GPS strands couple in forest

 

And then a cell phone with GPS is responsible for their rescue.

It's all the GPS's fault, of course. wink

http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-national/20091228/US.St...

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A number of years ago I went up to Yellowknife NWT in February to do some work for a client. I was handed a set of directions to his facility which unfortuately had a 'left' replaced with a 'right' and, as it happened, there was a 'rural turnnout' at the exact odometer point that was specified in the directions, albeit about 25 miles from the place the author wanted us to be.

I dutifully drove down the 2 lane rut until I got (coincidentally) to the next turnoff, again at the next specified odometer reading and that's where I got stuck . . .

I suppose that since we were heading out to service a transmitter site, the fact that it was in a remote area really wasn't cause for concern until we realized that we were supposed to be within a mile of the destination, the ground was flat and there was no transmitter to be seen.

We managed to back out almost the entire way to the highway, but couldn't make it over the drainage ditch because we couldn't get up enough speed, but a passing 18 wheeler had a tow chain and pulled us the rest of the way.

So sometimes it isn't the driver . . . but those that do things like making U-Turns on interstate highways or drive through barriers advising of a washed out bridge because 'my GPS told me to' have only themselves to blame.

I can just hear my father lecturing me when I was young and had done something stupid because 'someone told me to' . . . "and if he told you to jump of the roof"?

They did it to themselves and their cellphone saved them. Presumably the automatic loccation that cellular systems are mandated to would have been sufficient for a rescue.

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Currently have: SP3, GPSMAP 276c, Nuvi 760T, Nuvi 3790LMT, Zumo 660T

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Darwin needs to get with the new millennium and work faster. Too many people polluting the gene pool that never should have made it past childhood.

Harsh opinion, I know, but too many stories like this in this day and age that it's become commonplace, natural and expected for the general populace to automatically blame everyone *except* the person at fault.

Been there, done that !

Yes, indeed a little harsh with the Darwin comments.

Went fishing with a few friends and the kids while camping. Had the GPS route me back to camp.

Had to traverse some unbelievable roads. My F150 4x4 had no problems but other in SUV's and smaller trucks had a tough time.

Ascended the final hill and could see the paved road bot none of the other vehicles could make it to the top and had to turn around over the same rough terrain back to the longer route.

I don't blame the GPS though, just my own judgment. Others in the party blamed me and the GPS smile

Too funny!

People have let technology dim their critical thinking skills (if they had them in the first place!) by thinking it will pull their butts out of the fire.

God forbid if the 4 wheel, or all wheel drive failed on them. Most wouldn't be able to handle a snow-packed road, or ice... If the GPS or cell runs out of battery power, did you bother to notice the landmarks along the way?

Really, the best device a human has is their brain. It's a super-computer. Use it.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

flying

This reminds me of when I was learning to fly way back when. Car GPSs were not even thought of and Portable (hand held) Aviation GPS units had just started becoming popular. The units have a button called "Direct". By pushing this button you would get a course to fly directly to your destination. LOL, it didn't matter what kind of restricted airspace might be in your way. A lot of pilots got a legal surprise by pushing this button lol.

Have fun all.

Michael

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Have A Great Day! Michael

Luckily, didn't see any GPS items on first glance

Mpegger wrote:

Darwin needs to get with the new millennium and work faster. Too many people polluting the gene pool that never should have made it past childhood.

Harsh opinion, I know, but too many stories like this in this day and age that it's become commonplace, natural and expected for the general populace to automatically blame everyone *except* the person at fault.

I couldn't resist--just got the "2009" awards forwarded to me by a friend today, so your comment has perfect timing.

The Darwin Awards: http://www.darwinawards.com/

I've never checked to see if these are real or urban legends, but if fake, then they're the best bit of short fiction I've ever read. If real, supports the bumper sticker: "You--get out of the gene pool!"

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NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

not everyone is a Cray

Juggernaut wrote:

Really, the best device a human has is their brain. It's a super-computer. Use it.

Some are supercomputers, but others are Commodore VIC-20's. smile

Don't knock the Vic-20

I spent many an hour and learned a lot with only room for 2056 characters to write programs. And wasn't that cassette tape drive a fun way to save your programs for future use. smile

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:260W, 50LM

Commodores..!!

Ah, yes. The good old days of Commodore. I know them well.. starting with the "Pet" and ending with the "Amiga".

Nuvi1300WTGPS

Nuvi1300WTGPS@Gmail.com

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I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

Too Cool

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

Ah, yes. The good old days of Commodore. I know them well.. starting with the "Pet" and ending with the "Amiga".

Nuvi1300WTGPS

Nuvi1300WTGPS@Gmail.com

Hello fellow "Ol' Timmer" smile Its great to see other computer users that were around way back then. I remember the Pet days although I didn't have a pet I started in 78 with a TRS 80 level 1. Fun times. Lots of discoveries to be made.

Im just wondering, did you enjoy the interactive fiction adventure games Like ZORK and others?

Take care

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Have A Great Day! Michael

You poor guys!

Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

Ah, yes. The good old days of Commodore. I know them well.. starting with the "Pet" and ending with the "Amiga".

Nuvi1300WTGPS

Nuvi1300WTGPS@Gmail.com

I started with the powerful (snicker) Atari 400, with cassette non-random access storage, and dot matrix printer! Chose the membrane keyboard of the 400 over the real keyed Atari 800 for spill protection from my then 6 year old, but it sure made real typing difficult!

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NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

Toys?

NEOhioGuy wrote:
Nuvi1300WTGPS wrote:

Ah, yes. The good old days of Commodore. I know them well.. starting with the "Pet" and ending with the "Amiga".

Nuvi1300WTGPS

Nuvi1300WTGPS@Gmail.com

I started with the powerful (snicker) Atari 400, with cassette non-random access storage, and dot matrix printer! Chose the membrane keyboard of the 400 over the real keyed Atari 800 for spill protection from my then 6 year old, but it sure made real typing difficult!

July 1965 - Univac Digital Trainer

512 15 bit words.

First programming problem was to calculate the equivalent resistance of 3 resistors in parallel. Resistor values would be input into the A register and the equivalent resistance displayed in the Q register. Extra credit was given for input and output to the Frieden Flexowriter connected as the I/O device.

(Oh, it could be solved using just 24 instructions without using the Flexowriter.)

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ɐ‾nsǝɹ Just one click away from the end of the Internet

early computing

I also go back a long way in early home computing. I used an Olivetti Programma 101 (http://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/c-programma101.html) to teach programming concepts to high school students in the early 70's. The Programma was marketed as a "tabletop computer" but was actually a programmable calculator. My first home computer connection was a teletype ASR33 terminal dialed into a HP 2000 Acess timeshare computer via a 110 baud acoustic coupler. My first home computer was a Timex Sinclair 1000 (just for fun). The Timex had 4K of memory, used a conventional audio casette tape recorder for external storage, connected to the TV for display (black and white text only) and was programmed in interpreted Basic.

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Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

Boy does that bring back memories . .

alandb wrote:

I also go back a long way in early home computing. I used an Olivetti Programma 101 (http://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/c-programma101.html) to teach programming concepts to high school students in the early 70's. The Programma was marketed as a "tabletop computer" but was actually a programmable calculator. My first home computer connection was a teletype ASR33 terminal dialed into a HP 2000 Acess timeshare computer via a 110 baud acoustic coupler. My first home computer was a Timex Sinclair 1000 (just for fun). The Timex had 4K of memory, used a conventional audio casette tape recorder for external storage, connected to the TV for display (black and white text only) and was programmed in interpreted Basic.

Timex Sinclair 4k expanded to 8k) was my first computer. Amazing the programs I wrote with that, including a home security program. Then went on to a Kaypro Portable CP/M with two floppy disk drives. OFF topic or what?

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Looking for a place to go this summer? Try Oshkosh, WI, July 20-26, 2015. The largest gathering of aircraft in the world. http://www.airventure.org/index.html

Long Live the Imsai 8080

Ah, the good old TRS "trash" 80. I think I had a fancier IMSAI 8080 running CP/M, with all those big toggle switches to key stuff in. Old stuff for sure.

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TomTom One 125, One 140S, Via 1500 and iPhone TomTom App

This sure went off Topic

"GPS strands couple in forest" How did this get to old makes of computors. rolleyes

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

VIC-20

I still have mine, including the tape drive and plotter printer...

The thread got off topic John because some gps users don't have in their heads the computing power that this fine old machine has...

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Nuvi 2595LMT, Nuvi 1490T, Nuvi 260, GPSMAP 195

VIC-20

rocknicehunter wrote:

I still have mine, including the tape drive and plotter printer...

The thread got off topic John because some gps users don't have in their heads the computing power that this fine old machine has...

Ok I'll play dumb still what does any old computer have to do with a gps stranding old couple in the forest? confused

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

common sense

seems to apply to threads as well as gps usage.

not everyone

same rule does not apply to all people.

Stranded in forest

I once was stranded in a forest in New Mexico but it was in 1966 and was not GPS related. (The transfer case on my jeep busted.)

On the old computer sub-topic, the first computer I programmed for was an IBM 1620 in 1964.

GPS did it

My gps routed me off topic, really.

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Looking for a place to go this summer? Try Oshkosh, WI, July 20-26, 2015. The largest gathering of aircraft in the world. http://www.airventure.org/index.html

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bilson wrote:

My gps routed me off topic, really.

I'd recommend a hard reset, and a FW update. Really. wink

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK