CB's

 

Do any of you use a CB while traveling? 40 years ago everyone had one but I don't see them anymore.

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Hillclimber

For cars

lcoon wrote:

Do any of you use a CB while traveling? 40 years ago everyone had one but I don't see them anymore.

They've been replaced with cell phones. You still see a lot installed in OTR rigs, some RVs and fewer cars. I pulled the plug on mine about 20 years ago when all I heard was constant cursing and solicitations for sex. The usefulness of the device was gone, you couldn't get any meaningful reports regarding road conditions and a stock unit couldn't be heard more than about a 1/2 mile because of all the illegal linear amplifiers in use.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

still have mine

Box Car wrote:
lcoon wrote:

Do any of you use a CB while traveling? 40 years ago everyone had one but I don't see them anymore.

They've been replaced with cell phones. You still see a lot installed in OTR rigs, some RVs and fewer cars. I pulled the plug on mine about 20 years ago when all I heard was constant cursing and solicitations for sex. The usefulness of the device was gone, you couldn't get any meaningful reports regarding road conditions and a stock unit couldn't be heard more than about a 1/2 mile because of all the illegal linear amplifiers in use.

I have a small portable walkie talkie style 40 channel Midland, that can be used either on batteries with a "rubber ducky" antenna, or with an optional cig lighter adapter and external antenna adapter, which is how I use mine in my 2002 CR-V.

It is one of those all in one style units where the mike and speaker are one piece. But it has an external mike jack, so I bought an external mike, similar to what you see police officers wear attached to the shoulder. It also has an external speaker jack, so I bought a larger speaker to feed the audio into.

The unit has a belt clip, so with a little ingenuity, I was able to dash mount it, and clip the mike within easy reach.

And I will take one small exception to your point about CB's being replaced by cell phones. While it is true, that the cell phone is now our number one means of communicating in an emergency, there are two advantages that a CB has over a cell phone for general road information.

A CB is a broadcast approach, meaning you don't need to know the number of the person you hope to receive assistance from. If they are in range, they will receive your request. You can only receive assistance on a cell from 911, but not traffic, weather or road conditions from others on the same road, unless you know the number.

Also, cell phones are only as good as the tower locations. CB's work unit to unit, so as long as you are in range, you have a connection.

Just my two cents.

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— (Garmin nuvi 765T) — "people who say money can't buy happiness, don't know where to shop"

Amateur Radio

I use amateur radio, although it limits who you may talk to. But with the variety in radio spectrum you can talk to a car on the highway next to you or have a chat with someone in Europe or Japan while you are on the road. Plus you do not need a cell tower to communicate.

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Will nuvi 265W, Vista HCX, amateur radio

Mine is a carryover

from my days in the Boy Scouts. We were known as the traveling troop. Our troop traveled all over the US, Tenn. Ohio, Colorado, New Mexico, Canada. It was very useful then, and I still have one in my truck. Like Box Car said, all it is now is profanity, but you still get some useful road info. now and then. I am a listener, rarely talk, but still like it.

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"As life runs on, the road grows strange with faces new - and near the end. The milestones into headstones change, Neath every one a friend." - James Russell Lowell Garmin StreetPilot C330, Garmin NUVI 765T, Garmin DriveSmart 60LMT

Yup

have a CB and regularly use it when travelling - particularly in the US (primarily when driving the interstates).

I find it great for warnings of upcoming traffic/construction and other related issues. I do not keep it turned on all the time but I do use it!

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Tom

Since I do

alot of highway driving for my job, I wa thinking of putting one in my van.

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Not doing anything worth a darn.

CBs

CBs were always much better than radar detectors when I was younger and always in a hurry. (As I get older, I drive slower) If the police were using radar guns you were toast. They didn't put it on till you were there. With th CB radio the truckers would tell you where they were, what kind of donuts they were eating and what they were driving.
Now with all of the unmarked cars it is almost impossible to see them. But I agree about the language on them today.

--
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!

GMRS

I have a couple of GMRS radios. I rarely use them but I'll be using them this weekend. I find them more convenient than cell phones when traveling with more than one vehicle. It's easy to talk from car to car without having to call on the cell. We can decide to pull over, hit a rest area, stop to eat, etc.

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GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

You Bet!

cool

Everyday use by us truckers, Cobra 29 LTD is still the KING of the Road. Better than any Radar detector on "ANY GIVEN SUNDAY".
Radar detectors are IL-legal in any Commercial Vehicle! Mostly used now for NOTIFICATION Purpose...
Example: Shipper tells driver to tune to channel 15 and we will let you know what dock door to go in when we are ready to load or unload.

Word of Caution: Expect to hear one of these from anyone at anytime.

(1) Something STUPID!
(2) Something FILTHY!
(3) Something RACIST!

** MOST of the time it's all of the above**

AS a Christian I don't use it unless I Need to, just
keep that in mind.

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"Destination Eternity" Garmin 765T, & Samsung Galaxy Note Edge

I'd rather listen to music

I'd rather ride with music than listen to all that chatter. It's not worth riding 10mph over to be subjected to that chatter torture. 5 over and Free Bird, Give Me Two Steps or Comfortably Numb are much more fun.

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Zumo 550 & Zumo 665 My alarm clock is sunshine on chrome.

I last used one...

30 or so years ago after it got stolen from my car one night. I always kept the car locked until, one night in my driveway, I forgot. I think the next door neighbor's son, who was a pothead, grabbed it. Oh well!!! sad

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It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

Biases!

I don't understand why you think smoking weed is a reason they could be a thief. It could have been the nose picker on the other side of the street. It makes no sense to associate the two activities.

What's next, the old 1930's Reefer Madness evils rehashed?

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Zumo 550 & Zumo 665 My alarm clock is sunshine on chrome.

GMRS Too

thrak wrote:

I have a couple of GMRS radios. I rarely use them but I'll be using them this weekend. I find them more convenient than cell phones when traveling with more than one vehicle. It's easy to talk from car to car without having to call on the cell. We can decide to pull over, hit a rest area, stop to eat, etc.

Last time I had a CB radio in the car was 25 years ago. Today I too use GMRS radios for car-to-car, theme park trips, working on network cables (where someone has to be on the far remote end of a bundle), etc. I've had a valid GMRS license from the start, so the family can legally operate at the GMRS-only frequencies, and at the higher powers (although the vast majority of GMRS users do not bother to get a license).

One in my Jeep

I use one in my jeep on group off-road outings as it is used to keep the group together.

Other than that it is seldom on unless I get a wild hair to do a little SSB work.

I am a Ham Radio Op and have multi-band radios (706's and dedicated 2m / 440 rigs) in all of my vehicles to chat on and pass the time on long trips.

With all of the antenna's on my vehicles lightning usually makes me wide awake (GRIN)

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(formerly known as condump) RV 770 LMT-S, Nuvi2797LMT, Nuvi765T

Well

dave817 wrote:

I don't understand why you think smoking weed is a reason they could be a thief. It could have been the nose picker on the other side of the street. It makes no sense to associate the two activities.

What's next, the old 1930's Reefer Madness evils rehashed?

The nose picking habit doesn't take a lot of cash to do, but the pothead buying illegal drugs needs to support his expensive habit with money somehow.

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If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

If it wasn't for the

If it wasn't for the constant and excessive foul language, I would still use them

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Virgo53 Nuvi 780/265W

CB.

When I was pulling a 5th wheel trailer I had one in my truck. So had my friends I was traveling with. It was good to communicate with them but we stayed on channel 13 what was supposed to be the rv channel. We very seldom went to channel 19, only when we needed some info.

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GPSmap76Cx handheld, Nuvi 2557LMT, Nuvfi 2598LMTHD

I use them for years when

I use them for years when traveling but they have gone the way of the 8 track.It use to be a good hobby and lots of fun before others discovered it and destroyed a good thing.CB users also done a lot of good things for community and for drivers out on the roads.

Our CB club members spent time at rest stops giving out fresh coffee and donuts.Done many community projects.Many clubs done the same thing.It was more then just where Smokey was back then.

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Charlie. Nuvi 265 WT and Nuvi 2597 LMT. Android Here WeGo - Offline Maps & GPS.

Citizen Band, Amateur Radio, GMRS, FRS, MURS, etc.

I, too, had a CB back in the 1970s. Later I became a licensed amateur radio operator. I have used CB, Amateur Radio, GMRS, FRS, and MURS. Ironically, if I want reliable short range communications now with family, I use some old Nextels on Direct Talk. Since they no longer have an active SIM card for the iDen network, I find them to better for me for typical short range, 1/2 mile or less, needs. I can't recall ever getting any interference on Direct Talk. For greater range, a VHF radio programmed for legal, license free frequencies is hard to beat, especially if PL or DPL is used.

I do miss the days of amateur radio when it was fairly easy to come up on a repeater and find a fellow ham that had local information, when traveling. I still have a dual band FM radio in my pickup truck and home, but I no longer have one on my wife's van or my work vehicle any longer.

I recall that the GMRS folks advocated a specific GMRS frequency and PL tone for itinerant traveling. I don't recall hearing any use in my area, but the concept is sound. The idea could be used on MURS, FRS, Ham, etc., sort of like a land version of Marine 16 (a common hailing frequency). In fact, ideally, it could of had a hailing frequency to be used for contact, but switch to a second frequency (and PL tone) for extended contact, again much like U.S. Coast Guard will establish contact on Marine 16, but then switch to Marine 22 to continue conversation. That way Marine 16 remains available for other contact.

Still Have

I still use it on long trips. It's not as useful as in the past but it still can be good for avoiding traffic jams.

--
Bob: My toys: Nüvi 1390T, Droid X2, Nook Color (rooted), Motorola Xoom, Kindle 2, a Yo-Yo and a Slinky. Gotta have toys.

still hve one

I still have a Cobra 40 channel with upper and lower sideband sitting in the basement along with a k-40 antenna. I haven't used it in probably 25 years.

What I take on trips now is an AOR AR 1000XLT scanner that will receive just about any frequency you want to throw at it. I have one channel programed for CB channel 19 and if I run into anything traffic wise I want to know about I listen to the truckers.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Ham Radio--

My radios (more than one depending on which vehicle I'm in) power up automagically along with the GPS and the radar detector when I start up the car.

Usually I'm monitoring popular ham frequencies (on the 2 meter, 144 MHz band -- which one depends on the area I'm in).

I also monitor some public service frequencies. This can be really useful -- get in and start the car and hear the locals calling for multiple tow trucks and emergency vehicles for a pile-up on a local freeway -- it's a good idea to use an alternate route!

Driving through California's Central Valley, it's interesting listening for the highway patrol aircraft. Where are they doing business today?

When I'm in the Jeep, I can receive the traditional CB frequencies. Don't do that very often.

Oh, using these radios -- it's set it and leave it. With the VHF/UHF radios, common frequencies are stored in the radio's memory slots. I can go to priority channels using buttons on the microphone without having to take my eyes off the road. I can also push a button on the mic to have the radio announce what channel/frequency it's on.

When I'm driving, that's the most important thing for me to be doing, and not playing with a radio!

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Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

I still use a CB when driving x-country

birchtree wrote:

Yup, have a CB and regularly use it when travelling - particularly in the US (primarily when driving the interstates).

I find it great for warnings of upcoming traffic/construction and other related issues. I do not keep it turned on all the time but I do use it!

There's a lot of "noise," but I keep the squelch high, and it's still usable for "bear reports" about "smokey!"

What channels are still being used?

jim8650 wrote:

I have a small portable walkie talkie style 40 channel Midland, that can be used either on batteries with a "rubber ducky" antenna, or with an optional cig lighter adapter and external antenna adapter, which is how I use mine in my 2002 CR-V.

It is one of those all in one style units where the mike and speaker are one piece...

I have a GE walkie-talkie style one too, and keep it plugged into my cig lighter "just in case." But I haven't actively been on the radio in 30 years. Sometimes I think I'd like to listen in for a bit on a long drive, but don't even know what channels are most used any more. Anyone have current experience? CH 19? CH 11?

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NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

CB?

CB? What's that? Didn't they go away with the picture-tube TV?

Seriously, we carry a portable unit/antenna in the truck just in case we need help when we're in an area where there's no cell phone coverage. Fortunately, we've never need it ... still in a bag under the seat.

RT

--
"Internet: As Yogi Berra would say, "Don't believe 90% of what you read, and verify the other half."

19 is still the "trucker" channel...

NEOhioGuy wrote:
jim8650 wrote:

I have a small portable walkie talkie style 40 channel Midland, that can be used either on batteries with a "rubber ducky" antenna, or with an optional cig lighter adapter and external antenna adapter, which is how I use mine in my 2002 CR-V.

It is one of those all in one style units where the mike and speaker are one piece...

I have a GE walkie-talkie style one too, and keep it plugged into my cig lighter "just in case." But I haven't actively been on the radio in 30 years. Sometimes I think I'd like to listen in for a bit on a long drive, but don't even know what channels are most used any more. Anyone have current experience? CH 19? CH 11?

...just like in the old days

and channel 9 is for emergency use, though I don't know how many agencies monitor it.

my Midland has another handy feature...it can scan all 40 channels, just like a police scanner does.

sometimes I will set it on that mode, while I am on a long trip, and I am tired of music, podcasts, etc., and just want something different.

I have picked up a base station CB this way from time to time.

I also have a Uniden scanner in my CR-V, again a portable type, making it easy to move in and out of the vehicle. It uses the "rubber ducky" type attenna when used in portable mode, but I have a tripod style, all frequency mag mount scanner antenna that I pop onto the roof for trips. It picks up police, ham, FRS, fire, the usual...also sometimes entertaining for short periods of time.

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— (Garmin nuvi 765T) — "people who say money can't buy happiness, don't know where to shop"

Yes, I still use my CB

I have a portable that I carry in the trunk of my car. Whenever I am on the road and it comes to a grinding halt, I plug it in and listen to the 18 wheelers talk. Usually, some big rig coming the other way is telling other truckers where the problem is and what lane to be in. That's the only time I use it.

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Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

cb's

I have one in my car, and I use one for work. I'm a otr driver. I mostly use it to find out about road hazards, and talking with some of my co-workers. Much has changed in 30+ years when cb's where the in thing.

I've Still Got Mine

Back in the 70's we used a CB every day on our commutes (50 miles each way). Sometime during the 80's I bought a car that it was difficult to find a mounting position for the radio, so to the basement it went. There's a Cobra and a Midland, both still work, or did a year ago when I tested them out. Now I use a handheld scanner, but it's not as much fun as the CB was. Besides the lower frequencies need the longer outside antennas, that the scanner doesn't have.

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Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

I still have mine too

The Hygain V SSB and another generic 40CH are sitting in a box in the garage, along witht he base station 1/4 wave and several 1/4 wave trunk-mount whips.

I still have memories of shooting skip to Spain and Argentina, and the postcards to prove it. It was a lot of fun.

I'm afraid to plug them in. The last time they were on there was so much noise you couldn't hear a local call - and the 11-year sunspot cycle is coming to a peak again. I think I'll wait 7 years until it is quiet and safe to use again LOL

Gonset G11 (Better Known as the) One Eyed Monster

Boy.. are y'all ever bringing back memories. I was one of the very first operators in New York State to obtain a class "D" CB license in the late 50's early 60's.

Call letters were KID-0598 and started out with a Gonset G11 "One Eyed Monster". Later went to a Johnson Messenger and Layfette HE-20c, as well as a Poly Com 4. Even back then the Poly was selling for somewhere around $200.. and was considered the "Caddy" of the mobiles.

It wasn't uncommon for me to be able to make solid contact at a range of around 20 miles.. and that wasn't skip.

At that time it was 23 channels and you just begged to find someone on the air. Also was into HAM radio (call letters started out with K2) in the old Technical class.

Ahhhhh.. them were the good 'ol days! wink

Nuvi1300WTGPS

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I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

CB usage

I still use my CB. As I usually convoy with family and friends who also tune in during a trip.
I rarely use channel 19 though due to language issues

You too

computerperson wrote:

The Hygain V SSB and another generic 40CH are sitting in a box in the garage, along witht he base station 1/4 wave and several 1/4 wave trunk-mount whips.

I still have memories of shooting skip to Spain and Argentina, and the postcards to prove it. It was a lot of fun.

I'm afraid to plug them in. The last time they were on there was so much noise you couldn't hear a local call - and the 11-year sunspot cycle is coming to a peak again. I think I'll wait 7 years until it is quiet and safe to use again LOL

I still have a Yaesu FT-7B with 11 meter crystals in it and a PDL beam that I used to shoot skip with. I was going through some desk drawers the other day and ran across some QSL cards.

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Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

I used to

But once the airwaves were filled with cursing drivers, and people just keying the mike and singing, or playing their radio, it became too much.

It was very nice to use on a trip with others in a different car. Everyone just get on the same channel and you can plan your stops.

But now I use an FRS radio for that. Works perfectly.

C.W. McAll, we hardly knew ye

My CB license was KNHW-3518. I was the galloping ghost.

I cannot remember what I owned, I think it was made by Midland.

you don't hear "handles" much today

ericruby wrote:

My CB license was KNHW-3518. I was the galloping ghost.

I cannot remember what I owned, I think it was made by Midland.

truckers just seem to refer to each other as "driver"

back in the 70's, during the CB craze, when everyone had a handle, a coworker suggested one for me, since I "used" to have a bit of a temper in my youth....heaterhead rolleyes

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— (Garmin nuvi 765T) — "people who say money can't buy happiness, don't know where to shop"

If this van's a rockin' don't keep a knockin'

Tuckahoemike wrote:

Back in the 70's we used a CB every day on our commutes (50 miles each way)... There's a Cobra and a Midland, both still work...

For some reason, mentioning the Cobra reminded me of my U/L SSB Cobra. Maybe it's because that was mounted in my '74 Dodge Ram Van with the big whip antenna and required tennis ball through it mounted on the back bumper. And the shag carpeting throughout, and the captain's chairs, and the murals, etc., etc.

Was a grand, but short time where 'Vanner's ruled (sort of like Disco) and we would be in a convoy of dozens of pimped out (today's term) vans going down the road.

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NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

I Forget The Brand, But

I really liked having all the channel and other controls on the mike while the rest of the unit was mounted out of sight. Somewhere around here it's still boxed up and ready to reinstall since changing vehicles. I just haven't gotten around to doin' that for about the last 20 years or so. redface

Funny thing, though--in the past few years I've been able to resurrect my old CB Handle to use for an ID on GPS-related forums.

CBs were useful because so many other drivers had and used 'em to help each other. Disappointed to hear how the chatter has degraded since the peak years of CB radio usefulness and popularity. A cell phone is handy now days, but definitely not a replacement. Same for FRS radios.