What Does Your Phone Know About You? More Than You Think

 

"Figuring that I've got nothing to hide or steal, I'd always privileged convenience over any privacy and security protocols. Not anymore."

shock

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/What-Does-Your-Phone-Know-atla...

"Even searching a suspect's house could never yield a full inventory of that person's friends and acquaintances, the entire record of their voice and text communications -- and all the web pages he'd ever looked at. Now, law enforcement or a government official can have all of that in two minutes and physical access to one's cell phone."

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It's about the Line- If a line can be drawn between the powers granted and the rights retained, it would seem to be the same thing, whether the latter be secured by declaring that they shall not be abridged, or that the former shall not be extended.

Read it already

Good old Michigan cops...

The article says the author put a PW on the phone. But, this program cracks it. See here: http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r25763642-Michigan-Police-Ex...

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

iPhone tracking

The app that comes with your iPhone and using your MobileMe account, besides giving you the ability to find your phone if lost, lets you wipe it clean remotely if necessary.

I wonder if the police can still recover information from it after you do that?

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If you don't know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else. - Yogi Berra

Probably

Last Mrk wrote:

The app that comes with your iPhone and using your MobileMe account, besides giving you the ability to find your phone if lost, lets you wipe it clean remotely if necessary.

I wonder if the police can still recover information from it after you do that?

I don't have one (smart phone) so I'm just guessing, but probably, unless the app does a NSA certified wipe!

We (the govt.) spare no expense in the name of security & punishing law-breakers!

But it doesn't bother me.. I abide by EVERY law ever written & still in force, as I'm sure most of us do as well. twisted

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It's about the Line- If a line can be drawn between the powers granted and the rights retained, it would seem to be the same thing, whether the latter be secured by declaring that they shall not be abridged, or that the former shall not be extended.

Just put a warning sticker on it...Problem solved

The fix for this problem of track-ability and privacy with cellphones, "smart devices" and GPS's is going to be a simple warning sticker on the device when sold.

The sticker will alert the buyer that the device is trackable in MANY ways some of which can not be supressed or opted-out. The manufacturer assumes no liability from, and all license to, that tracking data.

You can chose to buy the device or not....

What will be interesting is - will the police now consider that "agreement" (allowing your position to be freely broadcast in various multi-channel modes) the same as law enforcemnet's "plain view" doctrine?

If so, some day if you are pulled over for a busted tail-light, or failure to signal you might hear these words...

"License, Registration and CELLPHONE, please sir."

So, that your days activities (which are now considerd in "plain view") can be downloaded and checked.

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The best to way to deal with this is, say 'No'.

In asking for your device, what is the Probable Cause? Where's the warrant for the search, and seizure of the information?

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

If the information is

If the information is classifed as in "plain view" no probable cause or warrant is required.

Comply...or off to jail you go.

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Well, that may be arguable that it is in plain view. The info is not displayed openly as per a sheet of paper. You have to access it by interrogation methods. In this case, electronic interrogation via a program.

I can barely wait for the outcome of the first lawsuit! mrgreen

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Ummm...how about just turn it off if>>>

Juggernaut wrote:

The best to way to deal with this is, say 'No'.

In asking for your device, what is the Probable Cause? Where's the warrant for the search, and seizure of the information?

you get pulled over? Seems to me no siggies no scannie...just a thought. wink

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"You can't get there from here"

I can wait

If one goes out into their commuinty and openly transmits their position as they move about, on a device that they knew was transmitting their position.....then I would say at some point in time - law enforcement will make a vigorous argument that the sum of those actions are within the definition of "public view".

Accessing "bread crumbs" information via the personal device is simply information that "could have been obtained by other means".

Law enforcement currently does not need a warrant or probable cause to access the recorded view of a camera in a public location.

Think of your cellphone as the same thing...It is recording a "snapshot" of you as you move through a public place. You should have no expectation of privacy in regards to that "snapshot" taken knowingly in a public environment.

These are the arguments (I feel) law enforcement will make in the not too distant future.

However...

At present, my current and past locations, recorded by the network, have to be subpoenaed via the provider. The same with my call records, text messages et al.

The police want to circumvent this process as an irresistible convenience for themselves. This is like saying because I left y car unlocked, it's ok for a thief to take it.

That dog won't hunt.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

London Calling

Courts have historically granted "small inconvieniences" of the individual.....

DUI check-points slightly impeed freedom of movement and seizure to check for drunkeness.

More than one court has allowed law enforcement to attach GPS devices to citizens' vehicles without warrant; with the arguement that the device is simply aggregating "public view" information.

Is handing over your personal device for a 10-second interrogation "too inconvienient" for a court to stop it?

And sure a person might "own" their personal device, and the cell companies might "own" the server. But, nothing is being stolen....The airwaves between those two pieces of hardware (and the data gleaned from those airwaves) is basically one big public trunk line.

Once the cell companies notify the consumer that tracking is possible and can not be (in some instances) be turned off. Your license agreement with the provider no longer includes the expectation of "location privacy" as well as other privacies....you're effectively on a truck line in some respects.

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Well, if you want to hand over your cell, and abdicate your rights, feel free. The next thing you'll hear is, "Papers, please".

Myself, as long as they push harder to take what they think they have a right to, I'll buck the other way, and protect it to make it harder for them.

I don't leave my network open for a hacker, and this is no different. It seems the Gov has trained the sheep for slaughter very well.

Quote:

And sure a person might "own" their personal device, and the cell companies might "own" the server. But, nothing is being stolen....The airwaves between those two pieces of hardware (and the data gleaned from those airwaves) is basically one big public trunk line.

Do you realize what a great case this statement is for piracy? LOL!

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Good Luck With That!

My cell phone is a Motorola V360 from 2006. No "smart" features or any kind of tracking. Nothing to see here, move along!

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I support the right to keep and arm bears.

V360

I have one myself (a spare), and a great phone IMO.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Turn it off...

TMK wrote:
Juggernaut wrote:

The best to way to deal with this is, say 'No'.

In asking for your device, what is the Probable Cause? Where's the warrant for the search, and seizure of the information?

you get pulled over? Seems to me no siggies no scannie...just a thought. wink

The phones are never off. They just go into a standby mode and can still be tracked. You want the thing to be off you need to pull the battery out grin

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Garmin nuvi 1300LM with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 200W with 4GB SD card Garmin nuvi 260W with 4GB SD card r.i.p.