Why old farts need to be tested every year

 

http://tinyurl.com/69yvaj8

Elderly See Pedestrians Half as Often as Younger Drivers, According to New Research.

As I said in another post I am 63 and have no problem being tested when I am 65.

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”
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Now, add to that fray some mental infirmity, medications, not wearing their eye glasses etc, and you have a recipe for disaster.

It's hard enough to keep aware in high traffic levels for those with a sharp lookout, as there's often incredible amounts of information to process immediately.

My mom is getting to this point in life for the above reasons. She's terrified to lose her license.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Reaction time

We elderly folk do not react as quickly as the younger, but we make up for that with experience and self-preservation techniques, such as slowing down and keeping a safe distance.
The games that test reaction time are fun. I am consistent with pushing a button when the light flashes at .26 seconds. Years ago I could do it in .19.

--
1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

got you beat

am 75 and driving great. But sometimes I get double vision of people crossing the street, I just head the car between them. Have'nt hit anyone yet.

Licenses

Juggernaut wrote:

...

My mom is ... terrified to lose her license.

I believe you'll find that fear of losing one's license really translates into fear of losing one's freedom.

--
"It's not where you start, but where you end up." Where am I and what am I doing in this hand basket?

.

Precisely. Perhaps more to the point, one's independence, and self-reliance.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Freedom

Yes, my dad's been dead 26 years, but I still remember the day I took him for his last driver's test and he failed. He was born in 1908 and was driving before there was even a license bureau. He said, "Son, I lost my freedom today and ability to get around at will." It really got to him, and now that I'm older, I can appreicate that more so than the day it happened.

Hopefully technology can

Hopefully technology can come to the rescue in the future, with self-driving cars.

--
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Elderly Drivers' Ability to Detect Hazards Doesn't Degrade

Another article from the same researchers:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100526111238.ht...

Statistics are right about 50% of the time. The other half is a coin flip.

--
Zumo 550 & Zumo 665 My alarm clock is sunshine on chrome.

.

dave817 wrote:

Another article from the same researchers:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100526111238.ht...

Statistics are right about 50% of the time. The other half is a coin flip.

Truly, junk science at it's best.

The sample was too small to draw any sort of valid conclusion.

My father turns 91 this year and is living independently - he is in very good condition, given his age, though he says he can't play golf anymore because it is too much walking . . . . riding as a passenger in his car is truly a white knuckle experience (witness the time he became confused while driving on a busy portion of the I95 and simply stopped while in the fast lane 'to get his bearings'. I was an unwilling passenger during that event).

He was retested on his 90th - he failed the first time because he was driving too slow. He is hard of hearing and very far-sighted. The fact that he couldn't make out the details of the dash and speedometer notwithstanding, just the fact that there are no body parts on his car unscarred from 'minor touches' should have been adequate proof that he wasn't sufficiently capable of driving safely.

Yet they tested him (two testers) and said he met their minimum standards.

He had been resigned to losing his license after the first failure (which didn't actually stop him from driving while awaiting his retest), but was very relieved when he was approved to terrorize the roads again.

Living in the 'big city' and given the cost of driving (huge insurance premiums and a large capital investment in the vehicle, it's maintenance and the cost of his parking spot), I'm not sure that this 'loss of freedom' is real - there are taxis everywhere and parking is no longer an issue.

--
Currently have: SP3, GPSMAP 276c, Nuvi 760T, Nuvi 3790LMT, Zumo 660T

Other Drivers Needing Retesting

One of the biggest challenges I encounter with driving is young females talking on the cell phone. Just yesterday I had one pass me on a double line and almost went head on into oncoming traffic. She was jabbering away on her cell phone with an elementary age child riding shotgun without any type of booster seat. Unfortunately for her there was a deputy parked in someone's driveway who witnessed the whole thing. He made his way through traffic and stopped this careless driver.

Time Compression

spokybob wrote:

We elderly folk do not react as quickly as the younger, but we make up for that with experience and self-preservation techniques, such as slowing down and keeping a safe distance.
The games that test reaction time are fun. I am consistent with pushing a button when the light flashes at .26 seconds. Years ago I could do it in .19.

Years ago I figured out a theory that the we develop time compression as we age.

Remember, as a teenager, how long a school day was and how far away the weekend was? Then, as a working stiff, the work day did not seem as long? And I believe that that many elderly drivers see the world whizzing by them, and doing 45 mph down the highway is like being in a NASCAR race!

It's all about time flying by.

Elderly Drivers

I'm nearing 65 and can drive fine but notice the difference between how well I see things especially at night. I think that after age 25, the amount of time it takes the eye to adjust to light changes starts to increase. I just got a renewal of drivers liscense for 8 years (in NC) with only an eye test. I think that testing should be more often than that once one hits 65.

--
John

See It To

My soon to be 73 year old mother is showing signs of driving impairment too. Usually if I am going somewhere with her, I drive her vehicle for her. Less fear on my part. Also her car every once in a while has a new "ding" or some other kind of damage.

Recently I noticed her front license plate crumpled a bit and the lower front spoiler was detached. She saw it and said someone must have hit her. Knowing how she drives I told her she did it and explained how. She will pull into a parking spot and instead of stopping, she keeps creeping up ever further until she hits something. In this case, she had parked in a lot where there were piles of frozen snow in the spaces and pulling in she smashed into it. She uses the "crunch" to tell her to stop pulling in.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

Advantage

spokybob wrote:

We elderly folk do not react as quickly as the younger, but we make up for that with experience and self-preservation techniques, such as slowing down and keeping a safe distance.
The games that test reaction time are fun. I am consistent with pushing a button when the light flashes at .26 seconds. Years ago I could do it in .19.

Another advantage the older folks I know has is they don't drive around with a cell phone glued to their ear or sending text messages while driving.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Said with a smile....

Double Tap wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/69yvaj8

Elderly See Pedestrians Half as Often as Younger Drivers, According to New Research.

As I said in another post I am 63 and have no problem being tested when I am 65.

Remember, there is always (at least) two in an accidents. Pedestrians, drivers, bicycles, trucks etc:

Take care of each other.

We could probably eliminate 95% of all accidents, only allowing the 5% most skilled in the traffic! And that will most likely only be females!

That's what we want?

--
Nüvi 765T, Nüvi 1390T, Nüvi 2559 and 2695 LMT, GPS12, GPS18 (used in nRoute and Oziexplorer on laptop), GPSmap76CSx, SonyEricsson X1 (For OziExplorer CE maps)

My dad died in February and

My dad died in February and had stopped driving several years before his death. He was 86. I have been in the car with him when he ran a stoplight. I asked him if he knew he did it and he said no. Scary. Where he lived, there is not really a way to get around other than drive. Taxis are nearly non-existant. His wife was a little better than him. They avoided rush hour and drove as little as possible. Fortunately they did not have wrecks.

Younger drivers take their abilities for granted and do things that un-necessarily add risk. I am 55 which I used to think was pretty old. My autocross times are not at the low end of the club I occasionally race against but they are not the worst either. I don't think I scare my kids as much as they scare me. But my time is coming. I do have more trouble concentrating on multiple things at the same time than I think I used to. I will talk on the phone while driving but I use my Garmins in bluetooth mode to do it and I will pull over if there is heavy traffic.

Greater wisdom and willingness to admit a diminished skill set often comes with age. But at some point, I think we need to be prepared to move to a retirement center or something so we can eliminate, or nearly eliminate driving. I have not been a passenger with anybody in their late 70s or 80s that I really want to ride with. That will be me in 20 years.

Jim

the Time has come to hang up your keys

lajammer wrote:

am 75 and driving great. But sometimes I get double vision of people crossing the street, I just head the car between them. Have'nt hit anyone yet.

Now that's scary, your keywords are:
1.) haven't
2.) yet

If your seeing double, you have problems. Get yourself fixed before your keywords change to something you don't want to live with, or someone doesn't get live.

If your post was to get a rise and not true, which I hope is true, then never-mind!

--
Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

and we are not OLD FARTS

We are Old Pharts.
I'm pushing 75 in a couple of months. Yes, reaction time is down a tad but I compensate for that by driving AT the speed limit, not talking on the cell phone and keeping more distance behind cars. I still signal truckers when they can pull in safely.
Have to go for an eye test to renew my license next week but I had cataract surgery 4 years ago and my vision, especially for night driving, is better than it was 25 years ago.
I guess the key is knowing your limitations and drive within your limits. And don't overdo - we limit our driving to about 500 miles per day on long distance drives - and pull over and take a power nap if we start to feel tired. Maybe that's why I maintain the Rest Areas file.
I'm sure in a few years we'll have to re-evaluate our situation.

--
MrKenFL- "Money can't buy you happiness .. But it does bring you a more pleasant form of misery." NUVI 260, Nuvi 1490LMT & Nuvi 2595LMT all with 2014.4 maps !

We're Safe Drivers

Senior citizens are generally safe drivers. We may suffer from certain ailments, but most of us drive the speed limit, stop at stop signs and red lights, don't text message while driving, and use seat belts. One good indication of safe driving statistics is the cost of auto insurance. Teenagers and young singles pay far more for insurance than I do. Overall we're a bit wiser, understand the responsibilities of driving better, and are much more aware of our limitations, and compensate for them. And yes, ever so often we do have auto accidents. When that happens, it's most always blamed on our age, rather than considering actual circumstances.

My 2 cents worth.

--
Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

And yet

Keeping track of 30 bingo cards is a breeze...

Rath *scared of bingo halls*

--
Garmin 1390T X1 & 50LM

Wouldn't know

Never played Bingo

--
MrKenFL- "Money can't buy you happiness .. But it does bring you a more pleasant form of misery." NUVI 260, Nuvi 1490LMT & Nuvi 2595LMT all with 2014.4 maps !

Hmmm!

BobDee wrote:

[quote=lajammer
But sometimes I get double vision of people crossing the street, I just head the car between them. Have'nt hit anyone yet.

Now that's scary, your keywords are:
1.) haven't
2.) yet

If your seeing double, you have problems. Get yourself fixed before your keywords change to something you don't want to live with, or someone doesn't get live.

If your post was to get a rise and not true, which I hope is true, then never-mind!

I am beginning to believe that you are one of those unfortunate people who don't have a sense of humor BobDee. I took his post as humor the moment I read it.

Priorities & judgment change with aging

I've seen this with my parents and in-laws: when people are in their 60s, they'll say they will give up the keys when the time comes, but when they reach the point that their younger relatives feel "It's time," growing reluctance to give up driving often overrides their better judgment and skill self-assessment. They go into denial about what others can plainly see. The loss of freedom is just too painful to many. Not all, but many.

--
JMoo On

It's interesting to note

It's interesting to note that... if a 20 year old plows into a bunch of people while drunk, it's in the local news, if a 26 year old drives through the front of a store while high on meth it's in the local news.... but if an 80 year old does either of those, it's on the national news and every 80 year old is now a risky driver.

ps... I'm not 80, only a youngster at 65 smile

--
Rick Long Las Vegas, NV Garmin 855

Old Farts

ke6tao wrote:

It's interesting to note that... if a 20 year old plows into a bunch of people while drunk, it's in the local news, if a 26 year old drives through the front of a store while high on meth it's in the local news.... but if an 80 year old does either of those, it's on the national news and every 80 year old is now a risky driver.

ps... I'm not 80, only a youngster at 65 smile

In an article in today's newspaper it says 63% of drivers under 30 are distracted drivers,texting,talking on cell phone.

The Difference

Yeah the kids have us at a disadvantage. They have learned it all by now and we have just realized that we learn something new everyday. It is either because we forgot most of it or we have just seen fit to make more room for all that knowledge which is till out there to learn.

amen

panama wrote:

One of the biggest challenges I encounter with driving is young females talking on the cell phone. Just yesterday I had one pass me on a double line and almost went head on into oncoming traffic. She was jabbering away on her cell phone with an elementary age child riding shotgun without any type of booster seat. Unfortunately for her there was a deputy parked in someone's driveway who witnessed the whole thing. He made his way through traffic and stopped this careless driver.

It's funny you should mention that. This afternoon while waiting for my wife a girl got in a car parked nose to nose with mine and immediately got her cell phone out and made a call. first she had the phone in her left hand so she could put the car in gear, then she switched it to her right hand so she could steer, back to her left hand so she could put it in drive, then finally back to her right hand and away she went. Hilarious!

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Just Sayin'

Double Tap wrote:

Elderly See Pedestrians Half as Often as Younger Drivers, According to New Research.

That's because we don't aim at them!

--
Garmin nüvi 3597LMTHD, 3760 LMT, & 255LMT, - "Those who wish for fairness without first protecting freedom will end up with neither freedom nor fairness." - Milton Friedman

Elderly drivers

When you get too old to drive, come on down to Florida and you will feel right at home.
We are not known as "Gods waiting room" for nothing!

--
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!

Ahh, yes

Florida. Newlyweds, and Nearly Deads...

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Elderly Drivers

Timantide wrote:

When you get too old to drive, come on down to Florida and you will feel right at home.
We are not known as "Gods waiting room" for nothing!

And the weather is great,80 degrees today.

Florida

St Petersburg... heaven's waiting room.

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

Quad headlights

lajammer wrote:

am 75 and driving great. But sometimes I get double vision of people crossing the street, I just head the car between them. Have'nt hit anyone yet.

That's why people your age drive those old cars with quad headlights.

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

Well, you're obviously driving like a youngster

lajammer wrote:

am 75 and driving great. But sometimes I get double vision of people crossing the street, I just head the car between them. Have'nt hit anyone yet.

Well, you're obviously driving like a youngster, way too fast. Slow down and aim more accurately!

Hmmm

Maybe I should paint cross-hairs on my windshield for greater accuracy?!? laugh out loud

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

I think all drivers could

I think all drivers could make a difference on the road as to safety if they (1)knew the laws, (2)knew how to observe and practice good driving skills (i.e. how to merge, using turn signals when changing lanes, safe following distance, etc), (3) kept a focus on the task at hand, (4) keep your vehicle in safe condition (tires, brakes, vision, etc.) (5) keep fresh (don't over-drive your alert capability.
Personally, I think all drivers, regardless of age should be tested periodically.

--
JD

Aim

That's why I always like the '57 Chevy's rocket launchers. The one on the left served as a site for the driver.

Exactly...

nuvic320 wrote:

Hopefully technology can come to the rescue in the future, with self-driving cars.

I just hope "self-driving" cars don't cost a second mortgage.

My parents live with me and I had to take the keys away from my dad a couple of years ago (he is 75). He used to be a safe driver, but (even after surgery) he doesn't see that well anymore. He almost run on a parked truck while traveling with my mother, so I took the keys away that day (my other car, so yes, I'm entitled to do that razz )

That said, I have a 96 year old neighbor who sees very well and drives her car everywhere. Her reaction time is slow, but she is not one of those people you see barely looking over the dashboard. She drives very safely and keeps her mind active. She mentioned it is the most important thing to live that old: to remain active. I believe her.

We can't put all the elderly on the same boat. Some should be taken off the road, others should keep driving. As others mentioned, all drive better than teens with phones.

--
Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.

It ain't necessarily so

Tuckahoemike wrote:

1-Senior citizens are generally safe drivers.
2-We may suffer from certain ailments, but most of us drive the speed limit,
3-stop at stop signs and red lights,
4-don't text message while driving, and
5-use seat belts.
6-One good indication of safe driving statistics is the cost of auto insurance.
7-Teenagers and young singles pay far more for insurance than I do.
8-Overall we're a bit wiser,
9-understand the responsibilities of driving better, and
10-are much more aware of our limitations, and 11-compensate for them.
12-And yes, ever so often we do have auto accidents.

13-When that happens, it's most always blamed on our age, rather than considering actual circumstances.

My 2 cents worth.

1- As are most drivers
2- True and that is a problem, most people drive above the speed limit.
3- So do most drivers
4- True
5- Just like most drivers
6- Maybe, insurance cos have had everyone convinced for so long that younger drivers cause greater financial loss that everyone believes it. Yet to my knowledge no studies have been done in decades to back up that position and I asked a few underwriters I know at property and casualty companies about it.
7- True see above
8- Unsubstantiated
9- Unsubstantiated
10- Unsubstantiated
11- Yes by driving 50 on a 65 MPH highway
12- True but more often that you want us to believe and when they do their death rate is much higher
13- You must be kidding with that statement

--
"Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam" “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

Yes.. and In The Left Hand Lane!!

Tuckahoemike wrote:

11-are much more aware of our limitations, and compensate for them.

Double Tap wrote:

11- Yes by driving 50 on a 65 MPH highway

In the left hand lane while holding up at least 20 other vehicles behind you!

Thank God one of our Florida Reps is trying to put a law into affect the would make it a chargeable ticket if someone is blocking faster left lane traffic instead of getting over in the right lane where they belong.

Nuvi1300WTGPS

--
I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

Better Aim

A Mercedes hood ornament makes a nice site.

Cellphones etc.

I agree with Panama. The worst drivers are not the old folks, but the young ones who drive with a cellphone stuck in their ear while they drive. Also, those who feel the need to drive 90 MPH on the Interstate highways and those who don't believe in stopping for redlights. Sometimes, getting behind an elderly person driving slow is a bit frustrating, until you notice that they are doing the speed limit. I know, at some point, we'll all have to give up driving due to age related issues, but perhaps we should also not issue driver licenses to reckless kids.

I'd Support That

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

Thank God one of our Florida Reps is trying to put a law into affect the would make it a chargeable ticket if someone is blocking faster left lane traffic instead of getting over in the right lane where they belong.

That is the law on the Autobahn; Keep right except to pass. I am perfectly comfortable hanging out with the pack in the right lane and cruising at whatever speed keeps me well separated from the car in front and behind. If I really want to break out of the pack, then I like having the option to pull into the left lane, pass a few cars and get back in lane. That is modus operandi when I drive stretches on the New York State Thruway. Here on Long Island, we are three lanes on most of my commute so I tend to stick to the middle lane; let the fast people go on the left and pass the slow people go on the right.

--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

I'd Support That, Too...

Aardvark wrote:
Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

Thank God one of our Florida Reps is trying to put a law into affect the would make it a chargeable ticket if someone is blocking faster left lane traffic instead of getting over in the right lane where they belong.

That is the law on the Autobahn; Keep right except to pass. I am perfectly comfortable hanging out with the pack in the right lane and cruising at whatever speed keeps me well separated from the car in front and behind. If I really want to break out of the pack, then I like having the option to pull into the left lane, pass a few cars and get back in lane. That is modus operandi when I drive stretches on the New York State Thruway. Here on Long Island, we are three lanes on most of my commute so I tend to stick to the middle lane; let the fast people go on the left and pass the slow people go on the right.

and I live in FL! I'm getting closer to "old fart" status and I would welcome these changes.

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

I'm with you!

Gary A wrote:

and I live in FL! I'm getting closer to "old fart" status and I would welcome these changes.

Just get over.... I got onto my daughter yesterday for just riding in the left lane on the Expressway.

--
BMW Nav V Montana 650 Zumo 660 Garmin 78S Garmin 76CSX

Old Fart

Let me put a monkey wrench into some of this thought process.
Unless there is a special place I do not know of in the USA, the speed limit is the same in all lanes so I cannot be charged for driving to slow in the left lane if I am doing the limit and as far as I know there is no law saying I have to move over to let someone else break the law. I do have to move over for emergency vehicles but that is as far as it goes.
In the city I never drive in the right lane because of all the cars entering and leaving the freeway.
Since Toyota had a Prius contest several years ago and a lady won by driving the city course at 79mpg, when I drive from one end of the city to the other I try to see how good my mileage is. So far following the speed limits, the best was 67mpg. I just pretend there is an egg under the gas pedal.
When I was younger I did rear end a 87 year old lady at 60mph while she told the police officer she pulled out in front of me because she did not see my bright red car and was doing 15mph.

I agree

spullis wrote:

I agree with Panama. The worst drivers are not the old folks, but the young ones who drive with a cellphone stuck in their ear while they drive. Also, those who feel the need to drive 90 MPH on the Interstate highways and those who don't believe in stopping for redlights. Sometimes, getting behind an elderly person driving slow is a bit frustrating, until you notice that they are doing the speed limit. I know, at some point, we'll all have to give up driving due to age related issues, but perhaps we should also not issue driver licenses to reckless kids.

the ones who should be tested more frequently are teh ones that get ticketed and/or have accidents.

Controversy

kurzemnieks wrote:

Let me put a monkey wrench into some of this thought process.
Unless there is a special place I do not know of in the USA, the speed limit is the same in all lanes so I cannot be charged for driving to slow in the left lane if I am doing the limit and as far as I know there is no law saying I have to move over to let someone else break the law. I do have to move over for emergency vehicles but that is as far as it goes.
In the city I never drive in the right lane because of all the cars entering and leaving the freeway.
Since Toyota had a Prius contest several years ago and a lady won by driving the city course at 79mpg, when I drive from one end of the city to the other I try to see how good my mileage is. So far following the speed limits, the best was 67mpg. I just pretend there is an egg under the gas pedal.
When I was younger I did rear end a 87 year old lady at 60mph while she told the police officer she pulled out in front of me because she did not see my bright red car and was doing 15mph.

Let the controversy begin...

Watch the video from tonight's newscast:

arrow http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/article/181478/8/Proposed-law...

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/handbook/section2.

kurzemnieks wrote:

Let me put a monkey wrench into some of this thought process.
Unless there is a special place I do not know of in the USA, the speed limit is the same in all lanes so I cannot be charged for driving to slow in the left lane if I am doing the limit and as far as I know there is no law saying I have to move over to let someone else break the law. I do have to move over for emergency vehicles but that is as far as it goes.
In the city I never drive in the right lane because of all the cars entering and leaving the freeway.
Since Toyota had a Prius contest several years ago and a lady won by driving the city course at 79mpg, when I drive from one end of the city to the other I try to see how good my mileage is. So far following the speed limits, the best was 67mpg. I just pretend there is an egg under the gas pedal.
When I was younger I did rear end a 87 year old lady at 60mph while she told the police officer she pulled out in front of me because she did not see my bright red car and was doing 15mph.

Freeway driving
Driving along a freeway

Once on the freeway, a safe driver travels at a steady speed, looking forward and anticipating what's going to happen on the road ahead. Traffic should keep to the right, using the left lanes for passing.

As in city driving, your eyes should be constantly moving, scanning the road ahead, to each side and behind. Look ahead to where you are going to be in the next 15 to 20 seconds, or as far ahead as you can see, when you travel at faster speeds. Remember to keep scanning and check your mirrors frequently.

Stay clear of large vehicles. Because of their size, they block your view more than other vehicles. Leave space around your vehicle. This will let you see clearly in every direction and will give you time and space to react.

Be careful not to cut off any vehicle, large or small, when making a lane change or joining the flow of traffic. It is dangerous and illegal for a slower moving vehicle to cut in front of a faster moving vehicle.

Use the far left lane of a multi-lane freeway to pass traffic moving slower than the speed limit, but don't stay there. Drive in the right-hand lane when possible. On many freeways with three or more lanes in each direction, large trucks cannot travel in the far left lane and must use the lane to the right for passing. Get into the habit of driving in the right lane, leaving the other lanes clear for passing.

--
All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players. Rush

I'm in a special place.....

kurzemnieks wrote:

Let me put a monkey wrench into some of this thought process.
Unless there is a special place I do not know of in the USA, the speed limit is the same in all lanes so I cannot be charged for driving to slow in the left lane if I am doing the limit and as far as I know there is no law saying I have to move over to let someone else break the law. I do have to move over for emergency vehicles but that is as far as it goes.
In the city I never drive in the right lane because of all the cars entering and leaving the freeway.
Since Toyota had a Prius contest several years ago and a lady won by driving the city course at 79mpg, when I drive from one end of the city to the other I try to see how good my mileage is. So far following the speed limits, the best was 67mpg. I just pretend there is an egg under the gas pedal.
When I was younger I did rear end a 87 year old lady at 60mph while she told the police officer she pulled out in front of me because she did not see my bright red car and was doing 15mph.

I live in this special place in the USA that you do not know about, it is call Pennsylvania.

Chapter 33, Subchapter A S3301. Driving on Right Side of Roadway.
A. General rule -- Upon all roadways of sufficient width, a vehicle shall be driven upon the right half of the roadway except as follows: (paraphrasing here, exceptions are only for passing and making left turns).

B. Vehicle proceeding at less than normal speed --(note, this does NOT state speed limit).

Upon all roadways any vehicle proceeding at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall be driven in the right hand lane then available for traffic, or as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway, except when overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction or when preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into an alley, private road or driveway.

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Streetpilot C340 Nuvi 2595 LMT
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