Mysterious device gives burglars easy access to cars' keyless-entry systems.

 

Mysterious device gives burglars easy access to cars' keyless-en

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-doug "Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and the shadows will fall behind you" W. Whitman

and

A hammer to the window does the same thing

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Never argue with a pig. It makes you look foolish and it anoys the hell out of the pig!

wireless hack

I am sure this will only get easier for a thief as the tech becomes better.

What's next

Maybe we should go to fingerprint scanners or even retina scanners but like was said a hammer works just as well

Another approach

I'd like the car to do a retina scan of the driver, and if the driver is not on the authorized user list, the car locks and notifies police. Of course that could be a problem if you forget to approve the valet parker or auto mechanic.

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JMoo On

That's what Valet mode is

That's what Valet mode is for.

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Frank DriveSmart55 37.322760, -79.511267

Well that's what insurance

Well that's what insurance is for (minus your deductable). But seriously don't leave anything of value in plain sight, or in the vehicle for that matter.

I agree

john9871 wrote:

Well that's what insurance is for (minus your deductable). But seriously don't leave anything of value in plain sight, or in the vehicle for that matter.

Another thing is never leave your garage door opener clipped to your visor. They break into the car take the garage door opener and get your address from the glove box. They then go straight to your home and use the opener for easy entry.

My last 3 cars have had the opener built into the car and I would not buy one without that feature.

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GM Built-in Navigation system - Samsung S6 Edge+ Smartphone with Garmin Viago, Google Maps & HERE Apps

Check this out!

This is funny and something to think about with all this new tech!

http://www.flixxy.com/welcome-funny-dutch-insurance-commerci...

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Bobkz - Garmin Nuvi 3597LMTHD/2455LMT/C530/C580- "Pain Is Fear Leaving The Body - Semper Fidelis"

Nice commercial

I drive a 1998 Honda Civic with 4/40 air conditioning (4 windows down at 40 miles per hour). The only ways into it are:

1) The key
2) a Slim Jim
3) A well aimed rock or brick

Being that it's usually the least desirable car on the lot, I have never been worried.

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Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

Fingerprint Scanner

You might not want to use a fingerprint scanner to protect your car:

Police in Malaysia are hunting for members of a violent gang who chopped off a car owner's finger to get round the vehicle's hi-tech security system.

The car, a Mercedes S-class, was protected by a fingerprint recognition system.

Full article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4396831.stm

Fingerprints aren't secure

You leave your fingerprints all over the place. I saw a video of how easy it was to get into a safe with a fingerprint scanner. In the case of a car, just take a fingerprint off the door handle and you can make a fake fingertip.

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d

Access to Key Fob?

One possible cause is that the robber got access to his key fob and recorded the signal, then was able to use it to open the car door later (similar to garage door openers). It could be accessed by mechanic, parking lot attendant, fellow worker (if fob is left in coat pocket), or many other folks.

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Tuckahoe Mike - Nuvi 3490LMT, Nuvi 260W, iPhone X, Mazda MX-5 Nav

Rolling codes

Tuckahoemike wrote:

One possible cause is that the robber got access to his key fob and recorded the signal,....

That doesn't work. All cars with key fobs (and all garage door openers made in the last 20 years or so) use a non-repeating rolling code. The transmitter generates a new code for each transmission. The receiver knows what the last code it received was and listens for the next code. Actually, it listens for any of the next 256 codes, since the button might have been accidentally pushed one or more times while the transmitter was out of range. And it listens for different codes for each fob that it is paired with (which explains why the fobs don't have to be in sync and why you can not use a second fob for six months but it will still work when it transmits to the car again).

Recording the transmission did work on very old garage door openers, but that is no longer a common problem.

Don't believe me? Take your fob out of range of the car. Then slowly press the open button 300 times. Go back to your car. Then go to your dealer and get him to retrain your car to your fob.

Easy

In most affluent neighborhoods just try the handle many residents never lock their car doors and many leave the garage door open all night

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Interesting

This is good to know. Thanks.

coat hanger

Some delivery drivers at a store I use to work at would leave there keys in their car every now and then. A coat hanger and a couple minutes later they unlock their cars. It was surprising how easy it is.

Wow

Wow, interesting. But if cars use or used rolling codes, how could a thief even use the same code again? Incredible.

wireless

if its wireless electronic its hack able !! nothing is protected !! a lock only keeps your friends out . new electronics are nice and handy and easy to use but remember banks, retail stores, email, medical accounts, are all hack able you read about them it seems about every other day. and remember these people spend millions on security and still they are hacked. the best security for your home is a big black Vicious looking dog growling at you lol

Hedy Lamar Inventor may have had the answer.

I expect this problem is another example of lack of automaker insight as to potential problems, or maybe they saved a nickle per unit.

So, where's today's Hedy Lamar when we need her? She was the inventor of Spread Spectrum Technology. Seems like they should use a similar, but updated version to solve this problem.

Quote from site about her invention.
http://www.women-inventors.com/Hedy-Lammar.asp

"The international beauty icon, along with co-inventor George Anthiel, developed a "Secret Communications System" to help combat the Nazis in World War II. By manipulating radio frequencies at irregular intervals between transmission and reception, the invention formed an unbreakable code to prevent classified messages from being intercepted by enemy personnel."

The US also used it during the Cuban missile crisis too, and I believe that cell phone encryption today uses it.

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rvOutrider

rolling codes

ptownoddy wrote:

Wow, interesting. But if cars use or used rolling codes, how could a thief even use the same code again? Incredible.

Simply put, they can't. That is why rolling codes are used.

That is not to say the systems are unbreakable. If one knows the algorithm used to generate the codes then the next codes can be "predicted". And the algorithms are well know for some devices, such as garage doors, that is why "home-link" devices built into cars are able to work at all.

The recent speculation for how thieves are hacking into cars is that they have a device that can boost the signal sent from the car and send it all of the way into the house, and also receive the weak signal transmitted by the fob and amplify that and retransmit it to the car. This would allow anyone with such a device to open a car with a "smart" fob (one which you don't need to push a button on, just activate the car door or push a "START" button). I don't know if anyone has caught a crook with such a device but it seems like a reasonable attack.

Hedy’s patent

Hedy’s patent was for frequency hopping. To a large extent it worked because the complexity needed to defeat it was not achievable during WWII. It tends to be very spectrum inefficient, which is why other approaches are mostly used today. Cell phones mostly (maybe all) use code division multiplexing (CDMA); a different kind of spread spectrum. CDMA allows multiple devices to use the same channel simultaneously.

wow

this is horrible

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[URL=http://www.speedtest.net][IMG]http://www.speedtest.net/result/693683800.png[/IMG][/URL]

not hardly

zeaflal wrote:

Hedy’s patent was for frequency hopping. To a large extent it worked because the complexity needed to defeat it was not achievable during WWII. It tends to be very spectrum inefficient, which is why other approaches are mostly used today. Cell phones mostly (maybe all) use code division multiplexing (CDMA); a different kind of spread spectrum. CDMA allows multiple devices to use the same channel simultaneously.

Two carriers in the US use CDMA, Verizon and Sprint. Across the rest of the world, CDMA is infrequently used as GSM which was developed specifically for cellular communications is the predominate protocol. In fact, LTE has to be bastardized to run on CDMA.

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Illiterate? Write for free help.

simpler answer

Frovingslosh wrote:

The recent speculation for how thieves are hacking into cars is that they have a device that can boost the signal sent from the car and send it all of the way into the house, and also receive the weak signal transmitted by the fob and amplify that and retransmit it to the car.

The simpler answer is that some people are leaving these fobs *in the car*, particularly when there are multiple drivers of the same vehicle. So anyone who hops into the car can just take it. And they're not exactly telling their insurance company that their car's high-tech anti theft system was defeated because they all but handed the keys to the thieves.

Let's just use an old

Let's just use an old fashioned key

what you would like to believe is true

-Nomad- wrote:

The simpler answer is that some people are leaving these fobs *in the car*, .....

My post was based on what was shown in the original video, as well as subsequent coverage that stated the same on the national news (I saw a story on ABC that suggested the silly solution of leaving your keys in the freezer, where the metal shielding would prevent the attack, but I expect like all "news" lately, all networks covered the same thing in the same way). Your post seems to be based on your imagination and what you would like to believe is true.

Its not just cars.

Motorcycles have the "Keyless Entry" systems too. The system arms when I walk away. If I have the fob within 20 feet anyone can take the bike. The owners manual specifically says not to keep the fob in a metal box because it wont disarm the system. I keep the key in a metal box because I keep my keys about 10 feet from the bike. The spare is another metal box in another room. It works.

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d