Things not to buy in 2014

 

GPS devices

Up until a few years ago, personal navigation systems were considered a must-have for most drivers since they drastically reduced the chances of getting lost. But the tides have turned and demand for these gadgets is plummeting: 7.5 million personal navigation devices sold in 2012 in North America, down from a peak of 18 million in 2009, according to the latest data from Berg Insight, a Swedish research company.

The need for this service still exists, but consumers can get it for a lot cheaper. Rather than paying $70 to $300 for a new GPS device, drivers can use map apps to get around. They’re available on most smartphones or free to download.

Separately, many new cars come with built-in navigation systems: 49% of 2013 model-year vehicles have a standard navigation system (in at least one of their styles), up from 33% of 2010 models, according to Edmunds.com.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/10-things-not-to-buy-in-201...

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Nuvi 2460LMT

Things not to buy in 2014

Smartphones, anything "powered by Android." or stores "to the cloud."
Anything that looks or works like Windows 8.
Anything that begins w/the letter "i"
Any wireless account beyond your '2 year voice only..'
Get a library card ... it's free. You'll be surprised what they have available for the borrow.
A smart (wrist)watch is an oxymoron.

and finally:

Anything being marketed as "amazing."

I can hear you now in the past...

Phones you can dial yourself without an operator? Who needs 'em...

Phones that have buttons that beep? Who needs 'em... rotary dial is where it's at...

Horseless carriage? They'll never catch on... I'll keep my buggy-whip business thank you very much...

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*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

Well...

No matter how deep you keep your head in the sand, there will always be erosion.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Thing to buy in 2014

Well whatever. I still prefer a standalone GPS to a smartphone or built-in one. We drive across the country and there are still too many areas where data coverage is spotty, as my iPad (in a passenger seat!) reminds me all too often, and running the data meter all day long isn't smart either. Built-in GPSs in new cars are a poor value in comparison to standalone given the high cost of console GPS in new cars and the high cost of updating them when that must be done with the dealer. We keep new cars over 10 years now. Who wants a 12-year-old GPS?

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JMoo On

i'll stick with my nuvi ...

Smartphone GPS is the perfect way to get lost. Plus, I'm saving twenty bucks per month. My GPS is fully paid for.

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it's the dog's fault

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Garmin nuvi 2455 - nuvi 350, 260 (spares) - my other toys: IMac quad-core i3, Mac Mini, MacOS: Mojave 10.14.6 and introducing The Beast, a 2013 Dodge Charger Pursuit and his Garmin DriveSmart 5. The dog's name is Ginger.

Keeping GPS unit here.

Will not use my smartphone for GPS in the car for all the above reasons.

OK for walking around in an unfamiliar sections of cities. But only for limited/short time connections.

Sorry, but I don't think the standalone GPS is dead yet.

And forget about built in car navigation systems. Have yet to use one I really like.

OnStar? not at $200-300 per year subscription.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

Good Bleepin' Grief...

dagarmin wrote:

Well whatever. I still prefer a standalone GPS to a smartphone or built-in one. We drive across the country and there are still too many areas where data coverage is spotty, as my iPad (in a passenger seat!) reminds me all too often, and running the data meter all day long isn't smart either. Built-in GPSs in new cars are a poor value in comparison to standalone given the high cost of console GPS in new cars and the high cost of updating them when that must be done with the dealer. We keep new cars over 10 years now. Who wants a 12-year-old GPS?

When will the meme that smartphones/tablets must have a data signal all the time for a navigation app to work die the death it deserves?

It's utter bovine ordure.

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

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*Keith* MacBook Pro *wifi iPad(2012) w/BadElf GPS & iPhone6 + Navigon*

Against the trend.

I guess I am going against the trend, as I just bought a nuvi 3597LMTHD to add to my collection of stand-alone GPS devices. I also have a Samsung Galaxy Note tablet (android) with GPS capabilities, and I do enjoy its location services and apps. But for navigation, I still prefer the stand alone Garmin, and so far I am happy with the 3597.

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Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

Know Your Meme

kch50428 wrote:

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

For Android, you have CoPilot Plus, NavFree, OsmAnd, and a few others that all store their maps on the device. In fact, NavFree no longer requires a data connection at all to function, though it still has the Google-based POI search available if desired.

The sad thing is that the meme will never die, because Google Maps and possibly Apple Maps as well, require a data connection simply to download maps along the route. Since both are included on their respective OSes and since both are then readily available to the user, the meme persists.

Using the people who live in my apartment building as a statistical representation of the average, the average user is simply ignorant of the alternatives. In other words, they simply don't know any better. However, it's rather shocking that the meme persists on a GPS enthusiast site, where people SHOULD know better.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

No tablet to carry either

kch50428 wrote:

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

I don't carry a tablet around. I like the compactness of a smartphone. And it does use my data plan's data bytes to use the navigation app.

While useful, it is not for me to drive with.

--
I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

99% need a data connection

kch50428 wrote:

When will the meme that smartphones/tablets must have a data signal all the time for a navigation app to work die the death it deserves?

It's utter bovine ordure.

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

The vast majority of people who use smartphones for navigation are using online maps and free online apps. So the old 'myth' holds true for most of them. I still prefer my standalone GPS, but for shorter trips, I love the data connectivity that comes along with an online app on my phone.

It's hard to beat FREE

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

.... the average user is simply ignorant of the alternatives. In other words, they simply don't know any better.

And even more important, can't get beyond the fact that what they have is free. It's really hard to beat free.

2014?

I've heard this for the last couple of years, and I still think the announcement is premature. Yes, I understand the demise of a stand-alone GPS will come, but there are still enough die-hards like me.

The statement may come true in as early as two years, and I'd guess no more than ten. But in the next 12 months?

Nah!

--
nüvi 750 & 760

Fip Phone

I still use a flip phone, thank you, and no intention of "upgrading" to a smart-alec phone unless absolutely forced to do so. I had the navigation feature in the vehicle for a while. It got me lost twice and the nice lady at the call center refused to believe I was headed in the wrong direction. You like vanilla, I like chocolate, and there is plenty of both to satisfy our personal preferences. Happy and safe travels to all!

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Garmin nuvi 50LM

@johnc

NavFree and OsmAnd are both free, thus there is no excuse to not use one or the other, except for ignorance. NavFree is a bit more polished than OsmAnd, but I wish it would implement OsmAnd's map download interface. In NavFree you have a list of maps, but have to go and individually download each and every map, which is annoying. OsmAnd has a similar list, but it uses checkmarks. Multiple checkmarks can be selected and the app will download all the maps in order.

--
"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

What?

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

Using the people who live in my apartment building as a statistical representation of the average, the average user is simply ignorant of the alternatives. In other words, they simply don't know any better. However, it's rather shocking that the meme persists on a GPS enthusiast site, where people SHOULD know better.

Just because some people choose to not use "the alternatives" in no way makes them ignorant or makes them "simply a case of not knowing better". PLEASE!

This war between the smartphone "everything" users and those of us who still prefer to use a standalone GPS device is simply a waste of everyone's time.

Let's not get into flaming everyone who disagrees.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

Thanks diesel

diesel wrote:

No matter how deep you keep your head in the sand, there will always be erosion.

I needed a good laugh! grin

--
Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go

Personal Preference

KenSny wrote:

Just because some people choose to not use "the alternatives" in no way makes them ignorant or makes them "simply a case of not knowing better". PLEASE!

This war between the smartphone "everything" users and those of us who still prefer to use a standalone GPS device is simply a waste of everyone's time.

Let's not get into flaming everyone who disagrees.

I completely agree with KenSny!

People adopt innovation at different rates, and for multiple reasons. There is a whole field of psychology (and advertising) that identifies and evaluates the factors affecting adoption of innovation.

People who are initial adopters can look down their noses at others as being luddites, while those who are slower to utilize emerging technology can claim the other group is just a bunch of fan boys of the new toys.

Such rivalry can be humorous amongst friends but gets old really fast in the cyber world.

ignorance or prefernce?

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

NavFree and OsmAnd are both free, thus there is no excuse to not use one or the other, except for ignorance. NavFree is a bit more polished than OsmAnd, but I wish it would implement OsmAnd's map download interface. In NavFree you have a list of maps, but have to go and individually download each and every map, which is annoying. OsmAnd has a similar list, but it uses checkmarks. Multiple checkmarks can be selected and the app will download all the maps in order.

I agree that the use of the label ignorance in the context of the post is defamatory toward a great many users. In Strepron's defense, the word essentially means without knowledge and is correctly used. Perhaps a better wording would have been to state others are ignorant of their existence, which conveys the same "without knowledge" intent without the application of a label.

While it is true that a great many users never begin to approach the full use of the capabilities of their devices, they often stop, and I am one, at where this highly customizable device suits their needs. Like many, they see little need to install an application which performs essentially the same function as the one pre-installed by their carrier which cannot be removed without going through still more hoops.

While the add-on application may have greater functionality than the installed app, if the installed one accomplishes the task, why play with another? Yes. a great many arguments can be put forward on why you should use the add-on app, but it still comes down to personal preferences on your PERSONAL device.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

Silly

I know a few people that eschew new technology, such as smartphones. They insist that a simple phone is all that is necessary, and nobody needs a smartphone and all a smartphone can do.

Here's a few examples of how they live by their virtues.

One day, one of these people came to me and asks me to call one of our mutual friends. I ask why and she replies that she does not know how to store phone numbers in her simple phone, and she does not have the phone number written with the long list on paper of other phone numbers she keeps nearby. And she doesn't miss a chance to ridicule me for having an iPhone.

Then another time, a couple of these people wanted to know some information about something they wanted to buy, so they asked me to look it up using my iPhone. And these guys insist a simple cell phone with only a phone function is all they need.

And I have some family that lives in Pennsylvania, where there is a large population of a faith that is supposed to live plainly. This means they aren't supposed to use phones at all. So they don't own phones, but go to their neighbors that do and use their phones. And when you pass one of their places of worship, the parking lot is filled with Cadillacs, black of course.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Question Was Asked And Answered

Box Car wrote:

While the add-on application may have greater functionality than the installed app, if the installed one accomplishes the task, why play with another? Yes. a great many arguments can be put forward on why you should use the add-on app, but it still comes down to personal preferences on your PERSONAL device.

Why "play" with another? Pretty simple and explained many, many times. In the context of this thread, the discussion was on map apps, and how some still do not understand that there are map apps that do not require a connection to cell service. These apps will work in the absence of cell service, and can navigate in the absence of cell phone service, effectively making the smartphone a stand-alone GPS. Other map apps require a connection to the cell system to regularly retrieve navigation data and these will not work in the absence of cell service.

So it is not a matter of "playing", it is a matter of making sure the user has a navigation ability that is independent of the cell system. That is not playing, it is very smart. The map app that relies on a regular connection to the cell system can not accomplish the mapping and navigation task without cell service. I've done many long road trips across country and into wilderness areas where self-contained navigation capability was needed and cell service was non-existent which rendered the OEM apps useless. I've gone for days without cell service, and hence, without cell system dependent navigation. Putting an app with self-contained maps on a smartphone is prudent and safe, not playing.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Apple Picking

After seeing so many news reports of people being robbed of their smart phones, we'll stick with our dumb $15 phones for now. They work fine, have cheap service, and are not worth stealing. For navigation, a Garmin with added POI files serves our needs nicely.

GPS or...?

When I joined this site, I was looking for a place to help me better utilize my newly acquired GPS. I supposed this was it since the home page said, "POI FACTORY: new & interesting places for your GPS." Then, "POI FACTORY. Since 2006, this is where GPS users get together to share locations and discussions with other GPS users." I had no interest in whether smartphones or tablets or automotive displays could be used for navigational purposes...and still don't. If I did, I would try to find a site that discussed such devices. It doesn't bother me if others consider that to be ignorance on my part, for ignorance is bliss.

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Garmin nuvi 50LM

For me personally, I prefer

For me personally, I prefer to have a dedicated GPS. For one thing, I like the user interface. I like that the GPS can do it's job and you can use your phone for other tasks. I would much rather have the ability to multitask. Unless you don't have or don't want to spend the money on a dedicated GPS, I still prefer to have both.

Sorry Diesel, but

diesel wrote:
Box Car wrote:

While the add-on application may have greater functionality than the installed app, if the installed one accomplishes the task, why play with another? Yes. a great many arguments can be put forward on why you should use the add-on app, but it still comes down to personal preferences on your PERSONAL device.

Why "play" with another? Pretty simple and explained many, many times. In the context of this thread, the discussion was on map apps, and how some still do not understand that there are map apps that do not require a connection to cell service. These apps will work in the absence of cell service, and can navigate in the absence of cell phone service, effectively making the smartphone a stand-alone GPS. Other map apps require a connection to the cell system to regularly retrieve navigation data and these will not work in the absence of cell service.

So it is not a matter of "playing", it is a matter of making sure the user has a navigation ability that is independent of the cell system. That is not playing, it is very smart. The map app that relies on a regular connection to the cell system can not accomplish the mapping and navigation task without cell service. I've done many long road trips across country and into wilderness areas where self-contained navigation capability was needed and cell service was non-existent which rendered the OEM apps useless. I've gone for days without cell service, and hence, without cell system dependent navigation. Putting an app with self-contained maps on a smartphone is prudent and safe, not playing.

I disagree with the premise. If an installed app meets needs for the occasional user, which more aptly describes those complaining about coverage issues, why load another app that accomplishes the same function even if it stores all the maps to the device? Remember, we are not talking about those that use the nav app on their phone as their primary source of directional information but the casual user that fires up the app when they want to go someplace and they have no real idea of how to get from where they are to where they wish to be.

I know if I want to drive from the east coast to the west coast, I can get on an Interstate ending in an even number and be headed in the correct direction as long as it's west. What I may not know is how to get to that particular location within the destination city and that is why I need directions. Those of us in this forum are not what I would consider "occasional" users of PND devices or applications. We are a knowledgeable group that has researched and tested various solutions and selected those that fit our particular needs.

I have friends that have both a PND and a smartphone but still go to an online service to find a location and then print out the directions to follow. It boils down to expectations, and each of us have different expectations of the methods we use. The expectation of the vast majority is that cellular service is ubiquitous and we know it isn't. Because WE know cellular service isn't universal, we compensate by having other devices and applications that function when cellular service and Internet access isn't available.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

Police Warn About GPS Thefts

EV Driver wrote:

After seeing so many news reports of people being robbed of their smart phones, we'll stick with our dumb $15 phones for now. They work fine, have cheap service, and are not worth stealing. For navigation, a Garmin with added POI files serves our needs nicely.

What are you going to do? There are reports about the epidemic of car break-ins where the target is the GPS. Police advise people to wipe the windows clean so the suction cup mark is gone, a sign that a GPS is in the car.

GPS theft problems are on par with smartphone thefts.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Are You Really Agreeing With Me?

Box Car wrote:

I disagree with the premise.

I have friends that have both a PND and a smartphone but still go to an online service to find a location and then print out the directions to follow. It boils down to expectations, and each of us have different expectations of the methods we use. The expectation of the vast majority is that cellular service is ubiquitous and we know it isn't. Because WE know cellular service isn't universal, we compensate by having other devices and applications that function when cellular service and Internet access isn't available.

Well, you disagree with the premise, but that last paragraph appears to agree with with my premise.

It's not expectations. Many people just don't know. And they just don't know for whatever or many reasons. It is still amazing that this forum, where you think we are more knowledgeable than the casual user, still deals regularly with people that do not have clue about map apps that do and do not have onboard maps and therefore can and can not function respectively as a stand-alone GPS that is independent of the cell system.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

yes - and no

diesel wrote:

Well, you disagree with the premise, but that last paragraph appears to agree with with my premise.

BoxCar wrote:

It's not expectations. Many people just don't know. And they just don't know for whatever or many reasons. It is still amazing that this forum, where you think we are more knowledgeable than the casual user, still deals regularly with people that do not have clue about map apps that do and do not have onboard maps and therefore can and can not function respectively as a stand-alone GPS that is independent of the cell system.

The expectations are the differentiators. When you walk into a dark room you expect to be able to flip a switch and lights will come on. You don't give it a second thought. You expect electricity to be present and lights to be illuminated. It's the same expectation the average (great majority of) people have regarding cellular service. It's always been there when I needed it in the past, so it should be there now - except it isn't. So yes, we agree with the concept that there are alternatives to getting navigation services on a cell phone no matter where you are or the state of the cellular service, but not everyone plans for those instances - or even considers them - when the service isn't available. These are the same people that are upset when traveling down a rural road at 3 AM and don't see an open gas station/restaurant at almost every intersection and curse Chevron/Exxon/ whomever because their needs aren't being served.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

I, for one...

...like simple. I like my Garmin, my flip-phone, and I don't use a lap-top. My brother, on the other hand, likes his smart phone, doesn't use a stand alone GPS, and loves every new gadget he can get his hands on. We are both equally intelligent. I have a Bachelor's degree, he has an Associate's. It just depends on what you like and what you are comfortable using. If you like the new stuff, fine. If you like using old technology, that's OK also.

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It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

I'm surprised

I'm surprised you found your way "here". I would think you'd be using an abacus and a note pad instead of a computer. wink

Me? I like the challenge of learning how to use all the technology to it's fullest. I'll be 79 in 2 months and I know how to program my own DVR too. lol

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If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Love to play

diesel wrote:

....
So it is not a matter of "playing", it is a matter of making sure the user has a navigation ability that is independent of the cell system. That is not playing, it is very smart.

I think you're misinterpreting the use of the word 'play' as something frivolous. I often personally use 'playing' interchangeably with 'evaluating' or 'testing' and I think it was in that context that the OP used it. If you enjoy evaluating new things, it is not so much 'work' as it is 'play'. smile

Redundancy & augmentation

I am a firm believer in redundancy when on a road trip or a hike. I used to keep my old GPS in the trunk in case the newer one fails or hiccups. Having upgraded to a smartphone a couple years ago, my capabilities opened dramatically and I went from a backup process to an augmentation process. On the highway, the Nuvi is still the main navigator and the smartphone nicely augments the Nuvi with real-time Google searching as well as traffic. In a backup role, I have an app on the phone with downloaded street and topo maps and can get by with that if the Nuvi fails and we're in an area with no cellular reception.

Off-road/hiking, same situation. Handheld Garmin as primary navigator, with topo and routable maps. Once again, the phone app is a great augmentation to the handheld and can be used offline when needed.

Preference and usage...

I think it often just boils down to preference and usage.

I have a great smartphone and it does routing just fine. It also plays the audio books that I usually listen to when on work trips. However, for a couple of reasons, I always use my old nüvi 760.

If I use my newer car I can use bluetooth to stream to the stereo or I can use a cable to jack into the audio port. Either way I can use my phone for navigation and for audio books. (The car also has a built-in gps but I really don't use it.) Most of my work trips are not done in that car. I don't want to put a zillion miles on it for work purposes.

I use an old (1998) Buick Century for work miles. It doesn't have bluetooth and it doesn't have an audio port. It's old... I use my nüvi 760. It has the FM transmitter that lets me stream the GPS directions and the audio books to the stereo. Since I cover the northern third of California (South Lake Tahoe through Sacramento and north to the Oregon border) I can manage to use the FM transmitter and only have to switch stations here and there. The weather can make a difference as clear weather allows more station interference than overcast weather but, in general, I have the stations I need to use on the second set of radio buttons so it's pretty easy for me.

Could I use the phone? Yes. I could use it but I vastly prefer to have my audio books and my GPS directions come through the car stereo. When there are turning directions the unit automagically pauses my book and then starts it up again after the directions. It also starts it up a tiny bit prior to where it stopped so I don't miss anything.

For me, the Garmin is the way to go.

--
GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

Luddites Live Forever

I still have a sextant and a set of reduction tables and I even know where to get a current Nautical Almanac… All a little tough to use while driving a car (even a convertible), but what the heck, eh!

My apologies

kch50428 wrote:
dagarmin wrote:

Well whatever. I still prefer a standalone GPS to a smartphone or built-in one. We drive across the country and there are still too many areas where data coverage is spotty, as my iPad (in a passenger seat!) reminds me all too often, and running the data meter all day long isn't smart either. Built-in GPSs in new cars are a poor value in comparison to standalone given the high cost of console GPS in new cars and the high cost of updating them when that must be done with the dealer. We keep new cars over 10 years now. Who wants a 12-year-old GPS?

When will the meme that smartphones/tablets must have a data signal all the time for a navigation app to work die the death it deserves?

It's utter bovine ordure.

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

My apologies. I'll try to remember that this is not true. My iPad does not have GPS location--only some do. I do not have a smartphone. Still happier with my standalone GPS. Wish you well with your solutions.

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JMoo On

My apologies

kch50428 wrote:
dagarmin wrote:

Well whatever. I still prefer a standalone GPS to a smartphone or built-in one. We drive across the country and there are still too many areas where data coverage is spotty, as my iPad (in a passenger seat!) reminds me all too often, and running the data meter all day long isn't smart either. Built-in GPSs in new cars are a poor value in comparison to standalone given the high cost of console GPS in new cars and the high cost of updating them when that must be done with the dealer. We keep new cars over 10 years now. Who wants a 12-year-old GPS?

When will the meme that smartphones/tablets must have a data signal all the time for a navigation app to work die the death it deserves?

It's utter bovine ordure.

If you have the right app - no data is needed for anything other than a look-up of a POI via a database external to the app... Navigon on my iPad (wifi only, btw...) works every bit as good as my Nuvi765t.

My apologies for offending you. I'll try to remember that this is not true. My iPad Mini does not have GPS location--only some do. I do not have a smartphone--more money than I want to spend for too small a screen vs. bulging pocket for the 5" screens. Still happier with my standalone GPS for in-car. Wish you well with your solutions.

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JMoo On

Gps

smile I always prefer Gps,I like them they alway take me from point A to point B with no problem it all. The one they got hurt the most is triple AAA,I still remember what a disaster it was driving and looking the map at he same time,and if you took the wrong exit got to stop look at the map and trying to to figure out how to get to the right track again.

I like my Gps and I will keep use it for a very long time.