmin fixed any of these issues in the new generation of units???

-hjrw

Well...

Where I use GPS, there is no cell phone coverage.

So the cell phone thingy, just ain't gonna work for me.

The only cell phone coverage is around the highways, and that ain't where I go.

--
If you ain't got pictures, I wasn't there.

You may have a defective

You may have a defective Droid.

I used my Samsung Epic in Las Vegas, in the hot sun, with GPS on for over an hour at a time, with zero overheating issues.

Nor has my Evo ever overheated in the hot Phoenix summer while using GPS.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

what phone?

alpine1 wrote:

Where I use GPS, there is no cell phone coverage.

So the cell phone thingy, just ain't gonna work for me.

The only cell phone coverage is around the highways, and that ain't where I go.

What cellphone?

On Android there is CoPilot Live, which costs $5 (one time cost), and gives you navigation without cellular coverage.

On iPhone there are TomTom / Navigon etc apps that can do the same thing.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Overheating

I think that the Droid will work for about an hour or so. It is trying to use it on a major trip where it just overheats and kills the battery.

I don't know if heat does it... I'm in Phoenix as well. But the phone is too hot to touch when GPS is used for extended periods and Android apparently turns off the charging circuit so the battery eventually goes dead.

-hjrw

yea

hjrw wrote:

I think that the Droid will work for about an hour or so. It is trying to use it on a major trip where it just overheats and kills the battery.

I don't know if heat does it... I'm in Phoenix as well. But the phone is too hot to touch when GPS is used for extended periods and Android apparently turns off the charging circuit so the battery eventually goes dead.

-hjrw

Yea sounds like a defect. My Evo / Epic never heat up much while using GPS.

If the phone heats up too much, then the CPU protection will kick in and either shut off the phone or prevent charging and other symptoms.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Against the Law

Using a handheld cell phone in the car is against the law in many Canadian provinces and many US States. Why take the chance.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

don't think so

davidkbrown wrote:

Using a handheld cell phone in the car is against the law in many Canadian provinces and many US States. Why take the chance.

I'm not sure about Canada, but not against the law if it's being used like the standalone GPS, here in the states.

This sounds like FUD.

And Garmin is out of the smartphone game: http://phandroid.com/2010/11/04/garmin-formally-bows-out-of-...

Can't beat the wave of smartphones with the free and cheap GPS services.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Smartphone vs. GPS

I'm sensing a generation gap here.

I'm old fashioned. I typically carry a netbook, a camera, a GPS and a cellphone.

The guys with smartphones seem to get by with just it. That seems to be the trend.

I don't think there is a right or wrong here, just differences in style.

Thanks for sharing your views, I appreciate all input. I'm trying to decide if it's time to dump the Garmin stock.

Roy

I'm not 100% sure if it's a

I'm not 100% sure if it's a generational gap.

I've got a friend my age, who still uses flip phones.

He does cross country trips by himself, to go national parks, etc.

I've tried to extol the virtues of a GPS to him for years now, and yet he keeps saying "my paper maps are just fine."

Some people just don't truly understand the benefits of gadgets & new devices, for whatever reason.

He was the last person I knew who got a cellphone. Once he got a cellphone, now he swears he can't live without it.

I think it has to do more with personality than age.

And yes, I would dump the Garmin stock right now if I were you. I don't see how they can continue with the current business model.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

plain gps works for me

I don't own a cellphone and am just happy without one.

iPhone Fad

I think the iPhone and smartphones for GPSing will soon die. My son has drank the iPhone kool-aid. We took a trip recently in a rental car. He said no need for a GPS, he had it on his phone. Well, the battery died just as we got to OKC, where we really needed it. The final straw for me was when my daughter took off across the rural part of the state and ran into a problem along the way. NO CELL COVERAGE. NO IDEA where she was. She just kept driving until she got into roam coverage and called me. Still no idea WHERE she was. The next day I bought 3 real deal GPS's (Nuvi's) for my wife and daughters. Now they ALWAYS know where they are. My son MAY admit our dedicated GPS's are better in a couple years.

I think the trend towards in dash and smart phones will die out. Portable, stand-alone units will be with us for a long time to come. Remember, Garmin came up with the concept, invented it, created the market. They had their doubters from the beginning. The doubters are broke, Garmin thrives. Don't write them off yet.

LOL

foghorn.legghorn wrote:

I think the iPhone and smartphones for GPSing will soon die. ...

Hahahahaahaaaa I can't stop laughing.

Perhaps you missed the info above about apps that now store maps data locally on the phones. So no need for cellular service just like a standalone GPS.

And the iPhone makes for an inferior navigation out of the box compared to the Android phones.

Google Maps on Android provides detailed turn by turn directions compared to plain old maps on the iPhones.

However with the offline navigation provided by CoPilot, Navigon, TomTom, etc., the phones are just as good at navigating while out of cellular coverage as standalone units.

You take a single failure of an inappropriate use of a smartphone for GPS to mean the failure of the entire platform as a whole.

This must be why Garmin's standalone navigation devices are selling like hotcakes now, right? oh wait...

I have never doubted Garmin before, as I have 3 Garmin GPS units alone. But this is the first time as a serious GPS user that I don't believe their business model will stand.

Standalone GPS units are now a niche. I have several standalone GPS units, but I will not be buying any more standalone GPS units. I see no reason to. I barely even use the standalone GPS units as it is, even when I have one in every car and in my backpack. My Android phone does all of the duty.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Bought my Garmin to Work with My phone

I don't understand the atractions of a smart phone. although they do make the phone companies a lot of money. I need a computer that I can write a text document or work a spread sheet. Smart phones are useless for these types of things,.. I need a GPS system most of all when I'm out in the boonies where there is no cell service.
My garmin makes for a nice bluetooth speaker phone when I need it most.. Most smart phones aren't as good at reception in marginal areas as cheapo flip phones. As speaker phones they are incomprehensible on both ends. The garmin makes speaker phone usage tolorable.

--
Observations of a Yankee in Galveston, TX libertysblog.com

Personally I think stand alone GPS will not last forever...

Most consumers want to carry less so I think the combo will go on eventhough combo is bad but people still want them.

.

Its really sad how these Garmin fanboys keep repeating the same arguments even though we've told them numerous times they're not even valid arguments.

For the last time, current smartphone gps apps (TomTom, CoPilot) STORE THE MAPS ON THE PHONE SO YOU CAN STILL CONTINUE TO NAVIGATE EVEN IF YOU LOSE CELL COVERAGE.

For my family, stand alone GPS still makes sense.

In order to use GPS function on a phone, you must subscribe to a data plan. On verizon it is $30 per month per line. That adds up to a good chunk of change for a family of four. An inexpensive stand alone can be less than $100. Heck, some of the lesser known brands can be less than $50.

If we eventually get data plans, then it will probably make sense to use phone GPS, but for now, stand alone units are a better way to go for us.

Android?

nuvic320 wrote:
foghorn.legghorn wrote:

I think the iPhone and smartphones for GPSing will soon die. ...

Hahahahaahaaaa I can't stop laughing.

Perhaps you missed the info above about apps that now store maps data locally on the phones. So no need for cellular service just like a standalone GPS.

And the iPhone makes for an inferior navigation out of the box compared to the Android phones.

Google Maps on Android provides detailed turn by turn directions compared to plain old maps on the iPhones.

However with the offline navigation provided by CoPilot, Navigon, TomTom, etc., the phones are just as good at navigating while out of cellular coverage as standalone units.

You take a single failure of an inappropriate use of a smartphone for GPS to mean the failure of the entire platform as a whole.

This must be why Garmin's standalone navigation devices are selling like hotcakes now, right? oh wait...

I have never doubted Garmin before, as I have 3 Garmin GPS units alone. But this is the first time as a serious GPS user that I don't believe their business model will stand.

Standalone GPS units are now a niche. I have several standalone GPS units, but I will not be buying any more standalone GPS units. I see no reason to. I barely even use the standalone GPS units as it is, even when I have one in every car and in my backpack. My Android phone does all of the duty.

I agree with most of your post. However, having seen and played with the Android (my 14 year old nephew has one) I would say this is a powerful pocket computer pretending to be a phone. Let's see: 1GHz, 32bit processor (just like a Pentium 3 from a few years back), gigabytes of memory, high res. display, etc. I'd say it is overkill for a phone. This is the PDA evolved, picture and HD video camera, GPSr, MP3 player, web browser, Facebook, etc. The kid is happy. I won't touch it. But I'm 47 and the trend is with younger people. I may have to give up and get one should "stand-alone" device companies fail.

What's next? A dual core, 64bit cell phone? Gesture recognition? retinal scan security? Holographic projector? Bring on the Star Trek tricorder razz

--
Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

.

foghorn.legghorn wrote:

We took a trip recently in a rental car. He said no need for a GPS, he had it on his phone. Well, the battery died just as we got to OKC, where we really needed it.

Why wasn't he using a car charger for the iPhone?

foghorn.legghorn wrote:

I think the iPhone and smartphones for GPSing will soon die.

Let me guess, you also think the internet is just a fad. wink

Exactly

GadgetGuy2008 wrote:

Its really sad how these Garmin fanboys keep repeating the same arguments even though we've told them numerous times they're not even valid arguments.

For the last time, current smartphone gps apps (TomTom, CoPilot) STORE THE MAPS ON THE PHONE SO YOU CAN STILL CONTINUE TO NAVIGATE EVEN IF YOU LOSE CELL COVERAGE.

The phones have a built in GPS chip, and if I remember correctly all phones on sale in the US must have one by law (911 services locator, or something like that), so it all comes down to that being a program to download for free or a paid service (to activate). The gps chip doesn't need a cell phone signal and works just like the ones in stand-alone gps units.

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Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

.

Thanos_of_MW wrote:

I agree with most of your post. However, having seen and played with the Android (my 14 year old nephew has one) I would say this is a powerful pocket computer pretending to be a phone. Let's see: 1GHz, 32bit processor (just like a Pentium 3 from a few years back), gigabytes of memory, high res. display, etc. I'd say it is overkill for a phone.

Wow. Just wow. Now folks are knocking smartphones simply because they are so powerful. Amazing.

(Shakes head and walks off into the sunset.)

Wow

GadgetGuy2008 wrote:
Thanos_of_MW wrote:

I agree with most of your post. However, having seen and played with the Android (my 14 year old nephew has one) I would say this is a powerful pocket computer pretending to be a phone. Let's see: 1GHz, 32bit processor (just like a Pentium 3 from a few years back), gigabytes of memory, high res. display, etc. I'd say it is overkill for a phone.

Wow. Just wow. Now folks are knocking smartphones simply because they are so powerful. Amazing.

(Shakes head and walks off into the sunset.)

Misinterpreting much? Not knocking it down, just pointing out facts in (I thought) a funny way. It is a powerful computer with a cell phone attached to it. I could as well market it as a HD camera with GPS geo-tagging and a cellphone peripheral razz Or a pocket PC with HD camera, built in cell-modem, open source OS, etc. You get the point? It is just more desirable to say it is a cell phone with cool peripherals.
Nothing against your post, in fact you can say with all that in favor, stand alone devices could die, soon. I prefer stand-alone, but I'm not opposed to the all-in-one device. If you like it (and most people do) more power to you wink I also said I'd get one if the stand-alone companies die.

Addition: I guess my point is: at what point does it stop being a phone? That's why I referenced dual core chips razz The android is an "all-in-one" device. Since it is open source, what stops me from changing its behavior to make it a PC first and have the phone as a secondary peripheral, let's say giving priority to the camera? Again, not dissing it. You could say the same happens to all electronic makers nowadays: MP3 players with ebook capability and viceversa, Garmin with gpsrs with mp3 players, wifi, bluetooth. Everyone wants to be a jack of all trades.

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Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

more info

Thanos_of_MW wrote:

I agree with most of your post. However, having seen and played with the Android (my 14 year old nephew has one) I would say this is a powerful pocket computer pretending to be a phone. Let's see: 1GHz, 32bit processor (just like a Pentium 3 from a few years back), gigabytes of memory, high res. display, etc. I'd say it is overkill for a phone. This is the PDA evolved, picture and HD video camera, GPSr, MP3 player, web browser, Facebook, etc. The kid is happy. I won't touch it. But I'm 47 and the trend is with younger people. I may have to give up and get one should "stand-alone" device companies fail.

What's next? A dual core, 64bit cell phone? Gesture recognition? retinal scan security? Holographic projector? Bring on the Star Trek tricorder razz

You, like a few others, don't understand the use cases for a true smart phone.

I hardly do any gaming on my phones, or a lot of Facebook or that stuff. Let me tell you why smartphones are still life changing:

1) Having the wealth of the internet's information at your fingertips, every where you go, is indescribable.

a) While shopping, you come across something that you are interested in, but not sure if it's a good price. With a smartphone, you can scan the SKU and instantly get prices for that product or service locally and nationally. You don't have to waste time and go home to do research. You get the info you need to make the decison.

b) Looking for something. You're on your way to Home Depot, but on the way, you're not sure if the Home Depot close to you is still open, or if you need to go to the one further away. A quick google of the two home depot's shows their store hours, or a link to their phone #s so you can quickly verify hours, before you waste time going to a store that may be closed. Time & money saved.

c) looking for a store or restaurant or a movie show time is a snap. Instead of calling a bunch of places, or looking at an outdated POI on a GPS that may or may not be with you, you use real time search to get the info, right there and then.

2. Being able to do stuff anywhere instead of waiting to get home to do it is amazing.

a) You're traveling, and you need to log online quickly to do a banking transfer to pay a bill. If you wait to go home it will be too late and you'll pay penalty. You can do it online on the phone, or use wireless internet tethering to pay the bill anywhere you are. Time and money saved.

b) You are looking at a car to buy, but need a friend's opinion. With a snap of a shutter you instant share the picture of the car with your friend, along with a short video. Your friend can quickly give you the right advise while you're still at the seller's location on keep looking or make a deal. Time and money saved.

3. Staying in touch and on top of things.

a) being able to email info and receive important info anywhere you are, email from friends, family, work, etc. killer app right there.

b) send status updates anywhere you go. I only use Facebook for travel. When I was out of town last week, I used Facebook and posted pictures of where I was at, and my family / friends were kept up to date on what I was up to, where I was going, etc. If I got into trouble, they would know where to look for me.

c) I was at a conference, and the agenda was in PDF. I could easily view the PDF on my phone and see what was happening, instead of carrying my laptop with me to view the info, or a bunch of papers. My calendar also kept me updated on what key things I needed to attend to.

4. All the other stuff, like:

a) camera - useful for taking pix of stuff I want to remember and share, like business cards, people.

b) video camera - useful for recording audio, or video of places / people I want to remember.

c) GPS - came in handy multiple times because it was so convenient. I had my standalone GPS, but I didn't even pull it out a single time. Just didn't need it.

d) entertainment - Pandora, online radio stations, podcasts, videos, youtube, movies. All available anywhere I go.

New use cases are being developed for the smart phones all the time. I also use Keepass and Keepass Droid to securely store my internet passwords and other critical information on my phone, so I always have my super strong secured private information anywhere I go.

Smart phones are being developed as payment platforms. This will be a killer app because it goes one step above credit cards and becomes your ATM / credit card / Quicken finance tracker all in one.

Never has the opportunities and possibilities been so endless, with each innovation improving the richness and quality of our lives.

The smartphone is not a gimmick. It is a killer device with killer features for people of any status or any work or pleasure.

Those who profess not to get it, may be enlightened in the future. Or maybe not.

I know people who still don't use cellphones, and some who still have never logged onto the internet.

They're perfectly happy, and they profess they have no need for these things.

Are they wrong? Of course not! However, the opportunity cost of NOT having the information or capabilities to get that information is real. Most people just don't realize it, and will NEVER realize it.

It's a choice we all make. Just understand at least a little bit, that there are real opportunity costs that you're not taking advantage of, by avoiding smartphones or killer devices like this.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Bottom line, is: the

Bottom line, is: the internet is THE KILLER APP.

Having the internet at the tip of your fingers where ever you go, is a KILLER APP's Killer App. You have an inherent advantage over everyone else who does not have access to the internet, at that point in time.

Just like having a GPS is a huge advantage over paper maps, so is having a smart phone that gives real time info a huge advantage over a stand alone GPS.

There is no question about this. It's your choice to NOT have this capability, and you'll be fine, mostly. But the trend is the masses are realizing the power and potential of smartphones, and standalone GPSes are going to be a niche.

Garmin needs to find a new business model, or business is going to be very small for them.

PS - might I add, that for those of my friends and family who now own smartphones, and have seen the light, you can't pry away the smartphones away from!! It is THAT important and useful for them!

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Agree with this

nuvic320 wrote:
Thanos_of_MW wrote:

Those who profess not to get it, may be enlightened in the future. Or maybe not.

I know people who still don't use cellphones, and some who still have never logged onto the internet.

They're perfectly happy, and they profess they have no need for these things.

Are they wrong? Of course not! However, the opportunity cost of NOT having the information or capabilities to get that information is real. Most people just don't realize it, and will NEVER realize it.

It's a choice we all make. Just understand at least a little bit, that there are real opportunity costs that you're not taking advantage of, by avoiding smartphones or killer devices like this.

I'm glad you mentioned that in the end, it is a choice based on your life style. I can counter-point every single one of the points you made, based on my lifestyle, and I'm sure others could do the same based on theirs. Does that invalidate your reply? NO, not at all.

In my case, I schedule payments long before a trip (with most of my bills being recurrent autopay, so I don't have to bother with them--ever) and do my research at home before I go shopping, and that includes the time schedule of the stores I visit, as an example. You like doing that on the phone, on the go? Nothing wrong with it. Just different ways to do things.

I can see all the wealth of features in the current smart"phones". Not something I NEED. If later on, as I said, companies disappear and that's the only choice, I'll get one. I have a phone with a built-in camera, internet, email, gps, etc. but not considered a smartphone. Do I ever use any of the peripherals? the camera, sometimes. Do I ever mail those pictures? never from the phone. I don't pay extra for the data service, just voice. Do I ever need to access the web from the phone? No. I carry a laptop and I can use wifi if I have to (never had to). I won't over-extend myself with the reply, as you can see where I'm going with this. I didn't diss the Android, just pointing out the fact is more computer than "phone".

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Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

I carried a laptop last week

I carried a laptop last week with me. But wifi costs $13 at the hotel, and was very weak.

I did wireless tethering on my phone for free.

My Android phone has a real time "traffic" layer, so I get traffic monitoring for free.

I get coupons and offers to restaurants and businesses where I travel, on my phone, so I'm saving money there.

My point is, the threshold of investing a little bit more for a "data plan" and a smart phone, is starting to pay off big time, if you're savvy.

Your phone is a "feature phone" or "multi-media" phone. I don't want to insult you, but that is NOT EVEN CLOSE to being a real smartphone.

I have used Blackberries / Palm Treos / Centro's etc in the past, and they pale in comparison to the modern smart phones - Android / iPhone / Web OS / WP7.

Just because you happen to have a GPS, a camera, some super limited internet on a feature phone, does not mean you have come close to tasting the power of a real smart phone.

You're right though, smart phones are like computers, that happen to have a phone embedded in it. And that is truly invaluable.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Other post

nuvic320 wrote:

I carried a laptop last week with me. But wifi costs $13 at the hotel, and was very weak.

I did wireless tethering on my phone for free.

My Android phone has a real time "traffic" layer, so I get traffic monitoring for free.

I get coupons and offers to restaurants and businesses where I travel, on my phone, so I'm saving money there.

My point is, the threshold of investing a little bit more for a "data plan" and a smart phone, is starting to pay off big time, if you're savvy.

Your phone is a "feature phone" or "multi-media" phone. I don't want to insult you, but that is NOT EVEN CLOSE to being a real smartphone.

I have used Blackberries / Palm Treos / Centro's etc in the past, and they pale in comparison to the modern smart phones - Android / iPhone / Web OS / WP7.

Just because you happen to have a GPS, a camera, some super limited internet on a feature phone, does not mean you have come close to tasting the power of a real smart phone.

You're right though, smart phones are like computers, that happen to have a phone embedded in it. And that is truly invaluable.

If you read my other posts, you'd see I had used an android (my nephew's) and while it is cool, it is something I don't need. Perhaps when phone companies stop charging for data I'll consider it. I know what a "feature phone" is and it doesn't compare to the android. The point is I'm not using the features.

You are assuming that I can't see the advantages of that technology being with me at all times. From what you say I'll assume that you spend a lot of time on the go; I don't. There is absolutely nothing I do that can't wait until I get there or back home. The cellphone is there just in case of an emergency: mine or from a relative or friend that needs to contact me in those few times when I'm moving from one place to another.

The cellphone is something I got AFTER I was attacked in NYC by one of its many crazy bums on the street (no cops around, as usual). I used to be one of those who didn't care for a cell-phone. Now I keep it just for the family/friends convenience, or emergency for me. I don't need the internet with me 24/7

I'm glad you see smartphones as computers. My comparison of the Android to a Pentium3 just shows that something you used to have on your desktop (capable also of internet) now you can carry in your pocket, with all the wealth of features untethered. Is it invaluable to the majority? YES, that's why Garmin and others are in trouble. Not too many users like me to keep a business going wink

--
Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

Future Devices

I currently have a 765T that I purchased in March and even then, I suspected it would probably be my last standalone GPS (at for Garmin). Two reasons:

1) The newer devices are removing the features I have gotten used to with the "older" devices. The newest devices do not have either an FM transmitter OR audio out jack to allow you to interface the audio to a more robust system. Therefore, you are at the mercy of the tinny inside speaker. I also like the MP3 player and that is gone as well. Yes, I have an iPod Touch 3G but I still like the MP3 feature. 3-D views are going away and, though I have not really used them, it is another feature removed. I amazed that the built-in audio from my C550 is superior to my 765T and it is stereo!

2) Smartphones are getting better but my preference will be for WiFi enabled devices. Mobile Wifi (MiFi) is slowly taking off. At some point, I would expect to have a small access point in my car that provides WiFi service inside my vehicle. From there, any WiFi device such as a personal navigator or smartphone will be able to access the internet and retrieve current maps and traffic conditions. I would expect the device to cache map images in order to cut down on downloads but the net result being not needing quarterly updates.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

~

GadgetGuy2008 wrote:

For the last time, current smartphone gps apps (TomTom, CoPilot) STORE THE MAPS ON THE PHONE SO YOU CAN STILL CONTINUE TO NAVIGATE EVEN IF YOU LOSE CELL COVERAGE.

The ENTIRE MAPSET or, just what it needs in proximity to where you are??

--
*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

.

kch50428 wrote:
GadgetGuy2008 wrote:

For the last time, current smartphone gps apps (TomTom, CoPilot) STORE THE MAPS ON THE PHONE SO YOU CAN STILL CONTINUE TO NAVIGATE EVEN IF YOU LOSE CELL COVERAGE.

The ENTIRE MAPSET or, just what it needs in proximity to where you are??

The entire mapset. I purchased the CoPilot android app for a grand total of $5 and that includes the maps!! It has a PC program which allows you to download the maps (~1.6GB) using your PC and then transfer the maps to your phone via USB. I can't imagine how long it would take to download 1.6GB using 3G!

Not all smartphone apps involve full mapsets

Just sayin' from experience.

Many only cache a map for near where you are, and the map is updated as you move - requiring a data connection - and when that cell connection dies, and you go beyond the map last cached - you're done.

--
*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

Smartphone nice option

I have a Droid Incredible and the GPS is a nice option on it and in time I may love it, but I still prefer my Nuvi's.

765T

Aardvark wrote:

I currently have a 765T that I purchased in March and even then, I suspected it would probably be my last standalone GPS (at for Garmin). Two reasons:

1) The newer devices are removing the features I have gotten used to with the "older" devices. The newest devices do not have either an FM transmitter OR audio out jack to allow you to interface the audio to a more robust system. Therefore, you are at the mercy of the tinny inside speaker. I also like the MP3 player and that is gone as well. Yes, I have an iPod Touch 3G but I still like the MP3 feature. 3-D views are going away and, though I have not really used them, it is another feature removed. I amazed that the built-in audio from my C550 is superior to my 765T and it is stereo!

2) Smartphones are getting better but my preference will be for WiFi enabled devices. Mobile Wifi (MiFi) is slowly taking off. At some point, I would expect to have a small access point in my car that provides WiFi service inside my vehicle. From there, any WiFi device such as a personal navigator or smartphone will be able to access the internet and retrieve current maps and traffic conditions. I would expect the device to cache map images in order to cut down on downloads but the net result being not needing quarterly updates.

pretty much agree with you, the fm transmitter, and mp3 player of the 765 are really usefull tools, the 3D, and junction view not so much, saw the 3D when I was in Vancouver BC, wasn't impressed. The junction View I got to see where I90 West bound and I405 meet, wasn't too impressed by that, now the lane assist was really nice to have, I can't remember how it worked at the I90/I405 junction, at that junction there is a 2 lane off ramp, but you need to be in the correct lane for 405(right lane takes I405 north, left lane takes you to I405 south) decision portion is short, and if traffic is heavy you might not make it to the correct lane.

Oh, the wisdom of youth

I am amazed at how much I've learned in the 30+ years since I was 19 and was sure I knew everything. I'm guessing there's a few years spread here between us. Actually, I am an IT guy. In fact, my job is to keep my office on the cutting edge of technology and to this day, I have weekly visits of my ten yr old facility to see how we do just that.

He didn't bring his car charger because he charges his iPhone on his precious MacBook. Smartphones are great. I carry three of them actually. (Personal, work, and satellite) THEY aren't going anywhere, but as GPS devices, I think they are. I use my GPS 100S% of the time, not just to tell me where I'm going. I use it to avoid traffic, glance at alternate streets, estimate arrival time for meetings, see curves or intersections in roads when passing. I can't do all of that with my smartphones and still talk on them.

I don't want to pay the extra $15 mo for GPS service. Yea, I could go pay for an Android or another smartphone and increase my coolness significantly, and store maps locally, but why? The standalone sits on my dash. I upgrade maps periodically and load up POIs frequently. It's made to do one thing and does it very well. True, nobody's really impressed when I pull it out, but I gave up on impressing folks a long time ago as well.

Garmin will need to make some changes to their business model. Every business does or dies. They made a smartphone effort that didn't work so well. That's business. You can bet, they've got other products in the works. I can remember when Apple was dead. They put a LOT of effort into putting their products in schools, the Microsoft kicked their butts. Hmmmmm, now Apple's one of the world's richest (I mean cash) companies in the world because they came out with a slick portable music player. Oh, what one idea can do for a company.

Nope, not dumping my Garmin stock just yet.

Sounds Like Me

foghorn.legghorn wrote:

I am amazed at how much I've learned in the 30+ years since I was 19 and was sure I knew everything. I'm guessing there's a few years spread here between us. Actually, I am an IT guy. In fact, my job is to keep my office on the cutting edge of technology and to this day, I have weekly visits of my ten yr old facility to see how we do just that.

Sounds like me! 15 years ago I worked for a Fortune 10 company and I was with their "Skunk Works" group. I was one of the folks that brought the newfangled "Internet Thing" into the organization. I was doing IP over ham radio for years before that.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.
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