Great way to start the day with a great laugh.

 
--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

and

pwohlrab wrote:

Police officer caught on dash cam shaking and dancing to Taylor Swift.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/trending/dover-police-dashcam-confessional-shake-it-off-officer-dances-to-taylor-swift

if it were you or me, we would have been ticketed for distracted and/or dangerous driving. That video would be used as an example of police officers employing a double standard when applying the law against distracted driving. The officer should be suspended as a punishment, not for doing the lipsyncing, but for doing it while driving and possibly putting others at risk. It sends the wrong message.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

@Boxcar

I was tempted to make the statement "The officer should be reprimanded/ brought up on charges". Not just the distracted part but also the fact that multiple times his hands weren't even on the steering wheel!

--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

staged

"The video was staged, said Mark Hoffman, spokesman for Dover Police Department. "This was done in fun," he added. Hoffman said the production took about 15 minutes to tape."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2015/01/17/das...

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

From the FB page of the

From the FB page of the Dover PD:(https://www.facebook.com/doverpd)

"We know our ‪#‎dashcamdiva‬ is being talked about by everyone, but one of our local newspapers has the best take yet on why the video was made and what our intentions were...we hope you enjoy this article as much as we did. Thanks for all of your support and keep shakin'"

http://www.delawareonline.com/story/onlyindelaware/2015/01/1...

Jeffrey Gentry, The News Journal 7:12 p.m. EST January 17, 2015

About 12 or 13 years ago, a year or so after I returned for this, my second stint at The News Journal, I received a call from a good friend and former co-worker at The Cecil Whig in Elkton, Maryland.

I was working on the night sports desk when she called to tell me she was at the scene of an accident – she's a photographer – and my youngest brother was involved in it. I could hear him scream in the background just as she ended a sentence.

It wasn't a quick, high-pitched you scared me scream.

It was a deep down that-hurt-like-all-get-out-you bleep bleepity bleep bleep kind of scream.

I've taken my share of photos at accident scenes over the years so a lot went through my head in a very short span of time.

My friend sensed that and said, as calmly as she could considering she was also friends with my brother, that it didn't appear life threatening.

The scream, she explained came as rescue workers were trying to get his legs free. The emergency brake pedal was stuck in one of them and one leg was broken near the ankle. A drunken driver had hit him nearly head on.

My friend told me they were going to fly him from the scene just south of Chesapeake City, Maryland, to Christiana Hospital. I called our parents and then left work, arriving at the hospital shortly after the helicopter. Our parents beat it there.

Thankfully – because of the work done by the volunteer firefighters, paramedics and police that night – my brother arrived at the hospital and was handed over to the care of the doctors and nurses.

This brother, the youngest of us four, always seems to get in the accidents. Years after one crash, pieces of glass are still working themselves out of his head. Again, the work of the first responders and those at the hospital made all the difference in the world.

I bring this up because people in positions of trust – people like firefighters, police, teachers, coaches, doctors – are put through a wringer when one of their own breaks that trust. Sometimes we tend to let the one or two bad apples make the whole bunch bad.

But even in the midst of allegations of a teacher having sex with a student in Delaware and continued fallout from the Ferguson, Missouri, and New York cases involving police killings of unarmed suspects, one simple thing this week renewed my belief in the good human qualities of the people doing these jobs.

One look at the viral video of the Dover police officer lip syncing and dancing around in the seat of his patrol car to Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off" was enough to set things right in my world. Prearranged and filmed mostly in a parking lot or not, publicity stunt or not, that hilarious ride-along helped wipe away some of the lingering images of bully cops.

Thanks Master Cpl. Jeff Davis and the Dover Police Department. I needed that.

And I'll bet I wasn't the only one.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Real Or Staged?

Real or staged, I enjoyed it.

--
Bob: My toys: Nüvi 1390T, Droid X2, Nook Color (rooted), Motorola Xoom, Kindle 2, a Yo-Yo and a Slinky. Gotta have toys.

yep

rlallos wrote:

Real or staged, I enjoyed it.

Yea it made me laugh that's for sure.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

This was a very good article of Mr. Gentry

soberbyker wrote:

From the FB page of the Dover PD:(https://www.facebook.com/doverpd)

"We know our ‪#‎dashcamdiva‬ is being talked about by everyone, but one of our local newspapers has the best take yet on why the video was made and what our intentions were...we hope you enjoy this article as much as we did. Thanks for all of your support and keep shakin'"

http://www.delawareonline.com/story/onlyindelaware/2015/01/1...

Jeffrey Gentry, The News Journal 7:12 p.m. EST January 17, 2015

About 12 or 13 years ago, a year or so after I returned for this, my second stint at The News Journal, I received a call from a good friend and former co-worker at The Cecil Whig in Elkton, Maryland.

I was working on the night sports desk when she called to tell me she was at the scene of an accident – she's a photographer – and my youngest brother was involved in it. I could hear him scream in the background just as she ended a sentence.

It wasn't a quick, high-pitched you scared me scream.

It was a deep down that-hurt-like-all-get-out-you bleep bleepity bleep bleep kind of scream.

I've taken my share of photos at accident scenes over the years so a lot went through my head in a very short span of time.

My friend sensed that and said, as calmly as she could considering she was also friends with my brother, that it didn't appear life threatening.

The scream, she explained came as rescue workers were trying to get his legs free. The emergency brake pedal was stuck in one of them and one leg was broken near the ankle. A drunken driver had hit him nearly head on.

My friend told me they were going to fly him from the scene just south of Chesapeake City, Maryland, to Christiana Hospital. I called our parents and then left work, arriving at the hospital shortly after the helicopter. Our parents beat it there.

Thankfully – because of the work done by the volunteer firefighters, paramedics and police that night – my brother arrived at the hospital and was handed over to the care of the doctors and nurses.

This brother, the youngest of us four, always seems to get in the accidents. Years after one crash, pieces of glass are still working themselves out of his head. Again, the work of the first responders and those at the hospital made all the difference in the world.

I bring this up because people in positions of trust – people like firefighters, police, teachers, coaches, doctors – are put through a wringer when one of their own breaks that trust. Sometimes we tend to let the one or two bad apples make the whole bunch bad.

But even in the midst of allegations of a teacher having sex with a student in Delaware and continued fallout from the Ferguson, Missouri, and New York cases involving police killings of unarmed suspects, one simple thing this week renewed my belief in the good human qualities of the people doing these jobs.

One look at the viral video of the Dover police officer lip syncing and dancing around in the seat of his patrol car to Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off" was enough to set things right in my world. Prearranged and filmed mostly in a parking lot or not, publicity stunt or not, that hilarious ride-along helped wipe away some of the lingering images of bully cops.

Thanks Master Cpl. Jeff Davis and the Dover Police Department. I needed that.

And I'll bet I wasn't the only one.

They do go through so much to help all of us.
The need all the laughter time they can get to deal with the sad time.
Thanks to all the people who look out for us.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

This is quite entertaining....

thanks for sharing.

--
RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

No hamburger

Well, he wasn't eating a hamburger, so I guess it wasn't in Georgia.

Chill Out

It was staged.

And it is still hilarious.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.