Lens choices for new glasses

 

Since it's 2020, shall we talk about vision, particularly eyeglasses?

I recently had an eye exam and am now finding more choices for corrective lenses than ever.

There are the ones for blue screen, but now there are progressives for desk work, which I guess have a larger middle viewing window. One of the things I hated about needing bifocals was losing my side vision.

So my current conundrum is deciding if I should get a pair of these work specific bifocals, or just go with single vision for work. I have a 3 monitor system for the work I do, so I'm frequently switching the direction I'm looking and I feel like my current bifocals are not helpful for that. I don't have to read paper documents that often when working. Most of my work is onscreen. So the reader part of my glasses isn't that useful. It is for the rest of my life, for sure. Just not work. So it seems silly to me to pay extra for a specialized pair of computer work glasses.

But before I completely rule it out I thought I'd check with you all and see what your experience is with glasses and computer use.

No wrong answers here, just trying to get a few more data points before I make a decision.

Thanks In Advance!

~Angela

Progressives

I spent the last number of years of my work experience in front of a computer monitor(s) and about went nuts taking my glasses off and on all day. The answer for me was progressive lens.

My setup was high for distance, low for reading and center for work on the screen. I still use this setup after 20 years, with no complaints.

When my wife was recommended progressives, she found the need to turn her head to focus in the center views not to her liking so changed to bifocals. I never had this issue and if you don't mind moving YOURS, progressives are probably your answer, IMHO.

--
Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, DriveSmart 61, Garmin Backup Camera 40 and TomTom XXL540s.

Progressives or single vision reading glasses

My opinion on progressives is that the area of the lens that is devoted to the computer distance is fairly narrow, so that the head must be pointed exactly where it needs to be, both left-and-right AND up-and-down. Especially with three monitors, that is unacceptable.

Where I worked, I used more than one computer. For the last ten years, I have used single vision reading glasses which are for computer distance; weaker than the "reading glasses" prescription. These are in focus to the peripheral field of view. When the optometrist examines the eyes, just ask for a prescription for the computer distance also. Tell him what the distance is from the eye to the screen. For me, it is arm's length or about 2 feet.

With these glasses, I can also read printed material on the desk and take notes, even though it is a little closer. The downside is when I get up from the desk, I take the computer glasses off and might put the distance glasses on.

Get plastic lenses with anti-reflective coating that are thin and lightweight. Some plastics are more scratch-resistant than others. Some resist smudges better. Blue light filter is a personal choice if you are aware of the need to avoid blue light.

dobs108 smile

scratches

Another thing! Scratches do happen and glasses have to be replaced from time to time. Single vision is less expensive than progressives.

dobs108 smile

Glasses

...and here I thought we'd be comparing CR39 to polycarbonate to...

It sounds like we're pretty similarly situated: the need for either a bi/tri/focal or progressive and a considerable amount of time spent at computer monitors at a distance of maybe 2.5 feet.

First, for all non-computer monitor viewing, I prefer a progressive lens. The first time I needed more than a single vision lens, my vanity opted for progressive over bifocal because "old" people wear bifocals. I've stuck with them ever since and never looked back. I did compare the cheaper progressives with Varilux® lens and found Varilux gives me a lot larger width of viewing at mid distances so I spend the extra for Varilux for my primary glasses. For sunglasses, I feel I can get by without Varilux and go for the cheaper midrange "digital" progressive. I can't remember the name for the cheapest version of progressive but I do skip those. Since much of my sunglass-wearing time is spent driving, I go with a gradient tint (dark gray tint on the distance vision to nearly clear for the near vision) as that gives me more light to see the dashboard and other automotive interiors.

Second, for computer work, I use cheap department/drug/store reading glasses choosing a "strength" that works best at around 2.5 feet, roughly half or less the "ADD" value of my prescription primary glasses. Trying to work any length of time at a PC with my primary glasses had me tilting my head up to get to the midrange of the progressive and that gets really uncomfortable quite quickly. I found that these days, even the cheap non-Rx "readers" are available as a "progressive" with a slight varying strength between the upper and lower portion of the lens and that's nice as it gives a larger useful working range of good focus vision. Just choose the strength that lets you see your computer monitor without having to crane your neck up or down for monitor viewing. I just leave these "readers" by the computer and swap over to them from the primary glasses when I'm at the PC. I will guess that for folks with a substantial amount of astigmatism, these non-Rx readers may not be a good choice but you can try them out at the drugstore before deciding to buy them.

After my cataract surgeries, my distance vision is now more than good enough for driving (legally, too, mind you) and other distance viewing without glasses but I still have Rx glasses made for me that are now nearly no correction for distance and my ADD value for close up work. It's more expensive than buying half-glasses and better for my vanity than "old person" readers on a cord around my neck that I'd always be putting on or taking off.

Other folks with interesting vision issues like computer monitor viewing include musicians who need to clearly see the music on the stand in front of them as well as the conductor at a distance and the two segments of each lens needs to be exactly in the proper location.

One last thought. Especially for progressives, glasses purchased locally are so pricey that it's worth looking into mail-order glasses. Other than knowing your current prescription, you will need to know your PD or pupillary distance between the eyes. If willing to try this, I've found that for my primary glasses, I do my mailorder business with 39dollarglasses and for my gradient sunglasses, I go with Goggles4U. Even if you strike out occasionally by buying ill-suited frames, the savings are so large that you can still be ahead by going mail order, especially during their sales. Lower prices also help justify getting Rx sunglasses and a spare pair of glasses.

There are many other mail order businesses selling Rx glasses so check into them all and read the reviews of each business. This is what works for me but won't work for everyone. Caveat emptor. I've always wanted to write that. cool

not sure

I am not sure about which ones, as I seem to have broken/lost lots of glasses lately. What I have never lost/broken are sunglasses.

So now, I get internet eyeglasses, and have gotten expensive sunglasses due to end of year FSA being untouched. So it's been Oakley and Maui Jim.

What is fascinating is that internet glasses are pretty d*** good! I am talking rimless for maybe $60? I highly recommend them. That way if lost/broken one doesn't have to feel awful (I used to pay $400 for nice glasses from you know the mall chains etc.)

Using FSA is nice too I mean why not save what we can, right?

p.s. one time I had not cleared my windshield well, so I pulled over to do so. I had an huge Oakley case in my jacket pocket with internet glasses inside, I was wearing the Oakleys. I drive away, CRUNCH!!!! Oh **** what was that? I drove over the Oakley case, and thank goodness the internet glasses were inside! I have left them in the garage, basement, someone stole them in Chicago O'Hare (haha you thought they were stylish but they were $60 internet glasses!)....again I am super careful with the sunglasses though....

PS

GlobeTurtle, I'm not sure from your message if you now have and use bi/tri/progressives or if you're just at the point of needing them to replace your single vision lenses.

In case you've been single vision lensed up to now, be very careful the first few days with any multifocus lens, especially on stairways, etc. Then after those first few days, still be careful. It takes the brain a while to adjust to these lenses and when on a stairway, for example, you may think there's one more or one less step and that can lead to quite a painful fall. shock > surprised > sad Handrails are good too. wink

Also, if your eye-to-monitor(s) distance(s) are all a single fixed distance and you can keep that distance all the time, a single vision "computer distance" pair of glasses might work for you at a low cost and with a wide and tall field of view. I doubt that it would work for me and have never tried that.

Too many options

I think we all face option overload at times. In my case, I needed lenses to correct astigmatism and for years the only correction I needed was for distance. I opted for progressives that darken in sunlight eliminating the need for sunglasses. The newest version of that now darken to a degree inside a car, where the older ones didn't. The downside of that is that if you come in from bright sunlight, it takes a minute or 2 to clear up and that can be distracting.

As others have noted, each area of a progressive lens has a particular focal point that is not even side to side. In time you adapt and turn your head to look up down and to the side. Trying to watch tv for a time gives me a crick in my neck as I have to keep my head in one position for long periods. For me that is a downside for progressive lenses. I do have a pair of single vision to watch TV, but otherwise for computer time and driving and just any day to day activities, I am happy with the progressive lenses.

A friend had trifocals and wanted to get away from the lines and tried progressives but he found initially finding the sweet spots more trouble than the lines. After a few months, he was finally comfortable with the progressives.

One observation I initially had with progressives was that straight vertical lines in my peripheral vision seemed bowed.

--
"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Very good point Craig

CraigW wrote:

...
In case you've been single vision lensed up to now, be very careful the first few days with any multifocus lens, especially on stairways, etc. Then after those first few days, still be careful. It takes the brain a while to adjust to these lenses and when on a stairway, for example, you may think there's one more or one less step and that can lead to quite a painful fall. shock > surprised > sad Handrails are good too. wink
...

Either the line in bifocals or even the bottom of the lenses on progressives make that last step a guess. Even after years with them, I have adapted to look directly at those steps. My wife missed a bottom step and ended up with both feet in casts for a few months. Thank you Craig for mentioned this.

--
"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Becarefull

Don't get to much tint put on and don't get the ones that change from dark outside to light inside. They don't work to good when your working on a computer or even driving at night.

--
johnm405 660 & MSS&T

Are you farsighted?

I am farsighted and use glasses exclusively for reading, computer work, close stuff, within arms reach. My distance vision is still very good, no correction needed. Therefore, I use readers exclusively. These are pure readers, not bifocals or progressives. This works great for me. I wear these low on my nose so I can look over them.

I also use sunglasses and had prescription bifocal sunglasses made. Now the far field portion of the lenses have no correction, but the lower bifocal near field area of the lenses has the reader correction function. This works great.

I tried the progressives with the sunglasses and it didn't work for me. The blending between the two vision fields seemed to be large and I lost lots of useful lens. I had to work at aiming the progressives at whatever I was looking at to use that portion of the lens. Went with straight up bifocals and love them. No problems choosing either field, it's natural.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

progressive

I recently got progressives even though I don't need reading glasses b/c I am constantly taking my glasses off to read or talk to people.
I do not like them b/c it is only clear in the middle, you have to turn your head to see correctly; your peripheral vision is still blurry.

I've been wearing

I've been wearing progressives since sometime around 1986. The only problem I'm now having with them is when I'm flying my RC aircraft. The issue is the change from far to mid you hit when trying to land the plane and it descends toward the runway.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

glasses

iv had cataracts removed and I have glaucoma and im 78 and its hell to drive at night when its raining , I have antiglare no lines progressive with something for long hours in front of a monitor(I don't remember what it was called) they are somewhat better than my last pair they help with headlights coming at you at night and believe it or not I got them at Walmart , my eye doctor wrote the prescription and they just filled it !

Some other things to consider...

Most States require that the examining DR. provide you with the prescription so that you can then shop for cost effective glasses. This past summer I explored and was very happy with an option that I used for regular single vision glasses in both clear and sunglasses versions. The company I used is called OverNight Glasses and their website is https://www.overnightglasses.com/. Basically you send them old but decent frames, your prescription, and they will fit the frames with new lenses. In my instance I had perfectly fine 3-year old frames and for about $75 (clear) got new lenses to a current Rx. The turnaround time was about 10 days, although you can pay a premium for quicker service. The sun glasses were about $90. You can also get complete glasses on line if you don’tt have old frames that you like. Checking locally, even with a Visionworks deal where the discount was your age (I'm 75) new glasses were well over $200 each.

If your can get your prescription to indicate "dual" pupil distance for both distance and near vision.

As for "blue" filter glasses, you might want to read the article at https://www.cnet.com/how-to/what-are-blue-light-blocking-gla....

--
John from PA

2020. I can't see that well.

Being very myopic, I wear contact lenses for distance vision. They don't correct my astigmatism, mild in my right eye and medium in my left. I get just under 20/20 corrected vision on my right and about 20/25 on my left. My emergency back-up pair would give me an Excedrin headache level 4, long with disorientation from distorted vision.

My vision insurance covers one pair of glasses or one box per eye of disposable contact lenses per year, and I opt to go for reading glasses since it's a better coverage.

My standard reading glasses are "progressive" bifocal. The main part is mid-distance with astigmatism correction for computer work, with close-up portion at the bottom for fine prints. I have three pairs that I've collected over the past three years.

I also have a mono-focal pair with astigmatism correction that I got on sale. I use this pair for lots of close-up work with lots of fine prints. They aren't versatile, but great for specific tasks.

They are all anti-glare and anti-scratch coated, but not light-weight material like my back-up pair for contact lens emergency.

That's what's been working for me so far. Your mileage will definitely vary. For that matter, my mileage will, too, as I continue to get older.

It Depends

What works best for me may not be as useful for you.

I spend a high percentage of my work day on a computer, and I had to switch to bifocals for routine usage 37 years ago. However, I have had arthritis in my neck for over 50 years, so tilting my head back even a little bit to look at a computer screen becomes painful very quickly.

My solution was to have my ophthalmologist write me a prescription optimized for use on the computer. It is adequate - but not perfect - for most of the other things I do at my desk, and I just switch to my normal bifocals when I am not at the computer. That habit of switching back and forth between different frames took a couple of weeks to become second nature, but it is handled automatically now by my subconscious.

You won't have my neck issues, but I mentioned all of this to point out that using a different set of frames/lenses for use at a computer quickly becomes a trivial issue, and it can avoid some of the complications of other solutions.

- Tom -

--
XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

zenni optical

I have used Zenni Optical. Their website makes it easy to choose frames, lens material, and enter the prescription.

https://www.zennioptical.com/tv

the other thing

is I don't prefer to see a optometrist. If you are easily offended please don't read on.

I am not sure why they are allowed to use the title dr., as optometrists, chiropractors, and podiatrists, have never gone to medical school.

I prefer to be examined by an ophthalmologist

This is how someone put it to me. If you played in the NFL or NHL, which kind would you be taken to by the team? In each case the one who went to medical school--ophthalmologist, or orthopedic surgeon.

Somewhat disagree, depending on circumstances

johnnatash4 wrote:

is I don't prefer to see a optometrist. If you are easily offended please don't read on.

I am not sure why they are allowed to use the title dr., as optometrists, chiropractors, and podiatrists, have never gone to medical school.

I prefer to be examined by an ophthalmologist

This is how someone put it to me. If you played in the NFL or NHL, which kind would you be taken to by the team? In each case the one who went to medical school--ophthalmologist, or orthopedic surgeon.

At least with respect to an optometrist, they do go through extensive training which gives them the ability to recognize a "health" problem (glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachments, macular degeneration, etc.). In many States they can actually treat these issues but most importantly they can and then recommend an ophthalmologist.

To lump podiatrists into your blanket statement is just incorrect. Podiatrists can perform soft tissue surgeries, skin surgery and nail surgery. Podiatrists can also order and take x-rays of the foot. Their training is almost as extensive as an MD or DO in that the four-year podiatric medical school is followed by a surgical based residency, which is hands-on post-doctoral training.

Funny story, many years ago I had a foot problem and was treated unsuccessfully numerous times by an MD (orthopedic surgeon). Finally he recommended a podiatrist and simply stated that the podiatrist spends 7 years studying the foot and ankle and he had spent about 7 weeks doing the same. Three visits with the podiatrist, one involving surgery, and now 30 years later the issue has never reoccurred.

Oh, by the way, a Chiropractor (one individual) in Philadelphia is on staff for the Philadelphia Eagles and Flyers and likely serves a useful purpose.

--
John from PA

Wow!

Since everyone's eyes are different, there are sure to be many opinions offered here.

This has been my experience:

I need / wear bifocals. I tried progressive lenses but lost too much clear vision in the area where the prescriptions "blend".

I do a lot of computer work and get a neck ache from tilting my head back to use the reading section of my bifocals to read the screen.

I tried the drugstore "readers" but couldn't get a pair with the right strength.

I went to a Walmart vision center for my regular exam and bought a pair of 24" fixed focus computer glasses with plastic lenses for $43. Yes, it means changing glasses many times during the day but to me, this was the best option.

Clearly, what works for some, may not for all. The trick is to look at the options and find the one that works best for you.

A reply

johnnatash4 wrote:

The Other Thing is I don't prefer to see a optometrist. If you are easily offended please don't read on.

I am not sure why they are allowed to use the title dr., as optometrists, chiropractors, and podiatrists, have never gone to medical school.

I prefer to be examined by an ophthalmologist

Back when I attended college, healthcare doctors were MDs or DOs almost entirely and I expect most folks back then would agree with your feelings. It took me a while to accept what follows, so I can understand your feelings.

But these days, healthcare doctorate degrees include (and I'm forgetting many) dentists, pharmacists, physical therapists, podiatrists, some psychologists, and so many more, some as the entry-level degree to practice their specialty and some as an optional degree beyond the entry-level educational requirement.

Now in the 21st century, we need to separate our understanding of the terms Doctor and Physician (and if a physician, identify medical vs naturopathic, etc.) Complicating matters even further, retired MDs for example, are still oftentimes addressed as Doctor So-and-so but if they're no longer maintaining their Continuing Education and state licensure in the US, they aren't or at least shouldn't be treating patients.

Regarding ODs vs MDs in ophthalmology, today many of the excellent active eye care clinics with the best equipment and skilled personnel are staffed with one or more ophthalmologists and one or more optometrists with the optometrists doing the routine eye exams (both for the refractive prescription and for issues with identifying cataracts, retinal issues, vitreous detachments, corneal issues, etc.) and they refer patients needing advanced medical care to the ophthalmologist. When I was due for cataract surgery, my optometrist referred me to the ophthalmologist for the surgeries but a majority of the followup was still done by my optometrist. What I do believe is important for eye care in an aging global population is that routine eye care exams should include more than just a refractive prescription but should include a thorough exam with dilation, and examination of the cornea, lens, retina, etc.

One can argue and I will agree that having skilled workers with less than a MD or DO degree is the best way to obtain care quickly and economically and offers services in rural areas and the like which couldn't support an MD or DO.

Progressives

I have been wearing progressives since I started getting old and had to move over from single vision lenses. (About 25 years. Of course, I started getting old when I was ten. grin ) The only problem that I have observed with progressives is the time that it takes to get used to them. I tell people to give them about a month to get fully used to them. I use them for computer use and have no issues. As time goes by, you will automatically move your head to get the best view. Some vision providers will let you try progressives and if you can’t get used to them, they will let you switch over to bifocals without any extra charge. I know when I got my first pair, the optician gave me that option. Ask and see if they will do that for you.

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

haha

I didn't go to college that long ago.

BUT.

I will illustrate.

My son broke his leg this summer, he was 5 y.o.

The emergency visit was $3,700, nothing complex.

The person who had the task of doing the cast, was a second week intern.

I think the person had integrity. He told us he had never done a cast before, and was calling for the attending physician.

We are the customer, we can choose. This doctor did not have to tell us he had never done a cast, that was up to him, and we appreciated him. He's going to be a fine doctor, but to be honest, he was not qualified to cast my son's leg.

Eyes are pretty important, just me, I'd be selective on who can do anything with yours.

Then again....

Progressives plus many

My daily wear do most tasks eyeglasses are progressive lensed. While head movement can put almost anything in focus, the width and height of the focused region is small.

As with most folks posting here, I use a computer a lot, and unlike most I'm a serious pianist. Both tasks benefit from having a much larger "focus patch" than progressives can possibly give. Happily, the distance for both is about the same (about 28 inches for me). So sometimes I've had my optometrist brew up a "computer" single-focus prescription, and sometimes I've fudged my own as an intermediate between the reading and distance prescription.

The key point is that cheap internet glasses are so very, very cheap than I can and do keep a pair at each computer and at the piano. So I'm not tempted to "get by" with my progressives. Some of my internet cheapies have had short-lived frames, and one place mis-located the bifocal region on a pair of driving bifocals. So for durability or more complex tasks you may want a reliable supplier. But internet cheapies for single focus without fancy extras can be had for under $20.

Yet another use I have for Internet single-focus cheapies is outside work. I keep a pair of dark glasses with big lenses (I use an aviator style frame) by each of the two doors I usually use to go work outside. That prescription is one I hand-brewed without consulting an optometrist. It is another step (maybe one diopter) farther toward my distance prescription than are my computer glasses. This compromise works for me outside. I can read written notes from my pocket on how to winterize my evaporative cooler when I'm on the roof, and yet when I glance at the mountain peak two miles away it looks good. All while my eyes enjoy UV protection and a bit of relief from the brightness of New Mexico sunshine.

After a couple of bad experiences, I no longer buy my most purposes progressives from an Internet cheapie place at all--the shops at the optometrist or Sam's club are far more expensive, but more reliable, and will fix most frame problems without charge if I pay a visit.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Keep It Simple

This is your eyesight.

Be concerned about how well you can see, not so much about what you look like.

I was convinced progressives were good because there was no line to be seen in the lenses. I also lost a rather large field of vision from the blending between the two lens powers. Got rid of the progressives in a couple days, got the traditional bifocals and have been happy ever since.

Blue filtering can be a good thing. Blue is the hardest color for our eyes to focus, and hence causes stress and strain.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Thank you!

I really appreciate the thought out responses.

I have been wearing progressive bifocals for about a year. Again, I find it a bit of a pain to have to turn my head so much while working, so I tired working with my single vision contacts and found it worked fine. I can see everything I need to see and rarely need to read small print for a significant amount of time.
I might try a pair of the computer bifocals with the expanded middle section, but I agree it would be better to get those from a more reputable place, I usually use Costco, but it's still difficult for me to shell out $300 for a pair of glasses.
When I got my first pair of progressive bifocals a few years ago, I purchased them there so that I knew the opticians would get the pupillary distance correct, etc. Then I ordered my backups online. Perhaps I should do that again.
Like TXRVer said, information or options overload!

Thanks again for sharing your experiences!

~Angela

All in favor?

GlobeTurtle wrote:

I really appreciate the thought out responses...
~Angela

All in favor of GlobeTurtle getting this week's COW award for entertaining us during a bleak winter season? cool

PS to GT: Goggles4U occasionally offers a sale of a single vision pair of glasses, frame and lenses, for $10-ish or less. These could be great for experimenting with a single vision Rx set for your computer distance. I have to think that G4U offers these sales to tempt folks fearful of ordering online to give'm a try. Since you know what Rx to use based on your success with the single vision contacts, you'd probably come up with a pair that would work with the computers on your first try. Select the frame with the biggest lenses and maybe you could see all three monitors without moving your head.

All in favor of GlobeTurtle getting this week's COW award for en

CraigW wrote:
GlobeTurtle wrote:

I really appreciate the thought out responses...
~Angela

All in favor of GlobeTurtle getting this week's COW award for entertaining us during a bleak winter season? cool

PS to GT: Goggles4U occasionally offers a sale of a single vision pair of glasses, frame and lenses, for $10-ish or less. These could be great for experimenting with a single vision Rx set for your computer distance. I have to think that G4U offers these sales to tempt folks fearful of ordering online to give'm a try. Since you know what Rx to use based on your success with the single vision contacts, you'd probably come up with a pair that would work with the computers on your first try. Select the frame with the biggest lenses and maybe you could see all three monitors without moving your head.

I would vote for that.

--
johnm405 660 & MSS&T

Costco

You can get the exam there, grab your prescription and submit them to an online glass company. The Costco eye exam is very thorough. One plus with the $300 Costco glasses is that you have three months to swap them out at no cost if you are not comfortable with them.

--
Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

.

I got a pair of computer eyeglasses last year after using progressive lenses for years. I now regret it as I can't see too far.

I recommend you to get both.

--
Michael (Nuvi 2639LMT)

Glass Lenses

You are fortunate that you are only now needing glasses. I have had to wear glasses all my life. The optical shops have been increasingly "pushing" polycarbonate lenses. In fact, it is getting very difficult, almost to the point of impossibility, to get glass lenses.

Despite what the optical shops say, that there is little difference between plastic and glass; I have to use glass. Glass is better, but then I have an extreme prescription. So for people with only minor vision problems, plastic may be a good choice.

For computer work, polycarbonate lenses will probably work-out. For me the polycarbonate lenses didn't work for distance and peripheral vision. Fuzzy distance vision and peripheral distortion.

--
Garmin Nuvi650 - Morehead City, NC

I have had three monitors

Here's my $0.02 worth...again my person experience which may not suit your situation.

The biggest issue is the SIZE of the frame where the lens goes. The bigger the lens (yea 2018 to 2020 and big frames coming back into style) the better size each of the three "zones" are and the better lenses give you very good side vision without tilting or turning your head.

Next you have to be ergonomically placed for your eye to screen positioning. You want your head looking straight and able to tilt down. You definitely do not want to have to tilt your head up to read the top of the screen.

The majority of my staff originally had their monitors/chair height set incorrectly and would get a sore neck or headaches. A proper ergonomic assessment and adjusting position did the trick. Glasses are only good if you are properly setup otherwise you will have issues with multiple monitors no matter what lenses, bi-focal or progressive, you buy.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I have had three monitors for over two decades (originally 14" or 15" LOL). currently one office is 3 x 24" and the other is 2 x 27 & 1 x 32

The recommendation i got was Essilor (starting in 1995) and now Nikon (2015) progressives. I see all three monitors (main dead centre and one on each side as wings). My side vision is great compared to the low cost lenses.

https://www.essilor.ca/en/products/varilux?gclid=EAIaIQobChM...

https://www.nikonlenswear.ca/

Both have been superb with the Nikon being a slight bit better.

it's

visiter555 wrote:

Here's my $0.02 worth...again my person experience which may not suit your situation.

The biggest issue is the SIZE of the frame where the lens goes. The bigger the lens (yea 2018 to 2020 and big frames coming back into style) the better size each of the three "zones" are and the better lenses give you very good side vision without tilting or turning your head.

Next you have to be ergonomically placed for your eye to screen positioning. You want your head looking straight and able to tilt down. You definitely do not want to have to tilt your head up to read the top of the screen.

The majority of my staff originally had their monitors/chair height set incorrectly and would get a sore neck or headaches. A proper ergonomic assessment and adjusting position did the trick. Glasses are only good if you are properly setup otherwise you will have issues with multiple monitors no matter what lenses, bi-focal or progressive, you buy.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I have had three monitors for over two decades (originally 14" or 15" LOL). currently one office is 3 x 24" and the other is 2 x 27 & 1 x 32

The recommendation i got was Essilor (starting in 1995) and now Nikon (2015) progressives. I see all three monitors (main dead centre and one on each side as wings). My side vision is great compared to the low cost lenses.

https://www.essilor.ca/en/products/varilux?gclid=EAIaIQobChM...

https://www.nikonlenswear.ca/

Both have been superb with the Nikon being a slight bit better.

funny how monitors used to be a status symbol. No money manager would have less than 2 CRTs taking up who knows 5 cu ft of desk space (they just got bigger desks). I was a b-student back then and I remember seeing a pic of Bob Stansky's desk with mongo CRTs--imagine all the heat and energy consumed, but hey it was the tail end of the excess.

Last year, we moved our corp hq and every single workspace has dual 24" bezeless monitors. Even the unoccupied ones. One for work, one for shopping lol

Aye!

CraigW wrote:
GlobeTurtle wrote:

I really appreciate the thought out responses...
~Angela

All in favor of GlobeTurtle getting this week's COW award for entertaining us during a bleak winter season? cool

PS to GT: Goggles4U occasionally offers a sale of a single vision pair of glasses, frame and lenses, for $10-ish or less. These could be great for experimenting with a single vision Rx set for your computer distance. I have to think that G4U offers these sales to tempt folks fearful of ordering online to give'm a try. Since you know what Rx to use based on your success with the single vision contacts, you'd probably come up with a pair that would work with the computers on your first try. Select the frame with the biggest lenses and maybe you could see all three monitors without moving your head.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Can be slow sometimes

GlobeTurtle wrote:

Since it's 2020, shall we talk about vision, particularly eyeglasses?

~Angela

I just got that.

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GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Yikes!

diesel wrote:
GlobeTurtle wrote:

Since it's 2020, shall we talk about vision, particularly eyeglasses?

~Angela

I just got that.

Yikes, thanks for making me think. Ha! redface

I will...

phranc wrote:
CraigW wrote:
GlobeTurtle wrote:

I really appreciate the thought out responses...
~Angela

All in favor of GlobeTurtle getting this week's COW award for entertaining us during a bleak winter season? cool

PS to GT: Goggles4U occasionally offers a sale of a single vision pair of glasses, frame and lenses, for $10-ish or less. These could be great for experimenting with a single vision Rx set for your computer distance. I have to think that G4U offers these sales to tempt folks fearful of ordering online to give'm a try. Since you know what Rx to use based on your success with the single vision contacts, you'd probably come up with a pair that would work with the computers on your first try. Select the frame with the biggest lenses and maybe you could see all three monitors without moving your head.

...third or fourth that; whatever the case may be.

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It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington