Key FOB - Push Button Start

 

Hopefully, POI Factory will allow this FYI post and it helps others. My 2019 Odyssey has a FOB/Push Button Start. On 3 different occasions, it would not start and all I got was a weak clicking sound as if the car battery was dead. Thankfully, each time, a good samaritan (there are still some out there) was kind enough to jump start my vehicle. I had a difficult time believing that the car battery had gone bad in just 2 years and I was considering purchasing a new battery. At idle, the charge rate was 14+ volts and in the off state 12+ volts. What the heck??!!. Checking numerous Internet forums related to "no start" situations, I finally came across a suggestion to check the FOB battery (mine was a 2032 wafer type battery) and it tested at just a tick under 3 volts. I installed a new 2032 battery over a week ago and I have not had a "no start" situation since.
Apparently the car's electronics does not get along well with a low FOB battery! Now I carry a spare 2032 battery in the glove box. In retrospect, when the FOB battery was low the dash displays and the push button start were not as bright as normal and the brake pedal did not depress at all. Also, the lock/unlock button and the remote start function had not worked properly. The price of a FOB (2032) sure beat the price of a car battery or starter. An acquaintance just spent $1,000.00 for a starter at a dealer - I bet the dealer changed his FOB battery too - no accusations intended.

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Kudos to all at POI Factory - a great site!
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Similar situation

I had a similar situation over the weekend with a 2012 Lincoln MKX, also using the 2032 battery in the fob. Dash indicated “no key recognized” although the fob opened the car properly. The old battery measured 2,94 volts open circuit as I recall. I already carried spare batteries in the car but it made me research what would you do if you lacked a spare fob battery? The Lincoln has a special slot in the in the console bin where the fob is inserted and the car will start. The YouTube video demonstrated this with the fob battery removed! I haven’t had a chance to test that but intend too.

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John from PA

FOB

My Ford Explorer also has the start backup, by putting the fob in the console slot location . Also a key inside the fob to open the doors. I just replaced the battery a few weeks ago. I was alerted by a low battery warning on the console display. I waited a few days to replace the battery with no problems. Battery plus replaced the battery with a lifetime warranity.

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Charlie. Nuvi 265 WT and Nuvi 2597 LMT. MapFactor - Offline Maps & GPS.

Jeep, (Chrysler) has a

Jeep, (Chrysler) has a magnet inside the end opposite the hiden key. You use the concealed key to unlock the door and press the magnet end of the FOB against the start button and press and hold.

At two years I replaced one battery. The second FOB has never been used.

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Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

With all of these push

With all of these push button start type ignitions there's usually a dedicated spot you're supposed to hold the remote next to to get it to start when the remote battery is weak/dead. On the honda's I believe it's right next to the start button (check your owner's manual). Such was the case with our '15 accord.

If you keep the keys in the garage/near the car, expect the battery to die sooner than if the remote is a good distance away. I keep the spare remote apart to keep the battery from running down.

Probably a good idea to just replace the batteries every 2-3 years as general maintenance. They're cheap enough - cr2032.

Key Fob

I have a 2018 Camaro SS and I have a problem that my battery in key fob only lasts about 3 months and the dealer has no idea why.

fob to close to car maybe?

Steve620 wrote:

I have a 2018 Camaro SS and I have a problem that my battery in key fob only lasts about 3 months and the dealer has no idea why.

Nice car! Do you by chance have the car garaged and do something like leave the key fob in the car or hanging on a hook? Sometimes if the car and fob are in close proximity they continually "talk" to each other and drain the fob battery prematurely.

Another consideration, and as an example I use Lexus, their fobs can be disrupted by the Bluetooth circuitry of a cell phone. They have a service memo that essentially states that keeping the keys in the same pocket, or within 6" of certain phones would result in the key staying active and not going into standby.

Also, review where you leave the keys when the vehicle isn't being used. Don't put them near other electronic devices. Consider the use of a simple "Faraday cage", a simple metal can will work. I use a metal decorative tea canister.

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John from PA

Same Issue

I have the same problem with my 2022 Buick Encore. For some reason, the CR2032 FOB battery only lasts a month or so. I get the "no remote in vehicle" warning on the dash and the FOB unlock function gets erratic. Replacing the battery fixes the problem. The same thing happens with the second FOB that came with the vehicle.

I thought it might be due to a FOB button being accidentally depressed while in a pocket or purse but it happens even when the FOB is left in the console.

As mentioned above, I've been keeping a spare CR2032 battery in the glove box. If you do this, check the battery expiration date from time to time. On one occasion, I found the spare had gone dead when I went to use it. The battery was part of a bulk lot I bought cheap on Amazon. I found out the hard way when you keep an emergency spare, it pays to use a quality name brand battery.

Like John suggested

John from PA wrote:
Steve620 wrote:

I have a 2018 Camaro SS and I have a problem that my battery in key fob only lasts about 3 months and the dealer has no idea why.

Nice car! Do you by chance have the car garaged and do something like leave the key fob in the car or hanging on a hook? Sometimes if the car and fob are in close proximity they continually "talk" to each other and drain the fob battery prematurely.

Another consideration, and as an example I use Lexus, their fobs can be disrupted by the Bluetooth circuitry of a cell phone. They have a service memo that essentially states that keeping the keys in the same pocket, or within 6" of certain phones would result in the key staying active and not going into standby.

Also, review where you leave the keys when the vehicle isn't being used. Don't put them near other electronic devices. Consider the use of a simple "Faraday cage", a simple metal can will work. I use a metal decorative tea canister.

I discovered if my FOB's were close together, they seemed to be polling each other and stunted the battery life significantly.

I think regular ignition keys have it hands down over these FOB's

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Never argue with a pig. It makes you look foolish and it anoys the hell out of the pig!

Same thing on my Rogue.

Erratic behavior on lock/unlock, key not found. I changed the battery and it's been no issue.

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Nuvi 2460LMT.

I have a 2017 Hyundia Azera

I got in the car a couple of months ago and there was a notification on the dash that the key fob battery was low so I went to the store and bought a couple. I replaced the battery and the low battery notice went away. Then, a couple of weeks after that, the notification popped up again when my wife was in the car with me. I thought 'my battery can't be dead again this soon'. Then I thought 'it's my wife's fob'. Sure enough, I replaced her battery and the notice disappeared. So, apparently, even though she is not using her fob to start the car, the vehicle recognizes it and drains the battery. So lesson learned; change one battery, change the other. Also, I did not know how to start the car with a dead fob battery. So I went searching. Some older Hyundai's have slots either in the glove box or in the console where you stick in the fob to start the car. The newer models utilize the fob on the start button method. So, thanks to trippin08 for starting this post and teaching me me something that I did not know. Any day that you learn something new is a day that is not lost.

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It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

one would not think

that a dead fob battery creates a weak clicking sound at the car end, but I have a friend who got rid of a 2018 Odyssey due to various issues. He told me he wants a new car every 24 mos or so, but buying is cheaper. While I don't believe him, I don't want to argue because he knows everything lol

Also the dash would normally say something when you push the button but there is no fob that it detects, it shouldn't respond with a weak clicking. But I've never owned a Honda, from friends' stories over the last 10 years, they are not the "Honda" of the 80's, ie bulletproof. Apparently there are class actions related to brakes, trans, engine, etc.

For what it's worth, however, only Honda, and BMW, did the right thing with Takata. They provided free loaners to anyone who wanted one. All the other car cos. refused.

What timing!

After reading this thread, I went out and drove to a medical appointment this morning. My 2019 Subaru flashed a "weak fob battery" notice, the first I've ever seen in my 2.5-ish years of ownership. I'm pretty sure I have the proper replacement in my "battery drawer." What an odd coincidence. cool I am very glad that the car will recognize and alert me to the need for a replacement.

So maybe I should schedule an every-2-hr replacement...or maybe three since I don't know how long the fob had the original battery before I purchased the car.

I think I'll switch to my backup fob and see when it (never used, but probably "live" and using some current) goes bad and that will let me know to either change both every x.x years or replace the battery only in the one in use.

Subaru, check battery type

CraigW wrote:

After reading this thread, I went out and drove to a medical appointment this morning. My 2019 Subaru flashed a "weak fob battery" notice, the first I've ever seen in my 2.5-ish years of ownership. I'm pretty sure I have the proper replacement in my "battery drawer."

Some Subaru's use a CR2016 and some a CR2032 so you might want to check and keep an appropriate spare in the car...and teach the wife how to change it. smile

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John from PA

My fobs have 2 cases. Guess

My fobs have 2 cases. Guess how I found out they are waterproof!

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Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

amazon

bdhsfz6 wrote:

As mentioned above, I've been keeping a spare CR2032 battery in the glove box. If you do this, check the battery expiration date from time to time. On one occasion, I found the spare had gone dead when I went to use it. The battery was part of a bulk lot I bought cheap on Amazon. I found out the hard way when you keep an emergency spare, it pays to use a quality name brand battery.

My experience with Amazon is that the battery is likely a knockoff, even if it is claimed to be a name brand. This costs money not only to replace the battery, but leaking batteries can damage equipment. (not coin cells, but alkaline AAA, AA, D etc.)

The key fob is important safety equipment and the battery should be the best available.

I do not order batteries online. I only buy in a local store like Home Depot or Staples. Only Energizer or Duracell. Only with an expiration date 10 years away. Do not buy without the date.

Last year I bought a number of Ray-O-Vac in all sizes. What a mistake! At least 10 pieces of equipment had to be replaced due to leakage including a programmable thermostat ($150-), AA LED Mini Maglight ($33-), TV remote ($32-).

subaru fob

If my 2019 Subaru Forester key fob goes dead, the car can be driven. Unlatch the metal key from within the fob and insert it into the door handle.

Open the door, and the alarm (horn) will sound continously. "No problem!" you say. "Silence it by pressing the fob." This will not work. The fob is dead!

To silence the alarm, go into the car and press the start-ignition button once to the Accessory position. Then touch the outside driver's door handle and the alarm will stop. (I haven't tried this)

Then insert the key in its receptacle low on the dashboard and the engine can be started.

the same way

phranc wrote:

My fobs have 2 cases. Guess how I found out they are waterproof!

Probably you found out the same way that I did (on both cars with smart keys/fobs, not just 1)! hahahahahahaha

I do like smart keys, 2/3 of our cars have them, but only 1/3 has a push to start. My 2006, although it has a smart key and doors lock unlock individually by touch, it still has a twist to start, with fob in pocket.

Personally, I've always loved the button, my 2007 has it. As recently as 6-7 years ago, there were stories of people forgetting to shut the cars off. Although I never fully understood the reasoning, it seemed to be that if they left the car running in the garage and went into the house with the fob, they believed that the car would turn off? Not sure why they would think that. I would think maybe they've mistaken the scenario with On*Star and the various assists that can help shut the engines safely off in the case of theft...

REMOTE starts usually have a

REMOTE starts usually have a 10-15 minute timer, when actuated. I expected my Cherokee to turn off the first time I found out I could walk away, say at a convenience store. But it did not. Just more fodder for an old brain to try to remember.

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Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

Erratic keyfob batteries

Yeah some of those wafer batteries last for many years, and others need more frequent replacement. It's nice to have a feature like the Ford Explorer and Subaru instrument displays as noted above that signals you that your keyfob battery is getting weak. My vehicles don't have that.

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"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

Ford products use grease

Ford products use a grease on the fob battery terminations and the manual has this specific instruction when replacing the fob battery.

"Do not wipe off any grease on the battery terminals or on the back surface of the circuit board."

Ford is not specific about what type of grease this is, but I suspect it may be dielectric grease which reduces corrosion of electrical contacts. One problem with many of these extreme low current draw devices is build up of corrosion at the microscopic level.

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John from PA

imho

John from PA wrote:

Ford products use a grease on the fob battery terminations and the manual has this specific instruction when replacing the fob battery.

"Do not wipe off any grease on the battery terminals or on the back surface of the circuit board."

Ford is not specific about what type of grease this is, but I suspect it may be dielectric grease which reduces corrosion of electrical contacts. One problem with many of these extreme low current draw devices is build up of corrosion at the microscopic level.

unneeded, and also there might be a misconception but while the grease does prevent corrosion, but it does not conduct electricity, it acts as an insulator. With such tiny contact points, I would never use it. Just as I would never use anti seize on lug nuts or spark plugs. my .02 ymmv

this thread

also reminded me...I bought my Lexus used in 2016, 10 years old.

When I got it, unfortunately, I found brakes shuddering and the driver door did not lock. All the door handles appeared deactivated as far as locking/unlocking.

I guess it was a good thing it was a new car dealer that I bought the car from--the used car salesman was utterly useless, BUT, the service manager was very friendly to me and he fixed the above with genuine Lexus parts (have the empty Toyota boxes and used parts returned). It was here that I learned that caliper bolts must be replaced on a brake job, and Toyota brake wear sensors cost multiples of BMW, maybe 3-4X, unreal (they listed out all the parts with list prices and net $0).

Once they replaced the driver door actuator for the lock, suddenly all the smart features worked again. To their credit, I could find zero evidence of the work--I thought for sure something would be broken or not put back. Likely the plastic "saran wrap" lining is undone under the door panel. But 5.5 years later the actuator never stopped working.

Stupidly, when I went to replace the battery for the first time, nah, I didn't read the manual. Why would I? I know best it's not hard to figure it out. I pried the door off and broke it hahahahahahahahaha

Getting a new Lexus fob and having it programmed wasn't even a consideration. Duct tape to the rescue!

My wife said it's so ghetto and the used car came with 2/3 original fobs. The valet fob was missing.

Went on eBay, and I scored a valet fob for $15, no joke. The electronics are useless without programming, key is useless as well. BUT, the door was usable--I took the door off and put it on the fob I broke. Part of breaking the door of the fob? The key which can be extended, does not lock in an extended position.

I was at a Flyers game and conveniently the battery died. I needed to use the key to physically open the door, and I had to borrow a paper clip to keep it extended.

Moral of the story is take the 2 min to check the manual to see how the fob opens, or just check YouTube.

p.s. on my car the forum pointed out that the tool kits and first aid are almost always stolen in the used car process and for sale on eBay. I managed to find one for $40 (cheap) and it even had unopened panasonic batteries for the flashlight. I like putting things back the way they once were on old cars...

In 2018..

phranc wrote:

REMOTE starts usually have a 10-15 minute timer, when actuated. I expected my Cherokee to turn off the first time I found out I could walk away, say at a convenience store. But it did not. Just more fodder for an old brain to try to remember.

This isn't specific to the OP's issue but it raises another question related to these FOB's.

In 2018, the New York Times reported at least 28 carbon monoxide deaths from cars being started indoors accidentally via these remote starters.

There was a local incident last year where grandparents were killed by exhaust fumes when their granchild started a car while playing with the FOB.

Most of these remote start systems have an auto shutoff feature if the vehicle isn't moved for a preset period of time. However,it doesn't take long for carbon monoxide to reach toxic levels in a closed space.

Some systems only work when the temperature is below a preset level. This doesn't offer much protection when vehicles are kept in attached unheated garages.

Our new Buick has this remote start feature. The vehicle is kept in a heated garage so we don't need or want the feature. It was part of an option package and couldn't be deleted.

The dealer says the feature can be disabled but the manual doesn't say how to do it. We're taking the vehicle in for it's first oil change next week and I'm thinking of asking him to do it.

I realize this system, like so many others, is perfectly safe if used responsibly but with so many fatalities, Are they a significant safety issue? Are there other safeguards I'm not aware of?

when

bdhsfz6 wrote:
phranc wrote:

REMOTE starts usually have a 10-15 minute timer, when actuated. I expected my Cherokee to turn off the first time I found out I could walk away, say at a convenience store. But it did not. Just more fodder for an old brain to try to remember.

This isn't specific to the OP's issue but it raises another question related to these FOB's.

In 2018, the New York Times reported at least 28 carbon monoxide deaths from cars being started indoors accidentally via these remote starters.

There was a local incident last year where grandparents were killed by exhaust fumes when their granchild started a car while playing with the FOB.

Most of these remote start systems have an auto shutoff feature if the vehicle isn't moved for a preset period of time. However,it doesn't take long for carbon monoxide to reach toxic levels in a closed space.

Some systems only work when the temperature is below a preset level. This doesn't offer much protection when vehicles are kept in attached unheated garages.

Our new Buick has this remote start feature. The vehicle is kept in a heated garage so we don't need or want the feature. It was part of an option package and couldn't be deleted.

The dealer says the feature can be disabled but the manual doesn't say how to do it. We're taking the vehicle in for it's first oil change next week and I'm thinking of asking him to do it.

Are these systems really safe? Are there other safeguards I'm not aware of?

We bought a 2011 Buick new, and back then it had a 4/50 warranty just like all premium cars (we used it day 1462 and were assured by the GMC dealer because we called in advance we would be under warranty--we weren't. But I didn't pay either). It said alternate transportation too, I didn't realize that meant shuttle, thought it meant loaner car! lol

I wish they made their own version of the new Tahoe/Escalade.

Anyway, as mentioned, I never understood the CO issues, other than maybe people assume no fob, engine shuts off, and that's not necessarily the case?

Unless it has changed, European cars do not have remote start capability as they've always considered that a waste of fuel, and a harm to the carbon footprint of the vehicle. There is no need to warm up a modern vehicle (but that is not to say jack rabbit starts are good, either). So I don't know why American cars offer that feature.

I would think it can be disabled. On ours, since we don't have a smart key, one would have to press lock, and then press the start, for it to happen--two steps. So it's easy to avoid accidentally remote starting...

remote start

My 2019 Subaru has remote start. It is only on a special fob, not the one used for access or using the start button. If I remove the battery from the remote start fob, the feature is disabled.

If the car is unlocked, the remote start will not work. It is made that way for security purposes if the car is parked on the street.

The Subaru will only run for 10 minutes before shutting down. That is long enough to supply enough CO, carbon monoxide, to kill someone. Every house should have a combination smoke and CO detector with a 120-volt hardwired connection to other smoke detectors. That way they will all sound when one detects fire or CO.

The CO detector is needed just for the heating system or any gas appliances.

The dealer service department should be able to disable the feature using software settings.

You may not need a warm up

You may not need a warm up where you are, but if the temps are in the low/sub zeros, it helps make the ice easier to remove.

And if you are in Arizona where the temps frequently exceed 110°, running that AC for a few minutes before you get in is sure a blessing.

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Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

phranc is right

pfranc is right. To scrape off the ice, the car must be idled for about 10 minutes.

As much as I hate our

As much as I hate our detached garage, in this case it's a blessing. Run the car for however long without worries of CO poisoning. Of course I rarely if ever use remote start as I consider it a gimmick. Remote start doesn't work with MT cars and/or bad things would happen if it was made to work with car left in gear.

Usual start routine is to start it with me in the car, idle it until it drops some (1500 - 1000), then gently go. Take it easy first mile or two.

You are entitled to your opinion, but...

johnnatash4 wrote:
John from PA wrote:

Ford products use a grease on the fob battery terminations and the manual has this specific instruction when replacing the fob battery.

"Do not wipe off any grease on the battery terminals or on the back surface of the circuit board."

Ford is not specific about what type of grease this is, but I suspect it may be dielectric grease which reduces corrosion of electrical contacts. One problem with many of these extreme low current draw devices is build up of corrosion at the microscopic level.

unneeded, and also there might be a misconception but while the grease does prevent corrosion, but it does not conduct electricity, it acts as an insulator. With such tiny contact points, I would never use it. Just as I would never use anti seize on lug nuts or spark plugs. my .02 ymmv

First of all John let me say you are entitled to your opinion, and certainly your past content would indicate it will rarely if ever be changed. But having said that I suggest you read the content at https://www.nyelubricants.com/myth-grease-interferes-with-co... or at https://www.w8ji.com/dielectric_grease_vs_conductive_grease..... As I said Ford is not specific as to whether the grease is dielectric but it pretty much is the opinion of experts (I count myself as one, having worked in the lectronics industry for 25 years) that the abiity of a dielectric grease to be anti-corrosive far outweighs it anti-conductive property. Quoting from my first link, a manufacturer of a dielectric grease "The results of these tests prove that there is no difference in contact resistance between lubricated and unlubricated connectors. Grease fills in the microscopic valleys of the contact surface and is squeezed out of the asperities, allowing the current to flow and preventing oxidation from occurring. While there is no difference in conductivity, the water resistance test proves that dielectric grease offers protection that unlubricated connectors cannot."

Now, as to your comment "Just as I would never use anti seize on lug nuts or spark plugs." Some manufacturers recommend the use of anti-seize products but the caveat is they mention very specific places where it is to be used. Porsche recommends to use anti seize but its use depends on the material of the lug nut. Have aluminum nuts and aluminum wheels? Porsche recommends "lubricate threads and shoulders of aluminum nuts with Optimoly TA".

So probably best to review what the manufacturer recommends, then form your opinion. But in the case of Ford, or perhaps other manufacturers, keep in mind that buy several million fobs a year, and something that might only cost one cent would be discontinued if it didn't matter. I also just looked inside one of my Lincoln fobs, and a warning to not remove the grease is printed on the internal surface of the fob case.

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John from PA

?

John from PA wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:
John from PA wrote:

Ford products use a grease on the fob battery terminations and the manual has this specific instruction when replacing the fob battery.

"Do not wipe off any grease on the battery terminals or on the back surface of the circuit board."

Ford is not specific about what type of grease this is, but I suspect it may be dielectric grease which reduces corrosion of electrical contacts. One problem with many of these extreme low current draw devices is build up of corrosion at the microscopic level.

certainly your past content would indicate it will rarely if ever be changed.

?

I miss the old keys (with a

I miss the old keys (with a built-in transponder for effective anti-theft) instead of the fobs that require batteries to start the car and are vectors for high tech but increasingly common car theft.

Garage

Don't have a garage, car not driven all the time maybe once a week and if weather is nice, stays covered up all the time. I just changed battery going to try and put Key remote into can.

One more thing to pay for

Toyota apparently has started a "subscription" service for use of the remote start capability built into key fobs on MY 2018 and later. Read the article at https://www.thedrive.com/news/43329/toyota-made-its-key-fob-...

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John from PA

Hyundai offers a remote start subscription

I don’t subscribe to the service because it is tied to BlueLink, Hyundai’s version of GM’s OnStar. The caveat to using remote start is that it has to be used at least once every four days. If you don’t, it disconnects from BlueLink and you have to manually start the car. My car will sit sometimes for a week or more without being started so the feature is of no use to me.

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It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

whale oil beef hooked

changed the battery, now car starts easy-as
of all the, head-slap why didn't I think of that, moments

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If only ..

$$$ for remote start!@#

John from PA wrote:

Toyota apparently has started a "subscription" service for use of the remote start capability built into key fobs on MY 2018 and later. Read the article at https://www.thedrive.com/news/43329/toyota-made-its-key-fob-remote-start-into-a-subscription-service

That's quite disgusting. What does a rf fob have to do with an internet connected service. Nothing. Just another money grab. My car has remote start (which I rarely use). Doubt i'd ever pay for this "convenience".

two remote starts available

zx1100e1 wrote:
John from PA wrote:

Toyota apparently has started a "subscription" service for use of the remote start capability built into key fobs on MY 2018 and later. Read the article at https://www.thedrive.com/news/43329/toyota-made-its-key-fob-remote-start-into-a-subscription-service

That's quite disgusting. What does a rf fob have to do with an internet connected service. Nothing. Just another money grab. My car has remote start (which I rarely use). Doubt i'd ever pay for this "convenience".

For my 2019 Subaru, there are two remote starts available:

1) All cars come with the internet-connected remote start. An app on the cellphone uses the 4G internet connection built in to the car (similar to Onstar) to provide remote start and a package of features, which has a monthly charge. If you don't sign up, the system remains unused at no charge.

2) The optional key fob remote start is available from the Subaru dealer for a sustantial one-time fee. This avoids any monthly fee or subscription. This was installed on my car and has two key fobs.

In my opinion, it is advisable to sign up for the Subaru key fob system and not an aftermarket key fob remote start. The security system and the ignition is involved. The dealer says that the aftermarket system would void Subaru warranties.

I never had remote start on

I never had remote start on any car so it's not something I really care about. Also, past car was a manual so remote start would be a bad idea. I don't believe in the concept of warming the car up for 10 min before you go. Enter the garage (detached), start the car, let it idle for 30-60 seconds for idle to drop some then go gently for the first few miles. Any more idling that that is just a waste of gas unless you're in alaska.

The stinger (22 gtline) came with remote start built into the keyfob as standard equipment. There is some kind of app/4g link which I still haven't signed onto and probably never will. I'm sure the car reports plenty telemetry back to the mothership without the subscription. If I had to pay any extra for any remote start i'd of course decline it.

If it's an important feature to someone, agreed, they should go with a factory option for fewer headaches down the line.

One plus

zx1100e1 wrote:

...
If it's an important feature to someone, agreed, they should go with a factory option for fewer headaches down the line.

I do have the smartphone-based remote unlock and remote start. I also never preheat the car, although I do like heated front seats in the winter. But one plus to having an optional unlock and start method is if you're in the middle of nowhere and have lost your key or fob—or even at home ready to go to a doc appointment and can't find the key/fob. There's even another no-cost way to get into a locked Subaru, at least for some models and maybe trim levels. I can press my rear hatchback lock button several times, pause, repeat four more times, and my chosen five-digit unlock code will open the doors. It's a pain to do but will get you into the car.

^^Can't you just remove the

^^Can't you just remove the physical key to unlock the door the old fashion way?

My G, accord and stinger all have a physical key inside the fob for this reason. Of course, if the trunk doesn't open, things get more challenging on the stinger.

Yes

zx1100e1 wrote:

^^Can't you just remove the physical key to unlock the door the old fashion way?

My G, accord and stinger all have a physical key inside the fob for this reason. Of course, if the trunk doesn't open, things get more challenging on the stinger.

Yes, if the question is directed at me. But a lost Subaru fob means the physical "key" that can be pulled out of a battery-failed fob would also be lost. Hence the benefit of the smartphone-based alternative and truck lock code.

I don't understand your trunk issue.

FOB

On my Explorer you have to have the FOB in your pocket to open the rear gate and it does not unlock the rest of the doors. Ford gave me two FOB's with keys inside plus a extra key that I keep on another key ring. Have a key pad located on the driver side door for entry that does not need the FOB. So pretty well covered to get inside vehicle and get it started.

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Charlie. Nuvi 265 WT and Nuvi 2597 LMT. MapFactor - Offline Maps & GPS.

I just love...

my 2009 chevy Colorado, no remote start and the key FOB only unlocks the doors or blows the horn. That's more than enough for me.

--
Garmin Nuvi 765T, Garmin Drive 60LM

no cookie for you!

CraigW wrote:

Yes, if the question is directed at me. But a lost Subaru fob means the physical "key" that can be pulled out of a battery-failed fob would also be lost. Hence the benefit of the smartphone-based alternative and truck lock code.

I don't understand your trunk issue.

Losing a fob is an issue. Haven't experienced that my self... yet. Suppose anything is possible. In the last decade, all my cars have had push button start where the fob stays in the pocket. Doors unlock by either pressing a button on the handle or touching the handle (honda). Trunks open similarly. Unless I'm changing pants somewhere, chance of fob growing legs and leaving is unlikely smile. At home the primary fob has its own place. If it's not in my pocket its in its holder. Spare fob is elsewhere.

Re trunk; To unlock the hatch in the stinger, the doors have to be unlocked or the fob has to be near by. Ok. But, what if the lock solenoid fails - doesn't disengage/unlock hatch. There is a manual pull but you access it from inside the car.

Specifically, one of the seats has to be folded, then you contort your way in to reach the handle which at the far end of the trunk area (relative to passenger area), immediately on the back side of the latch. There's a small cover that's removed then a handle moved to unlock.

Here's the page from the owner's manual. They advise to not get inadvertently locked in the trunk. The whole process is a pain in the @ss.

https://i.imgur.com/SRPH7Ax.png

My G had a similar deal but there was a passthrough slot that could be opened in the rear seats. This too was difficult to reach until I added a cable tie pull.

https://i.imgur.com/XRTvuDJ.png

The honda was the easiest, there was a manual lever to the side of the driver's seat, cable operated.

Realistically I never had a failure occur, but one should know how to get into their trunk if the fob fails. A more realistic scenario is a dead car battery. Stinger have the battery in the trunk. In that case, one could use the embedded fob key to unlock the door. That gets you inside the car. The hood can now be opened. Inside the hood fuse box is a terminal for jumping the car. A 12V source can be applied to that & gnd to provide enough juice to open the trunk lid.

Here's a youtube video describing such scenario.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMoEZOX_MKs

snow ice

zx1100e1 wrote:

I never had remote start on any car so it's not something I really care about. Also, past car was a manual so remote start would be a bad idea. I don't believe in the concept of warming the car up for 10 min before you go. Enter the garage (detached), start the car, let it idle for 30-60 seconds for idle to drop some then go gently for the first few miles. Any more idling that that is just a waste of gas unless you're in alaska.

The stinger (22 gtline) came with remote start built into the keyfob as standard equipment. There is some kind of app/4g link which I still haven't signed onto and probably never will. I'm sure the car reports plenty telemetry back to the mothership without the subscription. If I had to pay any extra for any remote start i'd of course decline it.

If it's an important feature to someone, agreed, they should go with a factory option for fewer headaches down the line.

My 2013 Jeep Wrangler JKU (4 door hardtop) has remote start. It was factory installed.
I love it. I leave the defroster set on and when there's snow or ice on the Jeep, since I don't have a garage, I ue the remote start so it'll warm up the windows and the ice/snow comes off easy as pie. I do the reverse in the summer when it's ungodly hot, leave the AC set to on and the black Jeep doesn't feel like a sauna when I get in it.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Key FOBs

None of my vehicles have this only a FOB to unlock the doors, but I just read where Toyota is going to start charging for the remote start after a trail period.

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

97 Honda Civic

Just the key. I vaguely remember having a key fob at some point in the past, but I believe it when down almost a decade ago.
Surprisingly enough we had another random person come to the door last week asking if I wanted to sell my civic. It happens every couple of years. I considered it a few years ago, so asked a few friends with cars that I liked, if they would let me drive them to coffee in their car to get the feel. It seems to me that car windows are no longer made in a way for the driver to use them to see what's around them. I found it disturbing. So I'll keep my little key fob-less civic for as long as I can. I guess this makes it official, I'm an old fogey! Now if those damn kids would stay off my lawn!

~Angela

Nope

GlobeTurtle wrote:

... I guess this makes it official, I'm an old fogey! Now if those damn kids would stay off my lawn!

~Angela

You're still young until you start yelling and waving your fists at clouds blocking your sunny day. twisted I prefer that definition since, by it, I'm still young.

Supposedly defroster can crack a windshield

soberbyker wrote:

My 2013 Jeep Wrangler JKU (4 door hardtop) has remote start. It was factory installed.
I love it. I leave the defroster set on and when there's snow or ice on the Jeep, since I don't have a garage, I use the remote start so it'll warm up the windows and the ice/snow comes off easy as pie. I do the reverse in the summer when it's ungodly hot, leave the AC set to on and the black Jeep doesn't feel like a sauna when I get in it.

Although I suspect it requires a unique set of circumstances, some sources say the defroster going full blast on a windshield can crack it. See https://www.kdrv.com/content/news/Are-you-Properly-Defrostin...

--
John from PA

Weak/dead battery happened

Weak/dead battery happened to me too. Fortunately, my car allows me to remove the button and insert the FOB into a slot, which started my car.

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