completaly formatted,fat 32,nuvi 1390t's internal memory

 

goodmorning,i'm intelligent:i formatted completaly my garmin,i resolved the wrong format by using garminsecurity3,but now i miss the operating system.i try to find the installer,or something like it,but it s quite difficult...and i didn t back up my device....so,if someone can help me,thanks really a lot,i hope
have a nice day

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Comprehensive Help

If Garmin WebUpdater does not properly detect your device and download the correct firmware version, you can get the firmware directly by right-clicking on the links below and saving. These links are the latest firmware version for the 1390. More than likely, your device uses the top one. However, some units do require the second link, so it's provided for convenience.

13xx/14xx Firmware

or

[MTK] 13xx/14xx Firmware

The missing voices, help files, vehicle icons, basemap, and time zone map can be downloaded through the following link, but you should be using Garmin WebUpdater at this point to get most of the files:

1300 Supplementary Files

Detail maps you will have to get from Garmin. A free map can be downloaded at http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

.

Here's a similar thread from a few days ago that might help.

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/43300

Wow

bontex wrote:

goodmorning,i'm intelligent:i formatted completaly my garmin,i resolved the wrong format by using garminsecurity3,but now i miss the operating system.i try to find the installer,or something like it,but it s quite difficult...and i didn t back up my device....so,if someone can help me,thanks really a lot,i hope
have a nice day

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

deep respect

i found people really rapid and precisous about my need:really thanks....i ll try immediatlay your solutions

not detected

i downloaded the first firmware,and system folder:the first was simple to flash,the second i copied as an portable program,but it didn t work.maybe there is an installation way that i don t know.i tryed to update by webupdater and the relative garmin s program...but not detected.....so sorry for the continuing annoyment,i wait for the third episode,really thanks in advance.
have a nice evening

ps i copied the folder

ps
i copied the folder system into the internal garmin s memory.sorry for the unprecisuos detail,
thanks

for now it works

i checked the GarminCure3 s set up:it s on cure options....ok i m intelligent.now i try to download alll,and after i try the maps.....thanks for your help
have a nice afternoon

Hmmmm

Ok, maybe the moderators should establish a new forum for all of these first time posters who "somehow" format their formerly "locked" GPS's.

There could be a sticky:

1. Buy or somehow otherwise acquire a locked GPS.

2. Format the GPS ... issuing the command "format my locked GPS>"

3. Find Garmin maps on one of the less-than-above-board bandit sites.

4. Find out the operating system is missing.

5. Attempt to find some helpful soul who can point you to an operating system download.

6. Still find out it's more difficult to restore a locked GPS after formating it.

I know, I know, I'm assuming facts-not-in-evidence.

But for the life of me, I don't know why we are getting more and more of these "I've accidently formatted my GPS" posts from first-time-posters who rarely, if ever, after finding help on POI Factory stick around to be productive members of the website.

I think (and this is only my opinion) the "stock" reply to those who somehow manage to format their GPS's should be "CONTACT GARMIN. If you are a REGISTERED OWNER of the GPS, they will help you."

In case someone is interested in acquiring a LOCKED GPS, there are currently three LOCKED garmin GPS's for sale on eBAY ... for sale by owner who say they have "forgotten" their passwords.

Yeah, right.

--
Garmin 205, 260W, 1450LMT, 2460LMT, HEREwego for iPhone ... all still mapping strong.

as far as i know the

as far as i know the operating system is in a protected
area and cannot be accessed by normal means
just restart your gps and it should function just fine
you only have to put voices, help files, vehicle icons, basemap, and time zone manually.
i have done this a few times and never had a problem
and as a bonus your gps will work with any usb car charger without going to download mode
i hope that this will help

More Detail, please

biggpsuser wrote:

as far as i know the operating system is in a protected
area and cannot be accessed by normal means
just restart your gps and it should function just fine
you only have to put voices, help files, vehicle icons, basemap, and time zone manually.
i have done this a few times and never had a problem
and as a bonus your gps will work with any usb car charger without going to download mode
i hope that this will help

Are you saying that you have "formatted" your device (as claimed by some who are trying to deal with a locked device) and it will fire up?

@cbwatts

*looks at cbwatts post, shakes my head, and walks away before the dead horse is beaten some more*

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

not a locked device just a

not a locked device
just a normal one

@biggpsuser

biggpsuser wrote:

not a locked device
just a normal one

I realize that your device was a normal one and my question is still did it fire up after being formatted?

Hidden OS Partition

I'm not the OP, but if I understand things correctly the firmware is stored in a hidden partition of the flash memory that is not accessible to the user. Obviously, without experimentation I cannot be positive, but I believe the GCD file is a container format, like ZIP and RAR archives. When a GCD file is loaded and the device restarted, the low-level firmware kicks in, opens up the GCD file, and sends all the firmware files within the GCD file to their proper locations in the hidden partition.

It stands to reason that the device would in fact boot. However, without the maps or other files, it's pretty much useless.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

My thoughts

In the past I also thought that the firmware (“operating system”) was on a hidden partition on the drive that is seen when in “PC mode”.

But recently I took upprof’s 255W apart and saw these four main chips on the logic board:

“SanDisk” which no doubt is simply an SD “card” and is probably what is seen as a drive when the 255W is connected to a computer.

“ARM” which I believe is a microprocessor chip which includes the “ROM” (Read Only Memory) that is checked in diagnostic mode.

“K4X56163PL” which is similar to markings I have seen on Samsung memory chips so I think it is the “RAM” that is checked in diagnostic mode.

“G150” which I think is the GPS receiver.

I believe that the “ARM” chip is somewhat similar to the ARM based microcontroller chip that is on the Arduino that I have been writing firmware for, which has ROM (EEPROM) built into it.

So I think that the Garmin firmware is stored on the ARM chip rather than on the “drive” that the maps and other data are stored. That is why the firmware is not affected by formatting the drive.

The firmware can be written to the ARM chip’s EEPROM by the GCD file method and also by using an .RGN file along with the Garmin Updater.exe file.

I have used software that captured an image of everything on an unused 255W drive down to the bit level and would include any hidden sectors. When I copied that image to upprof’s 255W it did not change the firmware version (his had been updated to a much later version).

BTW I locked my 255W, formatted it, and when it booted up, it still asked for the PIN.

Then I then copied the full image of a different unused 255W drive to my 255W and again the PIN was asked for.

And for good measure, I used an rgn file that I created before locking my 255W and rewrote the firmware. The PIN was still required.

So the lock cannot be bypassed by formatting the drive, by copying an image of an unlocked same model Garmin, or by rewriting the firmware.

View of the three chips on front of upprof's 255W logic board:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v469/evstringer/POIFactory...

View of the G150 GPS receiver on the backside of the logic board:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v469/evstringer/POIFactory...

Evert

Very informative. My head is spinning after reading this.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Interesting

But nevertheless I got lost after:

“G150” which I think is the GPS receiver.

--
Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

Good detective work

As always Evert, good dectective work! It makes sense that Garmin would protect the PIN locking code from reformat and/or reinstall of the firmware ... it must be part of the "bootstrap" code that the user can't get to.

--
Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

alandb wrote: As always

alandb wrote:

As always Evert, good dectective work! It makes sense that Garmin would protect the PIN locking code from reformat and/or reinstall of the firmware ... it must be part of the "bootstrap" code that the user can't get to.

Thank you for the kind words alandb.

I think the PIN is stored in EEPROM but the firmware has the instructions to check to see if there is a number stored and if so, stop the show until the the PIN is entered by the user.

So theoretically a person with considerable programming skill could reverse engineer the firmware and put in a series of NOPs, or a jump instruction, to eliminate the checking for a PIN.

That probably would be way beyond the abilties of any kiddie chat room "hackers" that may have tried formatting drives, and reinstalling firmware to bypass the PIN. And of course Garmin would come down hard on anyone posting details of how to do it.

GCD and RGN files

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

....... but I believe the GCD file is a container format, like ZIP and RAR archives. When a GCD file is loaded and the device restarted, the low-level firmware kicks in, opens up the GCD file, and sends all the firmware files within the GCD file to their proper locations in the hidden partition.
.......

I think the GCD file (and RGN files derived from GCD files) directly contain the actual machine code that is copied byte for byte to the EEPROM - i.e. they are not in a ZIP or RAR type compressed form.

(The firmware probably was written in C++ and an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) that is "aware" of the particular ARM instruction set was used to create the machine level code.)

One can open the files using a Hex editor or even a simple text editor such as notepad and see what is inside. A lot of it will look like gibberish because the machine code has bytes that have no associated text characters, or have meaningless associated text characters.

But some of the text that is stored along with the firmware can be seen such as these:

"GCD file missing" and "SM_event_callback: SM_PIN_CODE_REQUEST_NTF"

BTW Words such as "gcd s/w ver=%d%s State = Disc Updt Software Update Needed" found in the GCD/RGN file leads me to think that it is the firmware itself that checks to see if an update is available and initiates the update.

yes no problem at all

yes no problem at all

Great report!

EVERT>BTW I locked my 255W, formatted it, and when it booted up, it still asked for the PIN.

Then I then copied the full image of a different unused 255W drive to my 255W and again the PIN was asked for.

And for good measure, I used an rgn file that I created before locking my 255W and rewrote the firmware. The PIN was still required.

So the lock cannot be bypassed by formatting the drive, by copying an image of an unlocked same model Garmin, or by rewriting the firmware.

-----------

Boy Evert, that is great news! And it also explains why new posters who somehow have formatted their GPS ... usually only post a couple of times and then disappear from the website.

Even if they can put all the parts together, in the end, the GPS still requires input of a PIN.

Thanks!

--
Garmin 205, 260W, 1450LMT, 2460LMT, HEREwego for iPhone ... all still mapping strong.

Recovery from Formatting

An interesting thing about formatting a GPS device is that it is basically like deleting all the files. However, there is little likelihood that the deleted files have been overwritten as might be the case when trying to "undelete" a file on your computer.

What this means is that software like Recuva can be used to recover the files. Recuva's deep scan will find all of the files and enable you to restore them to, say, a folder on your PC. The problem with Recuva is that it does not do a good job of recovering the "directory tree" even though there is an "Option" to recover folders. This means that files that are in different folders that have the same name (but maybe different contents) become problematic. You can get all the files.

Another recovery option is to use "Data Recover" software. Here is a link to a review of several packages.

http://data-recovery-software-review.toptenreviews.com/

One of these packages (#10) is from EaseUS. However, it turns out that EaseUS has a free version that will restore one gig of the data. Fortunately, it is one gig at a time so that multiple runs of the software will recover the data (except for the main map which itself exceeds one gig). However, Recuva should get that back for you.

The free version from EaseUS can be found at
http://www.easeus.com/datarecoverywizard/free-data-recovery-...

I played around with the software in multiple passes and was able to get all the data back from a thumb drive that I purposely formatted.

@Evert

Since you have been playing around with an actual device, would you test EaseUS Data Recovery Free and see if will recover - in several steps - the 255W you have been playing with?

Thanks

John

paranoid fear

Evert wrote:

And of course Garmin would come down hard on anyone posting details of how to do it.

cbwatts wrote:

Even if they can put all the parts together, in the end, the GPS still requires input of a PIN.

Evert, I very much doubt that Garmin would. They even seem to have given up on the foolish PIN approach in the more recent GPS receivers. And they never put forth any effort as far as I know to prevent a brute force attack, they could have easily locked the receiver for X minutes after a number of failed attempts to guess the pin but they seemed to not care enough. And I'm not sure how they could come down on me if I bothered to come up with a fix and distribute it. I don't think that such a fix would fall within the prevue of the draconian DCMA, and I sure didn't agree to anything that would prevent me from doing so when I bought the GPS receiver. There might actually be a legitimate owner out there who locked their GPS, didn't use it for a while, and has now forgotten their pin (or, another legitimate example, an owner has died and now the next of kin want access to the GPS they inherited).

PINS simply don't stop GPS receivers from being stolen (or car windows from being broken), at best they might prevent or delay a thief's effort to use or sell the device, but by then the window is broken and the GPS receiver is gone. Worst case might be that the cops later catch the crook with a number of stolen GPS receivers and (in a fairy tale world) try to return them, but your has been smashed by a frustrated crook.

@jgermann

Per your request I formatted my 255W using Windows 7 format with a check mark beside “Quick Format”, and the free version of EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard 8.0 was able to recover all files except the main map which, as you stated, is too big to be recovered by the free version.

But when I formatted without the check mark beside “Quick Format”, neither EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard 8.0 or Recuva could find any files on the Garmin drive.

Note: “Deep scan” was used in all cases.

Makes sense

The quick format simple wipes the directory information from the FATs (File Allocation Tables) while the long format actually wipes all the data from the platter. Being M$, it can be recovered with very expensive programs out there (and by law enforcement), but for you and me, consider it gone. This is why government agencies require a high level, thorough format of any drives they don't destroy when done with.

--
Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

"Paranoid Fear"

Frovingslosh wrote:

………
And I'm not sure how they could come down on me if I bothered to come up with a fix and distribute it. I don't think that such a fix would fall within the prevue of the draconian DCMA, and I sure didn't agree to anything that would prevent me from doing so when I bought the GPS receiver.

I was not thinking in terms of copyright violation – I was thinking in terms of violating the reverse engineering clause in Garmin’s “Software License Agreement”.

The fix I described involves reverse engineering the firmware to circumvent the PIN. Basically an .rgn file that jumps over the PIN check is what is needed.

This statement is in the manual for my 255W and also can be seen when firmware is downloaded:

Garmin Software License Agreement wrote:

…..
You agree not to decompile, disassemble, modify, reverse assemble, reverse engineer, or reduce to human readable form the Software or any part thereof or create any derivative works based on the Software

I think the person who created the “cure .rgn” files used in the GarminCure3 method to recover a “bricked” Garmin is actually in violation of that agreement yet posting the files and procedure is apparently allowed both by Poi Factory admin and the gpspassion forum admin. I am not sure why it is allowed but guess it is because the method does not attempt to breach any security and is not offered for sale, so the admins think it is OK.

That person is obviously capable of creating an .rgn file that would bypass the PIN but none has been posted there. And no doubt there are many others in the world that are capable.

I have spent a fair amount of time searching both in English and Russian for someone posting a firmware “fix” to the PIN problem but so far have not found any. So I am thinking that I am not the only one who has a “Paranoid Fear” of doing so.

On the other hand, I think your statement “They even seem to have given up on the foolish PIN approach in the more recent GPS receivers.” is interesting and may lead some brave soul to post an .rgn fix to the PIN lock problem and perhaps convince site admins to allow the post.

When that happens it will be interesting to see if Garmin complains to the site owner about the posts.

We don't need no stinkin' manual.

Evert wrote:

This statement is in the manual for my 255W and also can be seen when firmware is downloaded:...

That's interesting, but my nuvi 250 didn't even come with a manual. Even if it had I doubt that including such a "claimed right" in the box that is never agreed to could be upheld by any court. So if someone doesn't do a firmware upgrade and supposedly acknowledge the restriction with a click (itself often thrown out by the courts) then I don't think that Garmin has any claim to stand on.

@Evert

Evert wrote:

Per your request I formatted my 255W using Windows 7 format with a check mark beside “Quick Format”, and the free version of EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard 8.0 was able to recover all files except the main map which, as you stated, is too big to be recovered by the free version.

But when I formatted without the check mark beside “Quick Format”, neither EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard 8.0 or Recuva could find any files on the Garmin drive.

Note: “Deep scan” was used in all cases.

We appreciate your efforts is checking this situation out. It gives us a better feel for how we should respond to people who have found us by Googleing "accidentally formatted"

What I'll bet a lot of us would love to see is for you to take your testing notes in this thread and turn them into a FAQ that we could use as reference. You have done a lot of work and having it quickly available would be very valuable.

I spent a number of hours on Google reading about recovering from a format (accidental or otherwise). These articles pointed out that the default "quick format" was sort of like deleting files. However, in the case of formatting a thumb drive or a GPS device, the fact that one would then be writing something to the device is extremely remote. Thus, being able to recover all of the files is highly likely.

What some of the articles I was reading pointed out was that - assuming your really did not want the data on the "drive" to be recoverable - you had to uncheck "quick format" in the "Format Options" section. You have verified this to be the case.

Since there will be a few times when someone "accidentally" formats a GPS, a FAQ from you on how to recover the files would be a lifesaver for them.

EULA

Frovingslosh wrote:
Evert wrote:

This statement is in the manual for my 255W and also can be seen when firmware is downloaded:...

That's interesting, but my nuvi 250 didn't even come with a manual. Even if it had I doubt that including such a "claimed right" in the box that is never agreed to could be upheld by any court. So if someone doesn't do a firmware upgrade and supposedly acknowledge the restriction with a click (itself often thrown out by the courts) then I don't think that Garmin has any claim to stand on.

Older Garmin models had the EULA from which Evert quoted in the manuals. That has not been true with newer models.

However, there is an EULA with those words in the device itself - accessed by Settings > Device. By simply using the device, you are agreeing to those terms.

oh come now

jgermann wrote:

However, there is an EULA with those words in the device itself - accessed by Settings > Device. By simply using the device, you are agreeing to those terms.

You're suggesting that because they managed to hide some restriction deep within the menus, where someone might never see it, and where it is never clicked through to agree to, their customers are bound by that??? How many judges do you think they would have to buy to get that to hold up?

yes, he is

Frovingslosh wrote:
jgermann wrote:

However, there is an EULA with those words in the device itself - accessed by Settings > Device. By simply using the device, you are agreeing to those terms.

You're suggesting that because they managed to hide some restriction deep within the menus, where someone might never see it, and where it is never clicked through to agree to, their customers are bound by that??? How many judges do you think they would have to buy to get that to hold up?

The courts have upheld the rights of software developers in many instances where people have attempted to state they didn't agree/read all the fine print. The software installed on your unit is covered under the same laws and rulings any boxed software enjoys.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

I think it would hold up

Frovingslosh wrote:
jgermann wrote:

However, there is an EULA with those words in the device itself - accessed by Settings > Device. By simply using the device, you are agreeing to those terms.

You're suggesting that because they managed to hide some restriction deep within the menus, where someone might never see it, and where it is never clicked through to agree to, their customers are bound by that??? How many judges do you think they would have to buy to get that to hold up?

@Frovingslosh, you are looking at this backwards, it seems to me. Judges would come into the picture only after the copyright holder decided that it meant enough to them to pursue their rights under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

not when the conditions are hidden

Box Car wrote:

The courts have upheld the rights of software developers in many instances where people have attempted to state they didn't agree/read all the fine print....

And that is why the fine print is usually part of a click-through agreement. Even if the buyer says that he didn't read what he clicked through to use the thing he bought, at least he had an honest chance to read it. And even then the courts have found some clauses of such click through agreements invalid when they contradict basic contract law. I don't think that conditions of use that are just buried deep in the menu structure and can ever be enforced.

What Can I Say...!...?

bontex wrote:

goodmorning,i'm intelligent:i formatted completaly my garmin,i resolved the wrong format by using garminsecurity3,but now i miss the operating system.i try to find the installer,or something like it,but it s quite difficult...and i didn t back up my device....so,if someone can help me,thanks really a lot,i hope
have a nice day

The above post speaks for itself! wink rolleyes

Nuvi1300WTGPS

--
I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

Talks like a duck

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

The above post speaks for itself! wink rolleyes

Nuvi1300WTGPS

That post plus the other posts by the OP yells one word to me: Contrived.

But I have been mistaken more than once about posts like that.

Perhaps with a few more years experience I will be able to declare "ok i m intelligent.now" smile

i don't know

Frovingslosh wrote:
Box Car wrote:

The courts have upheld the rights of software developers in many instances where people have attempted to state they didn't agree/read all the fine print....

And that is why the fine print is usually part of a click-through agreement. Even if the buyer says that he didn't read what he clicked through to use the thing he bought, at least he had an honest chance to read it. And even then the courts have found some clauses of such click through agreements invalid when they contradict basic contract law. I don't think that conditions of use that are just buried deep in the menu structure and can ever be enforced.

I don't know who is giving you your legal advice on copyrights and limitations but I go to the head of the Intellectual Property division atone of th major law firms in DC.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

Italian

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:
bontex wrote:

goodmorning,i'm intelligent:i formatted completaly my garmin,i resolved the wrong format by using garminsecurity3,but now i miss the operating system.i try to find the installer,or something like it,but it s quite difficult...and i didn t back up my device....so,if someone can help me,thanks really a lot,i hope
have a nice day

The above post speaks for itself! wink rolleyes

Nuvi1300WTGPS

If you were trying to convey this info in Italian, how correct would your statement appear to those in Italy?

Language Determination

CraigW, I am curious how you determined that the OP is Italian by his first post.

When I first read it I noticed the words “good morning” and the time was right at 3 pm Mountain time. So I figured that the OP was at least 3 hours East of me which would indicate maybe somewhere in South America. But if it was much earlier in the morning, say 8 am, it would be 7 hours East which would indicate somewhere in Europe.

Anyway, I figured that likely the OP’s native tongue was not English but saw nothing that would indicate Italian.

3 PM MTN time would be 5 PM

3 PM MTN time would be 5 PM Easter time. If he is morning to you he would be at least 3 hours behind you. HI is 8 hrs behind EST. So 3 mst would be 9 AM HI time,

You went the worng way.

--
Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Belay that

I looked at bontex's profile and see that Italy is listed as location.

Given my poor memory, I cannot say for sure but I don't think the location was listed when I looked at the profile at the time of bontex's first post.

I looked fairly early

Evert wrote:

I looked at bontex's profile and see that Italy is listed as location.

Given my poor memory, I cannot say for sure but I don't think the location was listed when I looked at the profile at the time of bontex's first post.

I looked fairly early in this posting and it had Italy there.

I always look at where we are all from. Just something I enjoy. Some don't share ....

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Blunder

phranc wrote:

3 PM MTN time would be 5 PM Easter time. If he is morning to you he would be at least 3 hours behind you. HI is 8 hrs behind EST. So 3 mst would be 9 AM HI time,

You went the worng way.

Thank you.

I am embarrassed that I made such a blunder.

From another blunder

Evert wrote:
phranc wrote:

3 PM MTN time would be 5 PM Easter time. If he is morning to you he would be at least 3 hours behind you. HI is 8 hrs behind EST. So 3 mst would be 9 AM HI time,

You went the worng way.

Thank you.

I am embarrassed that I made such a blunder.

You wouldn't be like the rest of us if you didn't blunder every now and then.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Recalculating :)

Since the OP's profile shows location is Italy, Hawaii is not correct.

A world time zone map shows that Italy is 9 hours ahead of my time (which was 3pm). So looks like I was headed in the right direction but did not go far enough, and the post must have been made very early in the morning in Italy i.e. right around midnight starting the next day.

{I hope I have not made another blunder.} smile

Moral support

mgarledge wrote:

You wouldn't be like the rest of us if you didn't blunder every now and then.

Mary, thank you for your moral support at a time that I desperately needed it. smile

Time zone troubles

Evert wrote:

I am embarrassed that I made such a blunder.

Just before Y2K our office had a visitor from South Africa that wanted to set up a video conference between our offices just as the new year came in in SA. He went to great pains to explain how everything would work "once he got back home to Pretoria." He was very upset with me when I kept telling him there wasn't enough time to make all the arrangements he wanted to make, but he kept going on how they were 9 hours earlier and everything would fall into place when he flew home. I finally was able to convince him, much to the delight of all my coworkers, it wouldn't work because he left out the fact his flight was 15 hours and at the time he was holding this conference, his plane was about 800 miles out over the Atlantic.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

'S all good!

Evert wrote:
phranc wrote:

3 PM MTN time would be 5 PM Easter time. If he is morning to you he would be at least 3 hours behind you. HI is 8 hrs behind EST. So 3 mst would be 9 AM HI time,

You went the worng way.

Thank you.

I am embarrassed that I made such a blunder.

'S all good. Try crossing the Pacific eastward and changing TZ every 2 days and the International Date line and not only having to keep up the time, but with what daggoned day it is.

--
Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

It can always be worse

Box Car wrote:

Time zone troubles

Evert wrote:

I am embarrassed that I made such a blunder.

...

Try living in a state that doesn't observe Daylight Saving (unless you're on the Reservation—no, not that one, the other Reservation)—and most of your relatives and friends are in states with DST...then count the days before one of you calls and gets the other out of bed.

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