How about a POI of non-broadcast FM frequencies for MP3/IPOD/XM

 

Many people (like myself) have a devise in our car that allows us to play it wirelessly through our car stereo. I have this for my XM radio and ipod. The problem that many people have is that driving a long distance you have to find a new blank spot on the FM dial. Does anyone think this is a good idea and if so, send me their non-broadcast freq. in their area. This would include city, state, freq., lat, long.

Don't send me a message that I should use the cassette adapter. It works but like other people, I have too many wires in my car as it is.

Try FM stations

striper wrote:

Many people (like myself) have a devise in our car that allows us to play it wirelessly through our car stereo. I have this for my XM radio and ipod. The problem that many people have is that driving a long distance you have to find a new blank spot on the FM dial. Does anyone think this is a good idea and if so, send me their non-broadcast freq. in their area. This would include city, state, freq., lat, long.

Not sure if I completely understand your request, but the FM station POI (http://www.poi-factory.com/node/1109) lists all of the stations with the data you are requesting. While driving, you can see the frequencies of the 50 closest stations so you should be able to determine those frequencies which are not being used.

You can also use this file (in Excel) to sort data by city and state.

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Garmin StreetPilot c530, Mapsource

Spectrum Chart

You can go to this website to see what frequencies are free for your ZIP Code.

http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/home

Not sure how you would build a POI file with these data because you would need multiple frequencies tied to locations.

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><> Glenn <>< Garmin nüvi 2598

Good Idea

I understand this idea and I must say that it is a great one. I can't provide any good info yet but being in the same situation such a file would really ease some frustrations. Good Thinking

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Nuvi 350, etrex legend, compass, iBook

No Room

gdfaini wrote:

You can go to this website to see what frequencies are free for your ZIP Code.

http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/home

The good news is that this is a cool site. The bad news is what it said about Redondo Beach: We found no vacant frequencies on the FM dial in 90278 (Redondo Beach, California).

-sigh-

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- Keith

Looking for the opposite

To Mkhan

I guess you don't understand what I'm looking for. I want a file of non-broadcast frequencies so people driving distances and have a MP3 or other device that transmits onto a dead frequency would easily know what frequencies in selected areas don't have any broadcasts. This would be easier and faster than scanning the FM dial for a dead spot.

.

I understand what you are asking for, but I've never heard of such a list actually existing.

Format

It would require a list of frequencies by ZIP code, not address. I guess 1 point per ZIP code for ease of searching.

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><> Glenn <>< Garmin nüvi 2598

Did this (great) idea ever get off the ground?

If not, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't forget this resource.

http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/vacant

It is so cool! This site can tell you where there is a hole (if any) in the FM band for any given Zip Code. Then you can program your GPS to shortcast to your car's FM radio on the frequency with the least amount of competition from the terrestrial stations in that area.

Given that "striper"'s project didn't seem to get into the boat (sorry), I just checked the vacant frequencies along my most traveled route and found the one channel (92.3) that was good for most of my journey.

Stuff like this is what makes the internet truly amazing!

I agree that radio-locator

I agree that radio-locator is a great resource for finding stations as well as quiet frequencies wherever you go.

I rely on it for trip advanced planning!

Rob

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Maps -> Wife -> Garmin 12XL -> StreetPilot 2610 -> Nuvi 660 (blown speaker) -> Nuvi 3790LMT

Alternate for FM frequencies

striper wrote:

Many people (like myself) have a devise in our car that allows us to play it wirelessly through our car stereo. I have this for my XM radio and ipod. The problem that many people have is that driving a long distance you have to find a new blank spot on the FM dial. Does anyone think this is a good idea and if so, send me their non-broadcast freq. in their area. This would include city, state, freq., lat, long.

Don't send me a message that I should use the cassette adapter. It works but like other people, I have too many wires in my car as it is.

Some years ago I had a device that turned off the external antenna (am and fm) and allowed my CD/tapedeck etc signal in. Don't know if it would work here but it worked great for that purpose.

great site for radio information

DFSNapa wrote:

If not, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't forget this resource.

http://www.radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/vacant

It is so cool! This site can tell you where there is a hole (if any) in the FM band for any given Zip Code. Then you can program your GPS to shortcast to your car's FM radio on the frequency with the least amount of competition from the terrestrial stations in that area.

Given that "striper"'s project didn't seem to get into the boat (sorry), I just checked the vacant frequencies along my most traveled route and found the one channel (92.3) that was good for most of my journey.

Stuff like this is what makes the internet truly amazing!

I've used this to find radio stations in distant location (US and elsewhere) that I'm interested in. Some are on the air, some via the internet. Listening to a local station can give you some insite about politics, special events etc. Heck, I learned that the mattress commercials were the same as at home.

Belkin Tunecast

I found the best solution was an FM Transmitter that I bought this past fall. The Belkin Tunecast, cost about $40 at Walmart and plugs into the headphone connection of the IPod or other MP3 players.

It also has a USB port to charge the IPOD.

The model that I bought has a button that will go out and search for an empty frequency, as well as allowing you to save a couple of prefered frequencies.

On a recent trip to Florida and back, I found I had to change station js very infrequently, since it had enough power to overpower all but the more powerful stations. I had a cheap unit previously that had only 4 presets and I was constantly changing frequencies, due to it's lack of power.

I had 8G of music, put on shuffle and never had to waste time to find a good station. Also no yammering from the announcers and commercials.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350