Site slow?

 

Is it me or is the site slow on page loading tonight???

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Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

All seems normal

The pages on the site load quickly at this end.

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Nüvi 255WT with nüMaps Lifetime North America born on 602117815 / Nüvi 3597LMTHD born on 805972514 / I love Friday’s except when I’m on holidays ~ canuk

Seems very slow

Right now

--
"You can't get there from here"

Speed

canuk wrote:

The pages on the site load quickly at this end.

Same here

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(formerly known as condump) RV 770 LMT-S, Nuvi2797LMT, Nuvi765T

Same

Same for me.

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Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, DriveSmart 61, Garmin Backup Camera 40 and TomTom XXL540s.

Slow here

On the morning of August 6th, the site would not even come up until after 10am EST.

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

No problems at this time

As the title says . . .

- Tom -

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XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

Glad all seems to be well

Glad all seems to be well now.

long delays

I saw long delays a few hours ago, long enough that Firefox informed me that the site had timed out. Seems ok at the moment, but it would be silly to say that there are no problems based on the people who can get in.

Seems OK tonight

Well, who knows what goes on out there on the internet servers.

It's amazing how all those packets take different routes and still arrive at this end, and in order!

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Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

really?

metricman wrote:

... still arrive at this end, and in order!

What makes you think they always arrive in order?

because

Frovingslosh wrote:
metricman wrote:

... still arrive at this end, and in order!

What makes you think they always arrive in order?

the Internet me told so?

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

order

Putting things in order causes an increase in entropy. idea

Also, packets have to arrive in order for you to be able to use them. smile

They get there when they get there

Like Foghorn Leghorn's feathers, they are numbered, 'For just such an occasion'.

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Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

correcting misinformation

Evert wrote:

Also, packets have to arrive in order for you to be able to use them. smile

No, they don't. I'm fine with you believing that yourself, but you shouldn't be spreading such misinformation. Your system's TCP/IP stack is quite capable or putting together packets received out of order and displaying the result properly. For TCP/IP connections (as opposed to UDP) it is also capable of requesting a retransmit of a TCP/IP packet that never made it and still retaining the other packets that did make it so that everything does not need to be retransmitted. And, of course, it is capable of receiving many packets at (nearly) the same time from different sources or even from the same source that apply to different things (such as text files and image files) and putting the packets together properly no matter what came in when.

Internet protocols are well documented on the Internet (Imagine that!), perhaps you should read up a little before sharing your knowledge with the community.

Failed joke

Frovingslosh wrote:
Evert wrote:

Also, packets have to arrive in order for you to be able to use them. smile

No, they don't. I'm fine with you believing that yourself, but you shouldn't be spreading such misinformation. Your system's TCP/IP stack is quite capable or putting together packets received out of order and displaying the result properly. For TCP/IP connections (as opposed to UDP) it is also capable of requesting a retransmit of a TCP/IP packet that never made it and still retaining the other packets that did make it so that everything does not need to be retransmitted. And, of course, it is capable of receiving many packets at (nearly) the same time from different sources or even from the same source that apply to different things (such as text files and image files) and putting the packets together properly no matter what came in when.

Internet protocols are well documented on the Internet (Imagine that!), perhaps you should read up a little before sharing your knowledge with the community.

I know very well that packets of a file transferred under TCP would seldom if ever arrive in the order they were sent. I am a District Technology Coordinator for AARP Taxaide and they brought me onboard because of my knowledge of networking. I am not an IT expert but have been working with computer networks since the early 1990s starting with Novell networks.(If you count using a TTY 33 and an acoustic coupler as a terminal to connect to a remote computer, then my experience goes back to 1970).

I was trying to make a joke using a play on words based on the difference in saying “in order” and saying “in order for”. Hence the smiley face.

If you read my post very carefully you should be able to see that I did not say that the packets have to arrive in order.

"Packets have to arrive in order for you to be able to use them." (Which means to use them, they have to get to you (in whatever order). {The intended joke.}

And as the old saying goes: jokes are not funny if one has to explain them. 

don't panic

Cool your jets people wink They have to do maintenance sometimes, so - my guess is - it may be it. If it will continue for few days then there is some problem. I's sure it will be back to normal speed quickly.

Problems?

I'm not having any speed problems now or for the past several days.

Fred

"Reading Up"

Frovingslosh wrote:

…….
Internet protocols are well documented on the Internet (Imagine that!), perhaps you should read up a little before sharing your knowledge with the community.

Thanks but I have several books that cover Internet (and other) protocols. I know I am not the sharpest knife in the drawer but I have been “reading up” on the subject for several decades.

Speaking of other protocols, I was thinking about other times that I used a telephone connection to connect to a remote computer and I recall that while I was working at Sandia Laboratories in Technical Area IV, I used telephone modem connection to a DEC PDP-10 computer located in Technical Area I. That was during 1966 – late 1969.

I was designing a capacitor bank discharge system to explode a wire that started a detonation front in a DuPont Detasheet that had been formed with a cosine distribution of thickness for us by the Pantex facility in Texas and I used the PDP-10 to do some of the calculations.

BTW As you probably know, ARPANET was the first to use TCP/IP. I was working at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque at the time ARPANET was being developed but it was not available to us at the time that I left in late 1969. But I did “read up” about it at that time.

We did use telephone modems to communicate with sister labs (Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore) and get Tech Bulletins from NASA.

LOL, Evert

I do believe that was a 'ZING'! wink

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

I'm impressed

And that ain't no joke. (I can accomplish pretty much what I want to with a computer, but as far as the technical aspects, I just don't get it. So, I'm really impressed when someone exhibits the knowledge that some of you folks do.) Oh, and by the way, I have had no problems with the site being slow.

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

Run a Trace Route

I like to run a "trace route" to see the path my packets are taking. It can also help me spot where the problems are happening.

Open a command prompt (on a window PC, you can select Run from the start menu and type in CMD).

then type this command to see the path to poi factory

C:\>tracert www.poi-factory.com

I also like to check keynote's internet traffic report:

http://internetpulse.net/Main.aspx?Metric=PL

Right now, for example, it shows 12.5% of the packets coming into CenturyLink from Level3 are being dropped. And Verizon has severe congestion to/from Cogent.

Traffic fluctuates a lot, so this changes from hour to hour. It's a lot like the freeway system in a big city like Los Angeles.

speeds

Evert wrote:

BTW As you probably know, ARPANET was the first to use TCP/IP. I was working at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque at the time ARPANET was being developed but it was not available to us at the time that I left in late 1969. But I did “read up” about it at that time.

We did use telephone modems to communicate with sister labs (Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore) and get Tech Bulletins from NASA.

The last segment of the Internet backbone was upgraded from 9600 Baud to T-1 in 1993. It was into and out of Lawrence Livermore Labs.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Speeds

Box Car wrote:

The last segment of the Internet backbone was upgraded from 9600 Baud to T-1 in 1993. It was into and out of Lawrence Livermore Labs.

That is interesting to know.

I don’t recall what speed we were using but I suspect it was 300 Baud.

Although several of my UNM classmates worked at Los Alamos and LLNL I pretty much lost contact with them when I left the Nuclear Weapon Program and started designing equipment for civilian Nuclear Power Plants.

My brother stayed at Sandia Labs until he died in 1993. He was involved in writing software and procuring computers for the seismic verification of nuclear bomb test ban compliance. He dealt with equipment at several worldwide monitoring sites and ways to send the data back without being intercepted by the Russians. (They had been intercepting the data, altering it and then sending it on.)

He no doubt knew in great detail the network connections and methods that were used but he could not tell me since I no longer had a Q clearance nor had a “need to know”.

we know what backbone means

Evert wrote:
Box Car wrote:

The last segment of the Internet backbone was upgraded from 9600 Baud to T-1 in 1993. It was into and out of Lawrence Livermore Labs.

That is interesting to know.

I don’t recall what speed we were using but I suspect it was 300 Baud.

Although several of my UNM classmates worked at Los Alamos and LLNL I pretty much lost contact with them when I left the Nuclear Weapon Program and started designing equipment for civilian Nuclear Power Plants.

My brother stayed at Sandia Labs until he died in 1993. He was involved in writing software and procuring computers for the seismic verification of nuclear bomb test ban compliance. He dealt with equipment at several worldwide monitoring sites and ways to send the data back without being intercepted by the Russians. (They had been intercepting the data, altering it and then sending it on.)

He no doubt knew in great detail the network connections and methods that were used but he could not tell me since I no longer had a Q clearance nor had a “need to know”.

But for the others on the thread, the backbone is the portion of the Internet connecting the primary sites through which all traffic is routed. In the DC area the backbone connection used to be at the University of Maryland in College Park. But all the major military research facilities used to have direct backbone connections. I have to assume there is also a connection at Fort Meade so NSA can snoop.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

All the snooping

Box Car wrote:

...But all the major military research facilities used to have direct backbone connections. I have to assume there is also a connection at Fort Meade so NSA can snoop.

So the faster the backbone for the snoopers the slower our connection is?

dobs108 smile

My faulty memory

I have been doing some searching and see that TCP/IP was developed during the 1970s and was not adopted by DARPA until 1983.

So the protocol I was reading up on in the late 1960s would have been the original one – Network Control Program (NCP).

The reading I did on TCP/IP would have started in the 1980s.

The tubes are slow for me in general

I can't say that this site is slower for me than most others though.

Sandia Library

One of the things really I liked about working at Sandia Laboratories was the availability of technical information in their library. No matter what the topic you usually could find one or more Sandia Reports about it and “read up” on it.

They have made some of their library resources available to the public here:
http://www.sandia.gov/resources/employees/technical_library/...

For example you could search for “TCP/IP” and come up with reports such as this:
http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/919170

excerpt wrote:

Historically, TCP/IP has been the protocol suite used to transfer data throughout the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) community. However, TCP was developed many years ago for an environment very different from the ASC Wide Area Network (WAN) of today. There have been numerous publications that hint of better performance if modifications were made to the TCP algorithms or a different protocol was used to transfer data across a high bandwidth, high delay WAN. Since Sandia National Laboratories wants to maximize the ASC WAN performance to support the Thor's Hammer supercomputer, there is strong interest in evaluating modifications to the TCP protocol and in evaluating alternatives to TCP, such as SCTP, to determine if they provide improved performance. Therefore, the goal of this project is to test, evaluate, compare, and report protocol technologies that enhance the performance of the ASC WAN.

The report is somewhat dated but shows the kind of reports available.

Note:"The Advanced Simulation & Computing Wide Area Network (ASC WAN) is a high delay-bandwidth network connection between US Department of Energy National Laboratories."

Maybe what we need to speed things up is a Thor's Hammer supercomputer and use of SCTP. idea mrgreen