Gas under $1/gallon

 

I just checked Gas Buddy and there is a town in Wisconsin where unleaded is $0.999/gallon. Devlan, WI.

I live near Eau Claire, WI where is recently dropped to $1.499. Too bad we can't go anywhere.

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Garmin Nuvi 2450
Page 1>>

Still over $3 at most gas

Still over $3 at most gas stations in Southern California. When Californians see $1/gallon, other states will likely charge 1 cent per gallon. Or worse, it is the end of the world.

wow

chewbacca wrote:

Still over $3 at most gas stations in Southern California. When Californians see $1/gallon, other states will likely charge 1 cent per gallon. Or worse, it is the end of the world.

CA is second only to PA in gas taxes but here in PA the average is around $2.20 with one not to far from me at $1.99.

My local grocery store has gas points, 10 cent a gallon off for every $100 you spend. Currently I have $0.60 in saved gas points, at the current regular price that would get me gas for $1.60. The trouble is, I had just filled up at $2.29 a day before the COVID-19 hit. My job is deemed non essential so I'm not working and we can't go anywhere. By the time I use this tank of gas the prices will have jumped up again.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

99 cents in KY

Actually GasBuddy reported 99¢ per gallon gas in London KY on 19 Mar 2020. See:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/kentucky-gas-station...

Countries refused to reduce crude production (they need money) which lowered the price per barrel for crude oil. The Covid-19 pandemic has reduced the consumption of Jet fuel and gasoline, so I expect that before it's over gas will be even lower.

It takes about 30 days for a refinery to shut down and just as long to get it back up and running (may be quicker now than it was 20 yrs ago). So the refiners will think twice about ceasing production. But I bet somebody "bites the bullet" before too long.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

be prepared

be prepared for new gas taxes

Could it be?

For what it's worth. Wholesale Unleaded gas futures have been about $1.50-$1.60 a gallon for most of the last year. Now for May they have been as low as $0.46 and as of yesterday(Thursday) were $0.60 a gallon.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT

in the last

3 weeks, my wife and I have driven about 55 miles, and we have 4 cars. Cheap gasoline isn't going to help the current situation. But it is a lesson going back to I believe microeconomics.

If someone were to ask, "What happened to the price of gas?" Could you explain? again imho I think most people having graduated HS, would be able to give a basic explanation based on current events. And my questions are rhetorical.

What's your demand for unleaded gasoline at $0.46/gal? Mine is zero. I don't need any--there isn't any place to go, consumption is nearly zero.

But my wife ventured out to Costco and here in PA I was surprised regular was $1.899. Remember, PA is expensive. We have the highest taxes in the nation on gasoline I was told (shows that it's a market where the west and northwest is a lot more overall for price). I hear that Delaware is another 15 cents less.

Gas

Austin Tx. is in the $1.60 range.

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FJM

washington state

regular is about $2.67.9 it was over $3.00 about a month ago the price varies a little from in town to the suburbs it seems the gas stations here are slow to lower the price but quick to raise them !

What about Diesel?

I drive a Diesel BMW. The price of Diesel dropped about $.20 in NY. I too am watching gasoline prices plummet from just over $3 a gallon to about $2 now in some places on Long Island. Also, when is my heating oil going to reflect this drop? Most unfair if you ask me. Truckers have been griping about this for years.

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Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

I'm in Washington State..

Bought regular yesterday for $2.49

Looks like the bottom.

Looks like the price is at or close to the bottom. Refineries are going down right now for semi annual maintenance and switch to summer gasoline. Likely they will extend the shutdown to reduce the oversupply of refined products. When they do start up again. Summer gasoline is more expensive to make. So likely it will show up at the pumps.

Lowest price in VA

The lowest price in VA is in Buckingham, VA @ $1.12 a gallon!

It's $1.49 @ Sams Club & Costco in Newport News. I believe it will go below $1.00 before too long.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

Big delta

metricman wrote:

It's $1.49 @ Sams Club & Costco in Newport News

Here in Albuquerque NM those two have been at $1.35 for a few days. But the rest of the stations stretch out above them over a much broader range than usual. Just now GasBuddy reports that the site average for recent reports is $1.84.

There is going to be a lot of blood on the floor by the time this is over.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

are

you guys driving? It almost seems like you're interpreting a negative economic situation as a positive!

Gas Prices

The lowest I have seen so far arund Baltimore, Maryland is $1.89/gal.

That's amazing !

well

johnnatash4 wrote:

you guys driving? It almost seems like you're interpreting a negative economic situation as a positive!

Some people are still required to work. Are they supposed to walk?

The gas thing is strictly supply-and-demand. Demand is down therefore prices drop to sell it. I for one intend to take advantage of the low prices.

--
I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

No benefit for me

The lower prices are no benefit for me. I saw this coming two months ago and kept the tanks full on both of our cars so I could minimize my need to go get gas after the contagion exploded, as was obviously going to happen.

Fortunately, I am now working from home and only have to go out rarely for unplanned necessities, so buying fuel for our cars should not be an issue for many weeks. (Unplanned necessities are definitely unplanned - my wife has degenerated disks in her back and the heat pad that helps reduce her pain died this morning, so I went out out to buy a new one to help her as quickly as possible.)

Personally, I am not going to lose any sleep over not benefiting from the drop in gas prices. Since I expect the gas currently in our cars to last until this is over, I calculate my *maximum* "loss" to be 2 cars x 18 gal per car x price drop per gallon, or about 2x18x1.5 = $54. This is much less than I have already saved by driving only a trivial amount per week instead of the pre-virus norm.

- Tom -

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XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

Central Florida $1.87

Lowest I've seen in Central Florida, here in Lakeland between Tampa and Orlando is $1.87. I'm a contract photojournalist, so I still have to venture out a little bit and eat up some gas. However, it's nothing compared to the normal driving I would be doing.

Gas

The price is $1.55 in Salina, Utah Right on I-70

Did you fill-up, Dean?

w7dhh wrote:

The price is $1.55 in Salina, Utah Right on I-70

Did you fill-up, Dean?

--
Politicians and Diapers must be changed often for the exact same reason...

Low Gas Prices

1.32 at Sam's

current

KenSny wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

you guys driving? It almost seems like you're interpreting a negative economic situation as a positive!

Some people are still required to work. Are they supposed to walk?

The gas thing is strictly supply-and-demand. Demand is down therefore prices drop to sell it. I for one intend to take advantage of the low prices.

"Strictly supply-and-demand." That wasn't the reason that oil collapsed. I think you're being facetious, but this is the internet so that often doesn't show i.e. can be misinterpreted through a post. The other possibility is of course maybe you're not following current events with regard to oil.

More than Supply & Demand

johnnatash4 is correct. There are so many variables involved that affect the price.

Gas prices started dropping before the current pandemic due to Russia NOT agreeing with Saudi Arabia that they would cut crude production (Russia's economy is not in good shape - no matter what they say). So Crude Oil prices dropped due to oversupply on the Crude market. Cheaper Crude lowers the price of gas & diesel.

The Pandemic caused the demand for all petroleum refined products to decrease, mainly Jet fuel and gasoline due to lower demand causing oversupply. Diesel is still being used a lot because the trucks (and trains) still have to deliver food and essential items(like toilet paper exclaim ) that we need, so it has decreased less.

Other factors (besides road and sales taxes) are the chemicals that the EPA requires the refineries to add to gasoline for the summer to reduce tailpipe emissions due to increased driving.

The EPA also requires additional chemicals for high smog areas. For instance - for JUST ONE DAY in Norfolk (near where I live) the pollution exceeded the Federal Guidelines and the EPA required that all gasoline sold in the Metro area have an extra additive to reduce emissions. This included my area 40 miles away, but not Gloucester county across the York river (closer than me) and gas there is 5¢ to 10¢ a gallon cheaper than it is here. But there is a Toll Bridge to get there ($2.00 for 2 axles), so you need a big tank to make it worth the trip. BTW gas is cheaper at Sams Club than in Gloucester - it's 10 more miles but with no toll.

You also have to consider "Zone Pricing". The refiners set the prices for tanker delivered fuel for "Affluent" areas higher than they do for lower income areas and have been doing this for years!

On top of all this is the "Futures Market" where you you can buy Crude, Gas, Jet Fuel, Diesel and other petroleum fuels in the "Future". I don't know exactly how that works, as you have to predict what the price will be at a certain time and if you buy it too high - you lose. If you buy it low and the price is higher - you win. Millions of dollars have been made this way and millions have been lost as well.

So it's a very complex market and is constantly in flux. Many more factors involved that I did not mention.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

But ....

metricman wrote:

~snip~

So it's a very complex market and is constantly in flux. Many more factors involved that I did not mention.

What I want to know is why, when crude goes down, the price takes a month to reach the pump, but when crude goes up, the price goes up immediately at the pump, even on the gas was already in their in ground tank bought at the lower price.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Simple math

soberbyker wrote:
metricman wrote:

~snip~

So it's a very complex market and is constantly in flux. Many more factors involved that I did not mention.

What I want to know is why, when crude goes down, the price takes a month to reach the pump, but when crude goes up, the price goes up immediately at the pump, even on the gas was already in their in ground tank bought at the lower price.

I managed a Sunoco station for 5 years in the 70's, but this still applies today.

Gasoline suppliers DO NOT sell gas on credit to independent gas stations. They do not want to take someone to court should the station, or wholesaler, go out of business. Most stations have 8000+ gallon tanks because an 18 wheel tank truck holds 8000 gallons max - it's a weight thing. The tank trucks do have different compartments so that you can "split" the load between regular and high test and/or diesel. 8000 gallons of fuel is a lot of money. Most large amounts of money is now transferred electronically today.

So, you just got a load of gas at your station and the next day the wholesale price jumps up 10¢ a gallon. Your next load will cost you $800 more. So to avoid having to go to a bank to borrow money, it's easier to just raise the price at the pump and have the cash on hand. Banks move very slow on loan applications and you could run out of gas before it gets approved. Also, since there is not a lot of money to be made selling gas (unless you are a high volume retailer) you have to sell food and drinks to survive. Average markup for gas used to be 10¢ a gallon. I don't know what it is now and it's a very competitive market.

The same applies to the wholesalers and the refineries. When crude goes up in price, the refinery has to pay cash. We're talking millions now. So they raise the price of their fuel that they have in stock so they can pay for the next shipload or pipeline shipment. This applies to the wholesaler as well.

Now when the price of crude goes down, the refinery has to sell what fuel they have in stock and they can't lose money or the stockholders will be upset. Have you ever seen a refinery "Tank Farm"? Now we're talking many millions of gallons that have to be sold without losing money. When the "Old" fuel is gone, then the price can be lowered. The same applies to local wholesalers and and gas stations.

Oversupply will affect the price as well from the refinery as they will run out of storage space and refineries take a while to shut down. They will lower the prices to sell product to make room for what is being produced currently. They can't dump it in a river - that's illegal and unethical.

The old saying is: Up like a rocket and down like a feather.

Hope that explains it some.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

Too Bad..

gasoline doesn't store well over time. I have an in ground storage tank and used to buy in bulk to fuel my 180 mile / day commute.

Now that I'm retired, I don't use enough to justify filling the tank to take advantage of the cheap gas. It would go bad before I could use it.

Went to Costco this morning...

...since they have early shopping for seniors. Pulled into the parking lot and found people wrapped around the parking lot. Decided that this wasn’t a good idea and decided to fill up with gas. Got it for $1.26 a gallon. Cheapest gas around. Pulled into a parking space to watch the proceedings and after 25 minutes, the line was as long as it was when I arrived. Crazy. I decided that it was time to go home. confused

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

.

maddog67 wrote:

...since they have early shopping for seniors. Pulled into the parking lot and found people wrapped around the parking lot. Decided that this wasn’t a good idea and decided to fill up with gas. Got it for $1.26 a gallon. Cheapest gas around. Pulled into a parking space to watch the proceedings and after 25 minutes, the line was as long as it was when I arrived. Crazy. I decided that it was time to go home. confused

It's been that way since the beginning of March. At this time I would stay away from crowd that size at any market or stores.

Not sure, but "going

Not sure, but "going somewhere" in your car is still social distancing. It is what you do when you get there that matters. For a gas trip, which is probably deemed "essential", driving 1 mile or 10 miles isn't a factor. But take lots of wipes as gas pumps are deemed one of the most "dirty" items you can touch.

unfortunately ...

metricman wrote:

~snip~

Have you ever seen a refinery "Tank Farm"?

~snip~

I've seen tank farms up close and personal. One part of my job is heavy construction for refineries, basically excavation for the tanks in those tank farms.

A while back we excavated a huge area at one refinery to build a rail yard to move the millions of gallons a day that were processed. A few years later they had an explosive accident that would cost more to fix than was worth it so they closed shop. Hard to imagine that cost knowing the rail yard cost them in the millions to build.

metricman wrote:

Hope that explains it some.

Unfortunately it explains it in a very logical manner. I, like many, want to holler greed at the station owners. surprised

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Prices are nice

But will I be able to use it before it goes bad?

Same At Walmart

maddog67 wrote:

...since they have early shopping for seniors. Pulled into the parking lot and found people wrapped around the parking lot. Decided that this wasn’t a good idea and decided to fill up with gas. Got it for $1.26 a gallon. Cheapest gas around. Pulled into a parking space to watch the proceedings and after 25 minutes, the line was as long as it was when I arrived. Crazy. I decided that it was time to go home. confused

We went to Walmart on Tuesday to try their 6 AM to 7 AM seniors only shopping hour. It was similar to your experience. The place had twice the number of shoppers than we encountered a few days earlier at mid day. They apparently didn't screen people as they entered since about half were under 65.

On the bright side, we managed to score some toilet paper though!

Maybe a leading indicator

bdhsfz6 wrote:

On the bright side, we managed to score some toilet paper though!

I made a shopping run today, first since last Saturday, and meant to last a while. I visited five stores (one Whole Foods, two Albertson's, Sam's club, and Trader Joes's).

-Still no flour (sigh)
-I saw toilet paper on the shelf at least three places. And not every second cart had bought some!!!

So maybe toilet paper will come back into availability before all garages are full.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Check restaurants for flour & supplies

Here in Boise some of our local restaurants have started selling basics like flour, sugar, even toilet paper. One of them recognized that they have different suppliers than the grocery stores. Here's the article. I imagine it's happening in other places.
https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/208/sunrise-cafe-shi...

Gas prices

I'm 76 and can remember the 50's gas war prices. 12 and 13 cents per gallon back then.
From all this inactivity, I think there will be a lot of dead batteries. Luckily I have a couple of jump starters that will alleviate that problem. AAA's going to be busy.

--
Under no circumstances whatsoever, will logic and common sense be tolerated.

Dead batteries? I don't

Dead batteries? I don't think so. We still have to go out to get food and grocery? So you start your car engine once a week. That ought to be enough to keep batteries charged.

If your battery is in good shape

rhl7943 wrote:

I'm 76 and can remember the 50's gas war prices. 12 and 13 cents per gallon back then.
From all this inactivity, I think there will be a lot of dead batteries. Luckily I have a couple of jump starters that will alleviate that problem. AAA's going to be busy.

If your battery is in top shape, it's not a problem. The U.S. Navy keeps lead-acid batteries in service for 20 years or more and that's because someone comes around periodically and checks the condition using a hydrometer and charges or adds distilled water if necessary. Also, new cars sit on dealer lots for months at a time without ever being started. I worked a a Chevy-Buick dealer for 5 years and never saw a new car being jump started. But I did see used cars getting jump started though.

I can remember cheap gas too. I remember 15¢ a gallon gas in the 50s and I bought High Test in Miami in 1965 for 25¢ a gallon due to a price war!

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

Gas Prices are still dropping

Gas where I live is down to $1.74 gal ($1.49 at Sam's & Costco 20 miles away - worth the drive for my 24 gallon tank). Lowest in VA today is 97¢ gal. And in WI it is down to 87¢ gal. (apparently the lowest in the US).

Prices are creeping down now, but the question is: When will they stop dropping?

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

a new industry

metricman wrote:
rhl7943 wrote:

I'm 76 and can remember the 50's gas war prices. 12 and 13 cents per gallon back then.
From all this inactivity, I think there will be a lot of dead batteries. Luckily I have a couple of jump starters that will alleviate that problem. AAA's going to be busy.

If your battery is in top shape, it's not a problem. The U.S. Navy keeps lead-acid batteries in service for 20 years or more and that's because someone comes around periodically and checks the condition using a hydrometer and charges or adds distilled water if necessary. Also, new cars sit on dealer lots for months at a time without ever being started. I worked a a Chevy-Buick dealer for 5 years and never saw a new car being jump started. But I did see used cars getting jump started though.

I can remember cheap gas too. I remember 15¢ a gallon gas in the 50s and I bought High Test in Miami in 1965 for 25¢ a gallon due to a price war!

was created (like the mysterious 3k mile oil change) where now the avg. household has a jump starter that fits in a pocket book and a battery tender in the garage. But as you point out, my garage queen has sat 7 mos. in the garage, normal lead acid not AGM nor marine or deep cycle, starts right up. Cant say I remember 25 cent gasoline but I do remember 76.9 cents in 1998.

Gas war in Oklahoma?

Chickasha is on I-44 between OKC and Lawton. Valero is $0.94, Shell is .99 and also at Walmart. Most stations in OKC are between .99 and 1.20 today.

--
"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Modern car high dollar/high

Modern car high dollar/high function radio/stereos are what kills car batteries. Especially with Onstar, Uconnect, and whatever Ford uses. They all have built in active cell phones that connect periodically, even when the vehicle is shut off.

Even if they don't have all that, the clock still draws a certain amount of current, and over time will pull down the battery. As well as that security system that you didn't know was built-in.

--
Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

The price in Rochester NY area is at about $2.35

.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

Be careful what you disconnect

phranc wrote:

Modern car high dollar/high function radio/stereos are what kills car batteries. Especially with Onstar, Uconnect, and whatever Ford uses. They all have built in active cell phones that connect periodically, even when the vehicle is shut off.

Even if they don't have all that, the clock still draws a certain amount of current, and over time will pull down the battery. As well as that security system that you didn't know was built-in.

The battery in my 2016 GMC went bad last year. I had lights and everything worked, except when you went to start it. Then everything went dead. Jump start worked fine. At the parts store they used a power supply connected to the diagnostic connector to prevent memory loss in the computers.

When I started the truck after the battery was installed, I found out that I had to reset a few things, such as the collision warning distance, the automatic H/L setting and the seat settings were lost also.

Not everything in your vehicle has non-volatile memory, so don't disconnect the battery or unplug things, or you may find that your personal settings may be lost. The devices that are always on are designed to use the least amount of current possible so the battery does not go dead.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

California gas price finally

California gas price finally drops below $3. Sadly that is great news for Californians who don't get to see $2.xx gas price for many years.

my

phranc wrote:

Modern car high dollar/high function radio/stereos are what kills car batteries. Especially with Onstar, Uconnect, and whatever Ford uses. They all have built in active cell phones that connect periodically, even when the vehicle is shut off.

Even if they don't have all that, the clock still draws a certain amount of current, and over time will pull down the battery. As well as that security system that you didn't know was built-in.

my garage queen has all that....as mentioned my record is 7 mos., but garaged. Some of the modern cars actually have 2 batteries now (luxury cars).

p.s. on the gas prices--Costco in PA, is LITERALLY cheaper than the Costco in NJ. Normally PA is at least 30 cents more.

you

metricman wrote:
phranc wrote:

Modern car high dollar/high function radio/stereos are what kills car batteries. Especially with Onstar, Uconnect, and whatever Ford uses. They all have built in active cell phones that connect periodically, even when the vehicle is shut off.

Even if they don't have all that, the clock still draws a certain amount of current, and over time will pull down the battery. As well as that security system that you didn't know was built-in.

The battery in my 2016 GMC went bad last year. I had lights and everything worked, except when you went to start it. Then everything went dead. Jump start worked fine. At the parts store they used a power supply connected to the diagnostic connector to prevent memory loss in the computers.

When I started the truck after the battery was installed, I found out that I had to reset a few things, such as the collision warning distance, the automatic H/L setting and the seat settings were lost also.

Not everything in your vehicle has non-volatile memory, so don't disconnect the battery or unplug things, or you may find that your personal settings may be lost. The devices that are always on are designed to use the least amount of current possible so the battery does not go dead.

probably would not have noticed, but if you took your car to get its emissions tested, it would have not been in a ready state. My wife has a GM SUV and I had to replace the brake pedal position sensor (it was $6 on amazon and turns on the ABS / service stabilitrak warnings). since I don't own a GM tool to recalibrate, I unplugged the battery. It took over 800 miles for the EVAP to go into I/M ready. And she had her inspection so I said nothing. So apparently you can have 1 category not ready at least per the web (this is to prevent someone from simply resetting the service engine soon at the inspection)

Short

metricman wrote:
phranc wrote:

Modern car high dollar/high function radio/stereos are what kills car batteries. Especially with Onstar, Uconnect, and whatever Ford uses. They all have built in active cell phones that connect periodically, even when the vehicle is shut off.

Even if they don't have all that, the clock still draws a certain amount of current, and over time will pull down the battery. As well as that security system that you didn't know was built-in.

The battery in my 2016 GMC went bad last year. I had lights and everything worked, except when you went to start it. Then everything went dead. Jump start worked fine. At the parts store they used a power supply connected to the diagnostic connector to prevent memory loss in the computers.

When I started the truck after the battery was installed, I found out that I had to reset a few things, such as the collision warning distance, the automatic H/L setting and the seat settings were lost also.

Not everything in your vehicle has non-volatile memory, so don't disconnect the battery or unplug things, or you may find that your personal settings may be lost. The devices that are always on are designed to use the least amount of current possible so the battery does not go dead.

Sounds as if your battery had a dead or shorted cell. It only shows up when the current load increases, such as under the load of the starter.

My new Cherokee has that engine stop technology that stops the engine at stop lights. I wonder which will go first, the battery or the starter?

--
Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

drained when turned off, and batteries not young

Despite the success of the US Navy in keeping Lead-acid batteries going for many years with tender loving care, I think the original suggestion that current conditions might find a lot of owners with non-starting cars was on the mark.

Consider just two things:
1. Many (most?) owners run their batteries until they are at the point of failure (typically noticed by much slower engine turning speed at startup).
2. Many (nearly all?) modern cars have an appreciable standby current drain from the 12V battery when they are sitting still and "off", unless a rare owner disconnects the battery physically.

I'll speculate that typical US owners get five years out of a battery, in which case point 1 suggests that at least 5% of owners are within a very few months of battery failure, even when used on the regular pattern.

I don't know the range of typical "off drains", but two data points I do have are for my 2002 Audi A4, which drains about 25 mA, and my deceased Aunt's late-oughts Lexus, which drained enough to discharge the very large OEM almost new replacement battery down to 4V in just a couple of months.

I suspect a lot of cars are getting more than a week off in the current crisis, which are normally driven at least every other day. In some two-car households, the car not chosen for grocery runs may easily go over a month.

Lastly, I bring a little GPS point into this post. In 2009 I left with my family on a cruise around South America, and by chance took the Prius to the airport rather than the Audi. It was a good thing, as the Audi battery was too low to start when we got back a bit under three weeks later.

The main culprit was not a nearly expired battery, nor the 25 mA Audi "off current, but rather the 110 mA "off current" of my Garmin Nuvi 855. This specific Garmin design was unusual in several respects. The one that nearly had me seeking a battery jump in the airport parking lot was that when you turned it "off" nothing much really stopped consuming power except for the display and backlight. I was in the habit of leaving it plugged in all the time, but hitting the button turning it "off" when I left the car, and my car was not one that disconnected the accessory socket under any condition.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

.

johnnatash4 wrote:

~snip~

p.s. on the gas prices--Costco in PA, is LITERALLY cheaper than the Costco in NJ. Normally PA is at least 30 cents more.

NJ used be at least 30 cents cheaper, average price, not at discount places like Costco. New Jersey increased the gas tax by 23-cents per gallon around 2016 and while it is still cheaper than PA, who has the highest gas tax in the country, it is now only 10 to 15 cents cheaper normally, at least in the Phila/central-south Jersey area.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

I

soberbyker wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

~snip~

p.s. on the gas prices--Costco in PA, is LITERALLY cheaper than the Costco in NJ. Normally PA is at least 30 cents more.

NJ used be at least 30 cents cheaper, average price, not at discount places like Costco. New Jersey increased the gas tax by 23-cents per gallon around 2016 and while it is still cheaper than PA, who has the highest gas tax in the country, it is now only 10 to 15 cents cheaper normally, at least in the Phila/central-south Jersey area.

Bought gas in Mt Laurel NJ as late as January, and it was over 30 cents less than Costco in Glen Mills, PA.

Today, 4/10/20, Glen Mills, PA, is literally cheaper.

In Edison, NJ, Costco is 7 cents less on regular, and 26 cents less for premium, today, 4/10/20, v. Glen Mills PA.

It's south NJ that always has monkey business. Like Admiral Wilson being almost the same as PA all year.

What are the prices, that always helps:

Mt Laurel NJ $1.979 $2.389

Glen Mills PA $1.959 2.359

Edison NJ $1.889 $2.099

Wilmington DE $1.659 $1.859

It's Mt. Laurel NJ, south Jersey, that's out of whack

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