Phone companies can now block robocalls automatically

 

A start in the right direction but a mandate will likely be needed to the phone companies.

http://www.fox4news.com/trending/phone-companies-can-now-blo...

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Nuvi 2460LMT
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sure it is

From the article Quote:
"Verizon said it will "evolve" its free call-blocking tool for wireless customers and be able to provide spam alerts and blocking more broadly,"

The current free tool now lets you manually block any call so it does not ring the next time. BUT it will still allow the call to leave as many voice mails as they want. Also does not block text from a number you've blocked. So it's only a minimal tool now, and I bet they will "evolve" it so they can charge for you to use it.

Another law (whatever) with no teeth in it. The phone companies won't do anything for free!

And the non-sucesss of the "Do not call" list of a few years ago is a another example of telemarketers getting around a blockade.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

Great idea

I have Republic Wireless for my cell phone. Several months ago they allowed people to opt-in. My spam calls dropped considerably. The amount of spam calls I get now are few and far between.

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Garmin Nuvi 2450

all about the money

the phone company sells block's of numbers used by tele marker's for advertisement and sells the customer anti add programs they got you coming and going. I get phone calls from my own phone number about how im going to jail for S.S fraud or local numbers about my computer that aren't local there from another country. because of so much pressure to do something the phone co decides to put out a weak anti add program for free ! caller id is a ripoff because it doesn't reveal the real number that's calling you from another country, the phone co will lose money if they stopped advertisers from calling you !

Norton had

Norton had a phone block. When I answered a call and hung up quickly it asked me if I wanted to block it. When I said yes I would never get another call from that number.
Well, good things never last. Norton and Google have some problem with the blocking and are "working" on bring it back.
I use prepaid AT&T phone and they won't let me use their phone block unless I go post paid. Bummer all the way around.

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Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

"Should I Answer"

I use a free app called "Should I Answer" on my prepaid TracFone service. It is driven off of a crowd sourced data base and does a reasonably good job of blocking unwanted calls. You can add numbers, either to the public data base or for your own private use.

The main problem I have is with the scammers (both robocall and live scams) that use spoofed numbers on the caller ID. They change the number with every call, often using local numbers. Since phone blocker apps use caller ID to determine what to block, they are totally ineffective at blocking these spoofed numbers. if the phone company blocks these in the network rather than at your local device, maybe they will be able to detect and block spoofed numbers.

Many of my robocalls are "legitimate" from political campaigns, charities, etc. Has anyone heard whether or not the phone company initiated blocking will include these types of calls?

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Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

.

Android allows you to block numbers as spam from the phone app, or text app. They can still leave a message, but the phone doesn't ring.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

don't expect perfection

Spam detection on my Gmail account is definitely not perfect. They occasionally put things I want and need to see in my spam bucket, and occasionally seemingly obvious spam winds up in my inbox.

Bear in mind that Gmail has vastly more information about incoming mail (specifically including its entire content) than will ever be available to people trying to block phone calls.

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personal GPS user since 1992

Another way

Is to download a sit-tone.wav or .MP3 file

In telephony, a special information tone (SIT) is an in-band international standard Call-Progress Tone consisting of three rising tones indicating a call has failed. It usually precedes a recorded announcement describing the problem.

The Special Information Tone (SIT) for vacant or blank numbers can and does stop robo-callers. SIT tones are three precise, sequential tones which are used by telephone companies to convey information about the condition of the phone line. The most commonly used SIT tone is the vacant number intercept SIT, that boo-eee-ooo sound you get when a number is no longer in service.

Download this file here, it's on the first line of the article:
http://yourhomenow.com/sit.html

Record it and then add it "Ahead" of your voicemail message.

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

You can

You can, but all your friends and other contacts will HATE you.
I did that on a previous service that did not have any call blocking and finally removed it because it was annoying for my incoming callers who I wanted to leave voice messages, some refused and I don't blame them.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

The Best Approach I've found ...

Is to simply let all calls go to voice mail regardless of what the caller ID shows. This weeds out most robo calls. Listen to the incoming message. If you recognize the call as being legitimate, pick up while the message is being recorded or immediately call the person back.

Many legitimate callers prefer not to leave a message and will try calling again later. Therefore, it's a good idea to let friends and relatives know you are letting your answering machine screen all your calls. You can even add a message to that effect in your answering machine greeting.

This doesn't stop the phone from ringing but it does save time by not having to deal with every incoming call.

Yes, that's a good

Yes, that's a good approach.
I only pick up a call if it is in my contact list. I add all calls from good sources as I need.

That got my wife once, when she locked her purse, keys and phone in the trunk of the car. She called from a strangers phone and had to leave voice mail expaining where she was and to bring spare keys. She was not happy, but heck, it WAS her fault for being careless.....

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

dont

the callers constantly change their numbers? It has to have been at least 10 years now, where I can go to the web, enter a caller ID number (such as your wife or mom), can call you, but connect you to anybody I want, such as your ex wife. You do the wth is going on, your mom and ex wife think you are nuts, and it was all done innocently online. How does anything get blocked in such a scenario? At the same time, in the big picture, it's a small problem. Of course unless one falls for the IRS or apple support calls.

Yeah the bad guys just spoof

Yeah the bad guys just spoof a good legit number. Now if it was like in Asia (Japan) where only the initiator of the phone call is charged for placing calls, we would see a decrease.

What I don't understand

I get a call that said it is from my health care provider and when I answer it said something about my credit card.

Do these spoofed callers actually think that someone who thinks they are answering their health care will give out information when asked about their credit card and not their health care?

I would think people that answer and see it isn't their health care will hang up.

Why do they keep spoofing the incorrect number as when you answer you know it is not who they say it it???

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Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

These work for the crooks

mgarledge wrote:

I get a call that said it is from my health care provider and when I answer it said something about my credit card.
Do these spoofed callers actually think that someone who thinks they are answering their health care will give out information when asked about their credit card and not their health care?
I would think people that answer and see it isn't their health care will hang up.
Why do they keep spoofing the incorrect number as when you answer you know it is not who they say it it???

Because there are many people out in this world who are not savvy enough to understand that there are many crooks using various schemes to try and separate you from your money!!!

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

business as usual

Don't be fooled. It's just public stunt, as those marketing calls are getting out of hands. As well as scams over the phone. So because of bad publicity phone companies are using old smoke and mirrors tactics. I guess they just block calls form party, that will not register with company and allow those registered to keep going. Of course registration will usually be associated with some administration fee. smile

What?

Whatever happened to the "Do Not Call" registry?

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Do Not Call" registry?

Another dumb gov. program that doesn't work very good.

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

Hopefully It Has an Impact

We'll see what happens. Hopefully, this will have an impact for awhile. They'll eventually figure out a way around it.

What?

Looks like the telecom companies figured out that people stopped answering their phones and let all calls go to voicemail. Can't sell airtime minutes when people refuse to answer the calls.

And then there are all the phone numbers that are being blocked. The robocallers spoof valid phone numbers and those numbers end up getting blocked.

This had a potential big and bad impact on the phone companies, so they had to do something.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

No Doubt Phone Companies will Charge

No matter what the solution, the phone companies will charge for blocking numbers. For Android users there are several free programs available that will identify, block and scrutinize calls for the receiver. Many of these same programs are available for Apple users at a price. The sad thing is that many of these crooks are preying on people, especially the elderly, and stealing from them. In today's world you have to constantly be on the lookout for the next scam artist because they are everywhere.

Different Area Code

When I first signed up for my current phone service, I was mistakenly issued a phone number with an area code from another part of the state. At first I didn't like it, but now any time I see a call from that area code, I ignore it because I don't know anyone in that part of the state. This solves the robo-caller's number spoofing trick where they try to make it look like a local caller.

Home vs Mobile

I NEVER give my mobile number out unless trusted friend or my doctors. I apparently did once, and I get a rare Robo call mainly from Maritz in STL. With iPhone I instantly block.

I do get a LOT of Robo calls on the home phone. We seldom pick up on unknown calls, but have a Digitone Plus Call Blocker. Easy to use, but does not have an infinite number of call block ability, so about once a year, you have to dump and start over. Still better than doing nothing.

BTW, when I have to give a number, it is the land line, not the mobile.

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rvOutrider

 

Melaqueman wrote:
mgarledge wrote:

I get a call that said it is from my health care provider and when I answer it said something about my credit card.
Do these spoofed callers actually think that someone who thinks they are answering their health care will give out information when asked about their credit card and not their health care?
I would think people that answer and see it isn't their health care will hang up.
Why do they keep spoofing the incorrect number as when you answer you know it is not who they say it it???

Because there are many people out in this world who are not savvy enough to understand that there are many crooks using various schemes to try and separate you from your money!!!

It will probably go on forever.

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Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

So ironic..

It's so ironic how they can now block them, as they were know to sell customer info to 3rd parties.

Wow, right!

allbizz wrote:

It's so ironic how they can now block them, as they were know to sell customer info to 3rd parties.

Isn't that double dipping?

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Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

Verizon cell phone customers...

Verizon cell phone customers, if you haven't already, download and try Verizon's "Call Filter" smartphone app. I believe it uses the "Shaken/Stir" (also labeled as Stir/Shaken) technology to identify spoofed calls, which for now, is working pretty well. (No doubt eventually the bad guys will figure out a workaround, just like they did in coming up with spoofing technology and working overseas to get around the Do Not Call list.)

The Verizon Call Filter app can be run for free. Additional features within the app such as being able to report a number as spam (big deal) are unlocked at $3 a month if you agree to subscribe. Don't worry, it's very clear if you read each screen when you're being invited to subscribe for a monthly fee and just avoid doing that if you want.

Anyway even the free part of the app, available in its current format since last April or so, has done a great job for me in cutting way down on spam robocalls. I set "Spam filter on > Auto-blocking all spam calls." They can leave voicemail if they choose, and most don't, and in most cases with these calls, my phone doesn't even ring. (Sometimes it will ring but say "Suspected spam.") Verizon is not bugging me to upgrade their Call Filter app to subscription status. And it's not caused any other problems I'm aware of like filtering out calls I want. So try the free part of the Call Filter app, if you use Verizon, and see if it doesn't also help you *a lot*.

I also am fortunate enough to have kept an out-of-state area code on my cell phone after moving and this enables me to identify the callers spoofing my old neighbors and just ignore those calls. Businesses dependent on answering local callers are less lucky--they can't afford to let every call go to voicemail.

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"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

all my phone numbers are

all my phone numbers are Google Voice.
except the 2 for the cell phones, which the GV numbers forward to, so I don't use those number. most scam comes in on the GV number and I take pleasure in blocking them. But mostly I just ignore strange numbers. If they really want me they can leave a message. The only message I get is because of the SS fraud and jail time I am getting.
Oh Dear................

scams

on my land line I have caller id and I get a call from my wife's cell phone talk about spoofing how did they get her number to call me with ive also had local numbers call with people that had bad accents and computer created voices , S.S called me and said im going to jail for fraud fine I need a vacation LOL

Nomorobo

Another tool - free for VOIP (monthly fee for mobiles)

https://www.nomorobo.com/

Seems to be working well. Copper POTS was discontinued in my neighborhood, so had to go to VOIP with Verizon. This drastically cut down the robocalls.

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GO

any number, any ID

geo334 wrote:

how did they get her number to call me

With the correct inputs to the system, the call originator can cause any phone number and any caller ID text they wish to be transmitted to your telephone line as caller ID information (within the length and character set limits).

Spoofing is a good name for this practice.

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personal GPS user since 1992

Calling myself

archae86 wrote:
geo334 wrote:

how did they get her number to call me

With the correct inputs to the system, the call originator can cause any phone number and any caller ID text they wish to be transmitted to your telephone line as caller ID information (within the length and character set limits).

Spoofing is a good name for this practice.

Yep. No matter how many number I block I still get the same calls over and over. Lately we've been getting a lot of calls where the Caller ID shows MY name. I hate these people.

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GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

Those scammers aren't too bright!

thrak wrote:
archae86 wrote:

Yep. No matter how many number I block I still get the same calls over and over. Lately we've been getting a lot of calls where the Caller ID shows MY name. I hate these people.

What I find really odd (stupid actually) is the scammer making the phone call (to you) show your own name and your own number...as if you could (or would) really call your (yourself) own phone number using your own phone. Why would a scammer think that would work - causing someone to answer their phone? That may work one time to get you to answer such a phone call, but after that you know such a phone call that IDs from your own phone number with your own name is a scam. Those scammers aren't too bright!

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Politicians and Diapers must be changed often for the exact same reason...

Today

Today "Microsoft" starting spoofing my home number.
They called 3 times in a 30 minute time. I answered the 1st one as my husband was walking on his treadmill in his barn and if he needs me he calls our number and hang up and waits for me to answer.
After the third call he was back in the house so I blocked our own number. My phones have a call block on them that let's blocks totally. We receive one ring and then they are block and can not even leave voice mail.
As I was typing this they called again and I had one ring and it went to block. So it is working, yea.
I tested and we can still use the hangups method to call our own number.
So now because of this problem I have had to block my own number.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

nomorobo

gordyo wrote:

Another tool - free for VOIP (monthly fee for mobiles)

https://www.nomorobo.com/

Seems to be working well. Copper POTS was discontinued in my neighborhood, so had to go to VOIP with Verizon. This drastically cut down the robocalls.

Nomorobo works well for me. The landline service is free and the mobile app is $19.99 per year.

dobs108 smile

Just like Identity theft, it's Momey, money, money

Just like if somebody opens a CC Act. in your name, its your obb to prove it's not you at your expense. Why? Because CC companies have big money Campaign donations, why pass laws that anger them?
It would be easy to stop Robo calls and get the fraudsters, but why, there's big money to be made from supplying the service and it would cost to stop it and go after BG's. Think about it, just a simple idea, you register on Web site, you have to email verify. Well have phone companies block all calls from unverified numbers.
Many Robo's are from overseas exchanges, make those Countries go after Robo's or get their exchanges blocked. I did this with Area Code 202 (DC) getting 10+ Robo's a week for Pol donations, blocked 202 and cut robo's by 80%.
Servers can ID high Vol users, check them out, make hefty fine and Prison sentence laws, confiscate equiptment!

 

mmullins98 wrote:

A start in the right direction but a mandate will likely be needed to the phone companies.

http://www.fox4news.com/trending/phone-companies-can-now-block-robocalls-automatically

Not sure a mandate will be needed, as phone companies have an incentive to make their product not annoy their customers, so their customers use them more and stop ignoring all calls.

BUT - Allowing the phone companies to automatically block calls is at the POLICY end. The phone companies still need to acquire/integrate/implement equipment and processes to do this. But now the regulatory hurdle has been cleared for them to get started.

FTC announces major crackdown on robocalls

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Nuvi 2460LMT

i

I love the one where someone calls you on your cell, and the caller ID is yourself. Hmmm, should I pick it up?

Or how about the ones where the telemarketer is in a foreign language that matched on your family's ancestry?

I've eliminated 100% of these calls with an IVR

My company provides VoIP services to business customers so we have the infrastructure to do this... but the best way I've found is to have an IVR that says something like "Hi, you've reached blah blah blah... press 4 if you'd like to reach us". The number could be random but I haven't bothered to do this, a static number works just fine for now but if this method became popular, they would likely evolve to include some voice-recognition that listens for a digit. In that case, I'm guessing that a Captcha-style puzzle for them to solve, like, "add five and two together and dial the answer as a single-digit" would work pretty well.

This has eliminated 100% (yes, you read correctly - ONE HUNDRED PERCENT) of automated spam callers to our home line, as they can't identify and transmit the proper digit in an automated fashion. Now, instead of ringing 7 or more times per day, it doesn't ring at all, unless it's a legitimate, or the very rare manual sales, caller. We've only gotten one of those calls and I was wondering how they got through but then realized that it was someone manually cold-calling.

Interestingly though, you do not want to use "1" as the digit to press, as a very small number of automated callers will send a DTMF "1" to try and get through business IVRs. So, the best policy is to have option 1 go to a recording with directions, business hours, etc.

So on our home line, option 1 goes to Lenny:
https://www.reddit.com/r/itslenny/

Lenny is an amusing way to deal with these callers, and you can use it if you have the ability to transfer or conference in another number (3-Way Calling).

The SIT or Special Information Tone method mentioned in an earlier post is how the old Telezapper worked, but a spam/scam caller can defeat this by checking answer supervision for the call. If the phone is answered and then the tone plays, it's a Telezapper type of countermeasure and can be ignored. If the tone is heard as "early media" however, before the line is answered, then the SIT sequence is "legit". Unfortunately there's no real way to simply do this on your home phone line, you need to have control over the phone switch/PBX.

No, we're not providing service to residential customers at this time for a number of reasons but perhaps we should!

- Phil

Funny, I was thinking about this today

We use a Digitone now, Blocks some Auto, others can be blocked individual or even whole Area Codes. We blocked 202 because the only one in 202 worth talking too is President Trump, the rest are just Politicians wanting money now. Blocking 202 cut out about 20 calls a week or more sometimes. I put a message "State business or get Blocked" and set to answer on 2 rings, noticed that most hang up before message finishes? I think these are sometimes live call, but mostly Robo's that recognize the answer machine. I am going to give Digitone a call and see if they can add a no ring feature till message if finished. This will eat up Robo Time and most will hang up before set Ring Time starts.

"Hello it's Lenny"

Anyone wanting to hear how Lenny works in practice with actual telemarketers can check out "Hello it's Lenny" on YouTube. Some of the recordings with telemarketers trying very hard to be patient but ultimately not succeeding it are very funny. Of course if everybody had "Hello it's Lenny" on their phones, telemarketers would be trained to hang up as soon as they heard that voice.

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"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

Listening To "Hello it's Lenny"

Lost Anyway wrote:

Anyone wanting to hear how Lenny works in practice with actual telemarketers can check out "Hello it's Lenny" on YouTube. Some of the recordings with telemarketers trying very hard to be patient but ultimately not succeeding it are very funny. Of course if everybody had "Hello it's Lenny" on their phones, telemarketers would be trained to hang up as soon as they heard that voice.

"Hello it's Lenny" is worth listening to just for the entertainment value, IMO.

- Tom -

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XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

calls

who makes money from phone calls "the phone company" who losses the most money if they stop robo calls "the phone company" people complain about robo calls so "the phone company" creates weak programs that doesn't really work well to sell to you ! the phone is just like TV they make a lot of money from add's

May take some time

But definitely a step in the right direction

Small steps and always behind

Yes, you may say it's step in right direction. But it always be small step and just slightly behind problem. There is to much profit involved, for spammers and phone companies as well, that it will never stop. You will have solutions that are "almost 100%" bulletproof, but nobody is interested in really eliminating this sort of problem.

As for where they can get your phone number, as some asks. Everywhere. Even government agencies where caught selling, buying or "leaking" phone numbers and even more sensitive data. And if this data is in the open it's fair game for spammers.

Even companies you will not expect to be into business of data selling are doing this:

https://www.fastcompany.com/90310803/here-are-the-data-broke...

Interesting article

Very interesting article on privacy. I've noticed that a lot of companies want to know things they don't need to know, like your income and education level, even when they're not providing credit, etc. Like a life insurance policy that I've had for years and years... suddenly they want an "update" with that and other information, presumably so they can sell it.

As for the automated spam callers, making them dial a specific digit to reach you "If you'd like to reach us, press X", works 100% of the time.

- Phil

grzesja wrote:

Yes, you may say it's step in right direction. But it always be small step and just slightly behind problem. There is to much profit involved, for spammers and phone companies as well, that it will never stop. You will have solutions that are "almost 100%" bulletproof, but nobody is interested in really eliminating this sort of problem.

As for where they can get your phone number, as some asks. Everywhere. Even government agencies where caught selling, buying or "leaking" phone numbers and even more sensitive data. And if this data is in the open it's fair game for spammers.

Even companies you will not expect to be into business of data selling are doing this:

https://www.fastcompany.com/90310803/here-are-the-data-brokers-quietly-buying-and-selling-your-personal-information

I Just installed Verizon's File Filter

So far I haven't gotten any spam calls.

I Just installed Verizon's File Filter

So far I haven't gotten any spam calls.

I Just installed Verizon's File Filter

So far I haven't gotten any spam calls.

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