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Sattelite Problem????

 

This was taken from a column in Government Executive -

"I just finished reading the 40-page (actually 34 pages, subtracting three pages of acronyms and three blank pages) biennial report on the Global Positioning System, which Defense Chief Information Officer John Grimes submitted to Congress in October, and it looks like we could face a serious GPS satellite gap next year.

Of the 31 GPS satellites currently in orbit, 20 are past their design life and 19 lack redundancy in either their navigation or satellite systems or both, according to the report. Defense has enough new GPS birds in the pipeline to maintain an operational constellation (a minimum of 24 satellites are needed to ensure positioning accuracy), but if launches of the GPS IIF model birds are delayed, "sustainment of the GPS constellation will be difficult," the report noted.

Boeing has scheduled the launch of the GPS IIF satellites next year. That needs to happen not only to maintain the constellation but to ensure that the United States can operate in the new frequency that the International Telecommunications Union allocated for a third GPS civil signal, which is designed to support precision aviation navigation.

If the Defense Department does not get a satellite up and operating by August 2009, it could end up losing its ITU allocation. Google probably will grab it as part of its spectrum plans in its effort to rule the world."

The piece I picked up on was: "but to ensure that the United States can operate in the new frequency that the International Telecommunications Union allocated for a third GPS civil signal, which is designed to support precision aviation navigation."

How will the new frequencies and precision affect current end-user GPS units?

--
ɐ‾nsǝɹ Just one click away from the end of the Internet

That is very interesting.

That is very interesting. Will all current gps units become obsolete?

Satellites

epc2 wrote:

That is very interesting. Will all current gps units become obsolete?

I hope not!!!! No one will no how to get anywhere...LOST!!!!

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Bobby....Garmin 2450LM

seems to be a fly in the ointment

a_user wrote:

If the Defense Department does not get a satellite up and operating by August 2009, it could end up losing its ITU allocation. Google probably will grab it as part of its spectrum plans in its effort to rule the world.

I don't think that would happen! Lets see, USA Military or Google, Hmmmmmmm who will get the spot.
Who has been occupying the spot on the arc thus far?.

That sounds fishy to me.

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

Old units will still work

Our current equipment will continue to work just fine as the new birds go up and are put into service.

Geekspeak:

Newer receivers able to use the new civilian frequency (L2C, 1227.60 MHz) in addition to the existing civilian frequency (L1, 1575.42 MHz) will get better accuracy by being able to better compensate for ionospheric distortion.

Translated:

Newer receivers making use of the new signals can be more accurate.

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

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