Android Auto Versus In-Dash GPS and Standalone GPS

 

At the beginning of 2019 we got a new car, a Subaru Forester with an in-dash TomTom GPS. We also have, a Nuvi650 that we have used for the past 11 years!!!!!

Anyway, we recently bought a new smartphone. Previously we only had a dumb phone. So we are now up-to-date. grin

We just installed Android Auto so I was wonder how well it works.

The Subaru's in-dash TomTom has a magnificent display that can be easily modified, but it is NOT as good as a navigation device as the 11 year old Garmin650. It is also more difficult to use.

The standalone Garmin650 works well and we still take it with us since we don't trust the in-dash TomTom. By today's standard the Nuvi650 has a too small a screen. I also don't know how much longer it will continue to work.

Since we just installed Android Auto, I don't yet know how well it will work. Looks like it would be superior to the in-dash TomTom.

What are your thoughts?

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Garmin Nuvi650 - Morehead City, NC

Android Auto.

It works OK, but it does not measure up to my Garmin nuvi 3597 IMO. There is much more info available on the 3597 screen, better navigation prompts, easier to read map (better contrast and more detail), and it supports multipoint routes, custom POI's with alerts, favorites, etc. Maybe Android Auto supports multipoint routes and some of these other features, but I have never figured out how to do it. I have found Garmin's Smartphone Link traffic to be as good or better than Android Auto (using Google navigation, not Waze). I sometimes run Android Auto and Garmin 3597 side by side just to compare them. For me, I prefer the Garmin hands down for these and many other reasons.

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Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

Android Auto Versus In-Dash GPS And Standalone GPS

Steve R. wrote:

At the beginning of 2019 we got a new car, a Subaru Forester with an in-dash TomTom GPS. We also have, a Nuvi650 that we have used for the past 11 years!!!!!

Anyway, we recently bought a new smartphone. Previously we only had a dumb phone. So we are now up-to-date. grin

We just installed Android Auto so I was wonder how well it works.

The Subaru's in-dash TomTom has a magnificent display that can be easily modified, but it is NOT as good as a navigation device as the 11 year old Garmin650. It is also more difficult to use.

The standalone Garmin650 works well and we still take it with us since we don't trust the in-dash TomTom. By today's standard the Nuvi650 has a too small a screen. I also don't know how much longer it will continue to work.

Since we just installed Android Auto, I don't yet know how well it will work. Looks like it would be superior to the in-dash TomTom.

What are your thoughts?

Well, since you asked, here goes. You made it clear that you don't care for the Tom Tom in-dash all that much and like the Garmin Nuvi 650. Don't fight it, get a refurbished Garmin Nuvi 3597. It has a larger screen than the Nuvi 650 and the re-furbished units are very affordable.

I am also in the "camp" of using more than one device, particularly on longer trips. When you travel use BOTH your new Garmin Nuvi 3597 and Google Maps. If they agree on a route, you are good to go. When they don't, then it is time to look closer and find out why they don't agree.

I also have a Garmin DriveLuxe 51LMT. Both the Nuvi 3597 and Garmin DriveLuxe 51LMT are great units. There may have even been a post here recently on refurbished Garmin DriveLuxe 51LMT.

We also got a new car this

We also got a new car this year and it has both Android and that other auto program available. The built in nav is quite good at getting from A to B but is very poor at setting up a route over specific roads. My 3597 is my choice for routes and traffic info even though my car is supposed to show traffic.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

I think the point A to point

I think the point A to point B is what the majority only need.

The route of multiple points is what I see lacking in the built-in devices. That and the fact they are almost always years out-of-date.

I think GM and it's OnStar system is the worst I have seen. You have to place an onboard "call" to OnStar and give them the destination you want to reach. Then the directions start. Whatever you do don't go off route more than 3-4 times or you will be disconnected. And to top it off you pay $350 a year for that.
Not me!

I'll stick with my Garmin units.

And if you are going to use Android Auto, why not just hang a tablet on the dash and let that guide you. Why have a cell phone connected to the built-in nav using Google maps to guide you. Bigger screen?

Again, car makers don't want to provide the system and all it's problems. They are going to let Google and Apple do it for them and all they have to do is provide a link and display.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

AA vs Garmin

AA has its good points, but it also has its very bad points.

AA - good
1. convenient. it uses the built in screen, easy to see
2. 100% up to date on every POI you could want as well as new streets
3. does a very good job of continuously providing route alternatives
4. Waze - good information on road hazards, police, traffic

AA - bad / Garmin - good
1. no routing capability - cannot create, save, and reuse a route. It can only add a waypoint to an existing route, and that is not easy.
2. waypoints - it can store waypoints, but there is no organization to the storage. Very crude and very hard to use

I do use AA when going someplace simple or going someplace known as I like seeing if there is traffic or road hazards. I do use my Garmin for any trip where I want to plan out stops and specific routes as AA cannot do those things.

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___________________ Garmin 2455, 855, Oregon 550t

used both

In dash, as you say, we love it, but it's hard to use
Garmin for bigger screen, live traffic, not as good as Waze but
ok on the long roads.
Waze for cities Hope this help

AA hands down the best

I had been a Garmin devotee for many years, continuously upgrading to better and bigger units, Then I bought a car with AA and a large screen. Loved it from day one. I use Google Maps and seldom use Waze. Google Maps allow you to custom maps to your phone for those times you may not have good cellular reception.

As for routing on long trips, I use Google Maps on a computer and layout a trip. You can have 8 destinations in the trip, so it gets quite easy to layout a route. You can choose destinations by name or choose points on the map. Once you have the route set, you can send it to your phone or email. I send to both, the email allows you to historically open on the computer to modify if necessary.

When you send to your phone, google maps will open with your route, before closing save to your Home screen and you can always open it up for later use.