Lithium Batteries Banned From Checked Bags

 

From 'Information Week' comes this article:
http://tinyurl.com/25jrsc

Starting Jan. 1, airline passengers will no longer be allowed to pack loose lithium batteries in checked luggage .....

RT

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"Internet: As Yogi Berra would say, "Don't believe 90% of what you read, and verify the other half."

Confusing or what!

Most of the latest (security) regulations prevent you taking things into the cabin that might be combustible - yet this regulation is using the opposite logic!

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------------------------ Phil Hornby, Stockport, England ----------------------               http://GeePeeEx.com - Garmin POI Creation made easy           »      

It makes some sense

I also thought it was a bit backward. Once you read through it though, it does make some sense. When I fly, all my spare batteries go with my carry on anyway. Most cosumer level batteries are fine for loose carry on.

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Chuck - Nuvi 200, Nuvi 255W

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Doc_Brown wrote:

Most cosumer level batteries are fine for loose carry on.

Ah, but it doesn't say they're "fine for carry on" - it says they're dangerous - so you must take them into the cabin!. Which seems at odds with the latest security regulations that try and ban even the most innocuous items from the cabin, because they might be dangerous.

The problems really start when you have to change planes. For example, if you fly from China to the UK, the Chinese will let you take things into the cabin that the British authorities don't allow. So if you arrive at Heathrow from China and have to then take a (UK) internal flight, you find yourself having to re-distribute all your belongings, before you can get on the onward flight! What was safe 13 hours earlier, has now become dangerous sad

Hopefully, this battery ruling will be enforced the same by all authorities...

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------------------------ Phil Hornby, Stockport, England ----------------------               http://GeePeeEx.com - Garmin POI Creation made easy           »      

Interesting.

It does make more sense after reading the article that it can be handled better by the crew just in case.

However what it identifies is the insufficiency of the fire suppression down in the cargo hold. One would think that the manufacturers would be getting new specs for redesigning the shortcoming. There is no way the general public will be aware of the pitfall and even if they do they might not understand the real reason so they will pack it anyway.

After reading the article I feel much safer for my flight on Friday shock

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nüvi 680, nüvi 770, Garmin Mobile XT, etc...

Change a year or more

We use 3.6 volt Lithium batteries all the time. About a year ago we had to start putting a label on all our shipping boxes that they were not allowed on passenger aircraft. Many of the batteries are made in France, and apparently one shipment caught fire. It was not in flight I don't think but at the airport. Anyway, that has been the case for a while.

Most passengers don't take several hundred batteries with them though...smile

Daniel

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Garmin StreetPilot c580 & Nuvi 760 - Member 32160 - Traveling in Kansas

Seems like I read somewhere

Seems like I read somewhere that you could take batteries but they had to be in the original package so that the batteries would not roll around and cause a spark. Forgot where I saw that.

Just found it - http://safetravel.dot.gov/

Specifys "loose" batteries

Check Here

mzrnva wrote:

Seems like I read somewhere that you could take batteries but they had to be in the original package so that the batteries would not roll around and cause a spark. Forgot where I saw that.

Just found it - http://safetravel.dot.gov/

Specifys "loose" batteries

I believe that link applies to batteries in general, with problems caused by shorting the terminals. Here is a link on the same website stating "no longer allow loose lithium batteries in checked baggage." because of fire problems with these batteries.
http://tinyurl.com/237b7v
This seems to backup what's stated in the original link.

RT

--
"Internet: As Yogi Berra would say, "Don't believe 90% of what you read, and verify the other half."

hi

Just came back from a trip and they confiscates all my loose batteries in my carry on....they have to be in a sealed package.

Loose Batteries?

If you use rechargeable Li Ion batteries for your consumer products, then chances are good that they are already out of their packages. Would a small protective battery holder meet the standards of "packaged"?

If I travel with my portable ham transceivers and have extra batteries (proprietary- not standard cells) in my check in or carry on, only the non-Lithium Ions will be allowed? The NiCad and NiMH forms are okay?

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Maps -> Wife -> Garmin 12XL -> StreetPilot 2610 -> Nuvi 660 (blown speaker) -> Nuvi 3790LMT