Who Has Left Their PND Behind And Just Used Their Smartphone?

 

As a long time PND user, I confess, on my last business trip I left it behind and just used my smartphone. Knowing that I would be in a city with good cellphone coverage helped me make that decision, but I still felt incomplete without one of my PNDs.

So how many of y'all long time PND users have bit the bullet and gone on a trip without your trusty PND?

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go
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I have....

I have a Nuvi 765T which is a pretty good PND but after doing side-by-side comparisons for 3 weeks I now use my droid as my primary GPS. It gets better reception, FREE maps, FREE apps, and I don't have to lug around my ipod, my PND, my PND cradle, my PND cord, my PND case, etc. etc.

I also use my droid as a Golf course GPS/rangefinder (free app) a guitar tuner (free app) a digital voice recorder (free app) an off-road/topo GPS (free app) and there's even an anti-mosquito app (free) that keeps the skeeters away!

I'll keep my 765T as a backup, but I don't ever see myself shelling out the money for PND ever again...

NP

--
In times of profound change, the learners will inherit the earth while the "learned" find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists...

going with my zumo

I have an LG Ally and used Google maps. It could be accurate, it could be a better navigator but I'll never really know since I can't see anything on the screen when its on the dash. Before I had the zumo (last Christmas) I tried numerous times to use it and I had to take it off the dash and hold it with my left hand while driving to find my destination. I'm not doing that again.

Even now, I looked at it the other day, when I wasn't moving, and had to take it in my hand and bring it closer and then still zoom in way further than on the zumo just to read the tiny little street names.

Now add some outdoor lighting and the screen on the Ally becomes a big washed out whiteboard, worthless.

There is NO comparison, I'm using the zumo.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

90% android at this point

I have several GPSr but find myself using an Android phone most of the time now. If Garmin would update my gear with new firmware I'd probably use it more. But it's clunky, with so many unnecessary inefficiencies. The android stuff gets better and better over time, responding to user needs and demands.

When in rougher territory (hiking, biking, caching etc) I do use dedicated hardware.

(BTW, I hate captcha)

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US-only CoPilot + android Optimus T = cheap, effective nav http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/gps/

I've found myself using my

I've found myself using my iPhone as navigation more and more lately for shorter trips. I've got an older nuvi 255 and it takes forever to get a lock. I can fire up the iPhone and get navigating in 1/10 the time. It works pretty well for shorter trips.

Droid X

I have used my Android based phone several times and it works great....no complaints at this time...

--
Bobby....Garmin 2450LM

I've left my GPS at home on

I've left my GPS at home on my most recent trips.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Tried using my smartphone

as my main GPS for my car, but it lacks some of the basic functions such as turn by turn road voice prompts. The ease of doing a quick search without cops thinking that I'm texting is a big concern as well. What happens when you forget your smartphone or give it to someone else when you need it for directions. Nothing like having a dedicated GPS for your car without trying to plan for it.

what phone?

LongAce wrote:

as my main GPS for my car, but it lacks some of the basic functions such as turn by turn road voice prompts. The ease of doing a quick search without cops thinking that I'm texting is a big concern as well. What happens when you forget your smartphone or give it to someone else when you need it for directions. Nothing like having a dedicated GPS for your car without trying to plan for it.

What phone do you have? Android phones has turn by turn voice prompts.

I usually give my standalone GPS to others to use.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

iPhone, iPad, GPS

I recently purchased an iPad II 64GB wi-fi and 3G unit. I downloaded many apps, books, converted DVD's to it, put on music and pictures as well. One of the apps I put on was a GPS app. What I liked about it was the almost 10" screen it has (I'm getting old and can't see as well as I used to). I have to admit, with my wife in the passenger seat, using the new iPad, it worked great. I have only had it one week so I am new to this newer technology. Once I have used it more, I will do a comparison. I heard there is even an app for uploading POI's to it. Haven't tried it yet. Oh, the battery runs for 10 hours before recharging. No more taking books, cards, games, portable DVD player on trips anymore.

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Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

?

LongAce wrote:

as my main GPS for my car, but it lacks some of the basic functions such as turn by turn road voice prompts. The ease of doing a quick search without cops thinking that I'm texting is a big concern as well.

My droid Prevail has turn by turn voice and it also has voice to text, voice search, voice email, and voice dialing so I don't have to fidget with it while driving and worry about a possible infraction. Instead of pushing several buttons on my Nuvi to find POI's, favorites, etc, all I do is push one button, tell it what I'm looking for, and then push the button to navigate to that location. Much, much easier to use. In fact the voice features are really great and a primary reason why I use my smartphone over my PND.

Quote:

What happens when you forget your smartphone or give it to someone else when you need it for directions. Nothing like having a dedicated GPS for your car without trying to plan for it.

I rarely if ever leave home without my cell phone (and I never loan it to someone...) and now I don't have to worry about carrying my PND around with me to avoid theft while my car is parked because I always carry my droid with me.

NP

--
In times of profound change, the learners will inherit the earth while the "learned" find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists...

I've not been out of town

I've not been out of town that much so can't really compare on trips - I'd probably still take the Garmin for the moment. However in town when I'm just going somewhere I'm not familiar with then I don't bother with the Garmin anymore, the apps on the phone are plenty adequate for that.

Luckily the 760 is working fine when I do use it, if I had to make a choice about a replacement right now I don't know which way I'd go, unless I found a really, really good deal with lifetime maps and traffic then I'd probably just go with the phone.

Not happening

For the same reason as ahsumtoy's (over 45yo eyesight!) a smart phone isn't an option for me either.

But, also like ahsumtoy, I bought a 10" tablet with gps just to see if it might be a viable option. Haven't used it in the car yet but without a huge console or a co-pilot it's a bit unwieldy in a car. No issues with seeing it/display size though! razz

--
It's about the Line- If a line can be drawn between the powers granted and the rights retained, it would seem to be the same thing, whether the latter be secured by declaring that they shall not be abridged, or that the former shall not be extended.

Don't see it happening

I don't see a smartphone doing what my 60CSx does.

Therefore, no way. I don't leave my GPS behind, or favor my iPhone for navigation.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

re:

nuvic320 wrote:
LongAce wrote:

as my main GPS for my car, but it lacks some of the basic functions such as turn by turn road voice prompts. The ease of doing a quick search without cops thinking that I'm texting is a big concern as well. What happens when you forget your smartphone or give it to someone else when you need it for directions. Nothing like having a dedicated GPS for your car without trying to plan for it.

What phone do you have? Android phones has turn by turn voice prompts.

I usually give my standalone GPS to others to use.

I have an iphone. Do you have to pay for the service with the turn by turn voice or are you just using the google map and the voice is built into the android?

free

LongAce wrote:

I have an iphone. Do you have to pay for the service with the turn by turn voice or are you just using the google map and the voice is built into the android?

Turn by turn voice is totally free on Android, built into Google Maps (Android version). It's one of the many reasons I like Android better than iPhone.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

60-series handheld vs. smartphone

diesel wrote:

I don't see a smartphone doing what my 60CSx does.

Can you flesh this idea out a bit? My 60cx has been almost completely supplanted by smartphone apps. I love it, but don't find myself reaching for it as often.

Other than quasi-weatherproofing I can't think of anything I can't do with apps.

Freeware geobeagle for caching
CoPilot for Nav
GPS tools for GPS data and config

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US-only CoPilot + android Optimus T = cheap, effective nav http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/gps/

Industrial Design

First and foremost I think the industrial design of the 60CSx and its intended purpose is superior to nav on a smartphone. The hardware and software of the 60CSx are very closely integrated. It is incredibly easy to use, especially going from app to app.

The other thing is I often have the 60CSx hanging off a carabiner, on a bike, hanging off a back pack, etc. Would you ever do that with an Optimus T? Cell phone handsets have water detectors so they can decline warranty claims.

Another is that the 60CSx is not reliant on the cell system in that it has all data I need, such as POI, businesses, lodging, emergency services, etc. and none of it needs a cell phone system. That self-reliance is important since I can regularly be in areas with no cell service. How many smartphones can be loaded with the entire database equivalent of CN, TOPO 2008 and National Parks? A smartphone didn't work when I was climbing Mt. Washington, but the 60CSx did. Many times I went to use my iPhone for nav, data, etc. only to find I didn't have service and had to resort to my autonomous and self-contained 60CSx. I do realize that smartphones are making progress in this area, but the dedicated GPSr is still far ahead. And it's not just the mapping, it's the database information too.

I have an iPhone, very well done with respect to industrial design, but it is a fixed hardware design with a plethora of applications. As good as the iPhone is, it is still a compromise to try to be all things to all people all the time. And this goes for the 'droids, et al. And it is also why the smartphones will never be quite as good as a device that is specifically designed for a particular function.

When I first got my iPhone, I found myself using it in place of the 60CSx for a little while, but after a while, the iPhone just didn't cut it. It didn't have all that the 60Csx does, particularly the user experience, or usability. Keep in mind that it's not just the hardware, but the software, and I have CN, TOPO 2008 and National Parks mapping/ databases, and tons of POI on my 60CSx, and it is all accessible regardless of the cell phone system. The database info is very important.

Now if somebody can take the functionality of a Garmin 60CSx, or Montana, and add iPhone capability to it without stepping on the GPS functionality, that would be very cool.

The cell phone market relies on turnover, that is people replacing the units every year or so. I'm amazed at how many cell phones I have/had in my basement. I never realized I had so many. The cell phone system/services advanced and left the handsets in the dust, or the handsets just crapped out. The entry market for GPS units is pretty much the same, with availability of most models being discontinued before the blink of an eye. I have one unit, a pretty good one, that does is it all for me, and I've had it since it was released some 6 years or so ago, which is several lifetimes in normal GPS years. When I see people with 2 or 3 units, and then the map licenses for each, I realize I made the right decision, and ended up with the lowest cost option.

There is no way a smartphone handset will do what my 60CSx has done for me these last 6 years. No way.

For those that use your GPS for auto nav, which is probably the overwhelming majority of users, a smartphone can probably offset a dedicated GPSr.

But for my usage, it's not happening. I need an autonomous and dedicated nav device that has better environmental resistance than a smartphone handset.

We'll see how autonomous smartphones become, and how mapping and databases that could enable autonomous smartphones are linked to the device or user, and how that affects things. And then there is the industrial design aspect and the integration of all these functions and how functionality is compromised by trying to be-all-things-to-all-people-all-the-time.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

I don't believe phones are

I don't believe phones are ready for prime time. The programs are getting better but PND's are still the way to go.

yep

gadget_man wrote:

I don't believe phones are ready for prime time. The programs are getting better but PND's are still the way to go.

I agree with that statement

I agree!

I agree!

Who Has Left Their PND Behind And Just Used Their Smartphone

They will pass a law that will prohibit using Smartphone as a GPS like they did for texting. You simply can't drive and look at that small screen without taking your eyes off the road. Even if you have voice telling you where to go, you will try to look at that small screen.

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3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

what I think

rthibodaux wrote:

They will pass a law that will prohibit using Smartphone as a GPS like they did for texting. You simply can't drive and look at that small screen without taking your eyes off the road. Even if you have voice telling you where to go, you will try to look at that small screen.

Well if Diesel says the screen size on his 60CSx @ 1.5" x 2.2" is capable for navigating, surely my iPhone with it's screen size of 2" x 3" is capable for navigating.

--
If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Not Me

I still use my PND as I do not have a "SmartPhone". I still use and old Motorola V360. I do have an iPod Touch 4 and an iPad 2 but neither has 3G service. If/when I decide to go with data service, it will probably be for a MiFi type device so I can tether all my gadgets on one account.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

a tool for the job

I can second Diesel's remarks. I've seen my GPSmap 76csx bounce off rocks and float on the ocean. Sometimes you just need a tool built for the job. Same reason for having a Nuvi in my car. It's always there, displaying a map of my current location, wherever I go.

Droid works great but ...

My Droid works great with the google maps, but it will never replace the Garmin. The Droid plugs into the stereo and plays Pandora and the Garmin stays as a dedicated GPS! Also if you loose 3g you loose the maps with the Droid.

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Nuvi 250W, Nuvi 265W, Nuvi 1350T, Rooted Droid

Not exactly....

rcfx wrote:

My Droid works great with the google maps, but it will never replace the Garmin. The Droid plugs into the stereo and plays Pandora and the Garmin stays as a dedicated GPS! Also if you loose 3g you loose the maps with the Droid.

The latest Google Maps update allows you to cache the maps to your Droid. Also, Navigon, Co-pilot and other Droid apps store the maps on your smartphone so you can still navigate just fine without 3G...

NP

--
In times of profound change, the learners will inherit the earth while the "learned" find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists...

I see!

Got co-pilot, and I did not know about the latest google maps, must be the 5.7, Thanks! I'll try it!

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Nuvi 250W, Nuvi 265W, Nuvi 1350T, Rooted Droid

Google Maps is up to version

Google Maps is up to version 5.8 as of today.

google maps won't download maps along a route

My android Google Maps v5.6 will only save tiles of selected 10 mile squares, not of all the tiles along the route. Also, I sometimes change the route while traveling, requiring access to more map information. Perhaps I'm missing something. I've read that v5.7 has the same limitation.

Use POI-Factory files with Google Navigator

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

iPhone

I have used the Maps app on my iPhone a few times. It is ok and the directions are adequate, but the screen is small and the map grid is quite confined.

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RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

True, But...

rkf wrote:

I have used the Maps app on my iPhone a few times. It is ok and the directions are adequate, but the screen is small and the map grid is quite confined.

...for short trips (when I fly somewhere and rent a car), I find it more convenient to just use my Android with Google Maps than to pack my GO930, gooseneck and beanbag mount. Also, the last few time I did take my GO930, I've had to take my beanbag mount out of my bag and run it through the x-ray separately when going through security...more hassle.

Shooter

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go

Iphone & Garmin 3790

I use my IPhone for minor location lookups but I have not seen a phone that will replace my Garmin 3790 anytime soon.

I guess this says a lot

I guess this says a lot about me but I ALWAYS take both....(Mr.Back-up).

don't have smartphone

I personally find smartphones too expensive for the data plans, so chalk me up for staying with my Garmin 850. It is not very big, costs nothing to use it as much as I want (after the initial purchase price).

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___________________ Garmin 2455, 855, Oregon 550t

I can't just rely on just

I can't just rely on just using my iphone because of cell service and data usage. I was in a situation last week when I was visiting Manhattan, Kansas and had to find Trotter Hall in Kansas State University. The Garmin was able to find the front entrance to K-State, but could not find Trotter Hall. Since I was the passenger, I took out the iphone and used the map app and typed in Trotter Hall and it found it right away... good thing because we had to get there in time for the grad student orientation. So, for me I will have to use both PND and smartphone

Who Has Left Their PND Behind And Just Used Their Smartphone?

I sort of have. I have a Garmin Nuvifone G60 that I used as a phone and GPS for a while, but then I moved up to the Garminfone (Garmin Nuvifone A50). As a result, I simply leave the Garmin Nuvifone in my pickup all of the time just like you would a regular vehicle GPS. The benefit of this is is is a backup phone, if I ever would need it, and because I leave a T-Mobile pre-paid SIM card in it, I am usually able to use YellowPages.com on it. I have tried using the Garminfone as a GPS, phone, and Slacker Radio player, but for me it ends up being too much. For example, if I am navigating somewhere and I get a phone call, it interrupts the navigation. Now when I am horseback riding, for example, it is great. I am able to have the Garminfone with in case I get a call, I can listen to Slacker Radio or the audio from Dish Remote Access. If I would need GPS or the camera, they are right there with me. I suspect in the future, when we add another vehicle for out family, I just might leave the Garminfone as a de facto GPS in the new vehicle and buy myself another smartphone. I might also be inclined to get another T-Mobile prepaid SIM card for the Garminfone, just to see what I can do with that. I think my next Android phone will be a Motorola Defy. I bought one for my son this summer and it seems to be a great phone. I will probably add Co-Pilot for Android, unless Garmin ever finally adds an Android application.

As a side note, I have given some serious thought to getting a used Motorola Droid, adding Co-Pilot on it, and just using it as a GPS. I figure that way I can get the optional windshield mount, use it daily as a GPS, and add some pre-paid minutes from Page Plus Cellular. I think that since I have GSM phones now, having a backup phone on CDMA (Verizon) I should be pretty well prepared!

My PND's Mostly Given Away

I only have a couple PND's left. One Magellan Roadmate that's finding another home soon, and my Garmin Nuvi and finally the Lowrance XOG (Cross Over GPS) used for lakes.

I've used my iPhone almost exclusively for a couple of years now while traveling both domestic and abroad, using Tom-Tom and Co-Pilot apps. The Garmin PND is still in use because of the ability to use POI's. The Lowrance will most likely find another home if/when I purchase the available lake maps for the iPhone.

My Windows Phone 7 just isn't there yet, so I wouldn't use that for navigation, and I'll be getting an android to play with in the near future and know there are good options available to use that.

--
And now, back to your regularly scheduled forum - already in progress . . .

Sub For Your Lowrance

Airbrushed wrote:

The Lowrance will most likely find another home if/when I purchase the available lake maps for the iPhone.

Would you use your iPhone on the lake?

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go

Did It Again in Yellowstone NP

Following a conference my wife and I attended in Salt Lake City, we went on a 3-day bus tour of Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons. Since I wasn't going to be driving anyway, I didn't take my GO930.

However, it was very nice having Google Maps available to answer the "How long until we get there?" questions. Another nice feature with the new Google Maps (I'm not sure when this became available, so it was "new" to me) is the "Terrain" feature available under "Layers". That lets you see the elevation, which on this trip, was pretty high (max of ~7740 ft MSL). It also helped answer questions such as "What lake is that, etc." when the tour guide was busy talking to other folks on the bus. All-in-all, it was very nice having it available and I was surprised at the cell phone coverage over most of the trip.

Shooter

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Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go

Double GPS

We use both a GPS and our smartphone. Both are good, but the nice thing about having a separate GPS and a smartphone is being able to use the phone while you are driving to some place where you need directions.

iphone

Iphone with GPS Drive app works during my trips when I did not bring my regular GPS.

I use the phone only now.

I use the phone only now. Less to carry. Only time I had to think twice was a recent trip to ME. Portland to Bangor I was told by local contact had some holes for Verizon in between. But highway should be fine and it was.

GPS for Flights

I have an iPhone, loaded with GPS apps. But besides basic car navigation, I love to use GPS in my airline seat.

With the iPhone, I have had no luck locking on a signal while in 'airplane' mode. Window seat, unit to the glass...I have TomTom, Garmin, GPS Drive, Maps, and others, but nolo. Nothing. So I kind of gave up.

However, when United changed its policies to allow passengers to use handheld GPS, I bought a 3490. Full bars, perfect tracking, perfect mapping, 100% awesome.

4 hours battery is enough for most of my flights. For longer ones, I use the Trent iCruiser power pack. Works perfectly with the 3490, and provides enough juice that the unit sees it as 'power,' not as 'PC connect.'

Something wonderful about seeing your elevation as 35,000 feet, and your speed as 630 MPH.

And, something even better about seeing a lazy river with a sweeping bend, and a community on its banks, and knowing what it is - so you could someday visit it by car.

In this one regard - a PND wins.

Use the phone a lot, but

Use the phone a lot, but until I am able to load custom poi categories with sound alerts (need RLC since I live in Chicago) I'll stick with a PND. Just managed to kill my Nuvi attempting to change battery (tore one of the cables) so I guess I'll start hunting for a similar size Garmin.

Desert rat

I go too many places that don't have adequate cell coverage. Having said that, I mostly use my G2 droid and it works great. Voice turn by turn, and always updated maps.

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Wherever you go, there you are. -Garmin Nuvi 370

Smartphones often Overheat

Another issue: I've had bad luck with smartphones as my primary GPS - in the summer.

If you put an iPhone in a windshield cradle, on a sunny day with the sunshine hitting it, it will often overheat to the point of shutting down. A yellow warning triangle appears in the window saying 'Temperature! The iPhone needs to cool down before you can use it.'

Also, with the iPhone and Droid X, navigating on a long trip, you will often find the GPS app draws more power than the 12V power can provide - so you work on kind of 'assisted battery power...' meaning it drains over time, even when plugged in.

I've had trips with both, starting with a full battery, and over 6-7 hours, it drains to zero...and turns off.

Again, this happens more on hot summer days. But I have never had the temperature or battery drain issue with any of my dedicated GPS units, whether Garmin or Tom Tom.

I will still use my GPS for

I will still use my GPS for a while.

--
GPSmap76Cx handheld, Nuvi 2557LMT, Nuvfi 2598LMTHD

My Android phone is a decent emergency backup

I have tried using my Android phone for navigation purposes, and it fails on several fronts:

1) Cell Coverage
2) Data Charges
3) Battery life/charge rate in car (slowly discharges while plugged in due to low charge acceptance because of heat with display usage and sitting in direct sunlight)
4) Much smaller screen
5) UI not as convenient for vehicle usage

That said, when I have forgotten my PND or loaned it to my wife, I have successfully used the phone as an emergency backup. I would just never want to use it as the primary navigation device.

I might me old school, but I still prefer some of my single function devices instead of their multifunction alternatives. After a day of web surfing, ebook reading, game playing, mp3 listening, and navigating; I would be afraid of finding my multifunction device without a charge (see #3 above) and not be able to use it as a phone when I needed one.

This doesn't mean that I don't have and use the various apps on the phone, I just use them sparingly. They are a complement to my single function devices, not a replacement.

.

If I were flying to a city (assuming good cell phone coverage) and not planning to rent a car or do any serious driving while there, I'd leave the PND behind. Especially if trying to travel light.

If I were driving to the other place I'd definitely take the PND.

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