Experts Warn of 'Death by GPS' as More People Visit Remote Wildernesses

 
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Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

whit or without

By coincidence I’m just watching on Animal Planet the program “I Shouldn’t Be Alive” with the episode titled “Hike into Hell Canyon”

This lady did not have a GPS with her and made a wrong turn while hiking with her dog; she almost died when she lost her bearings.
An average of four people dies in the Canyon every year of dehydration.

Moral of the story carry a GPS but use common sense…

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Or take more water!

Or take more water!

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Give me a eTrex yellow

bear007 wrote:

Or take more water!

This lady was lost for 20 days, how much water you need to carry and survive that long? anyway she made it because she twice found water on the canyon floor, so fluids was not the main issue but food and the fact she didn't know how to get out. If it wasn’t for four Native Americans contracted by her family to do a ground search she would have never made it.

In retrospect she was S.O.L. back in 1975 when the incident happen the GPS constellation was sitting somewhere at a USDOD drawing board, the first satellite of the constellation went up in 1989 and the 24th in 1994

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

.

True. But, people still had brains back then.

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nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Old Fashioned Way?

When traveling into remote areas, it is advisable to take a good map and compass and to know how to use them. We still carry maps in the car and whenever we hike. They are invaluable, especially when the GPS fails.

Agreed

panama wrote:

When traveling into remote areas, it is advisable to take a good map and compass and to know how to use them.

Yes. GPS is a great aid, but it won't replace topographic experience, etc.

Learning land navigation, orienteering, pathfinding, et al. is a great idea, under controlled circumstances before you need it. Think larger groups, full preparation of gear, known time schedule and location, etc.

Even all these years later, I still pack the waterproof maps, good primary and smaller secondary compass, simple communications gear, etc. If it's remote enough, an ELT is not a bad idea either!

Absolutely agreed.

Bavar3 wrote:
panama wrote:

When traveling into remote areas, it is advisable to take a good map and compass and to know how to use them.

Yes. GPS is a great aid, but it won't replace topographic experience, etc.

Learning land navigation, orienteering, pathfinding, et al. is a great idea, under controlled circumstances before you need it. Think larger groups, full preparation of gear, known time schedule and location, etc.

Even all these years later, I still pack the waterproof maps, good primary and smaller secondary compass, simple communications gear, etc. If it's remote enough, an ELT is not a bad idea either!

Agreed, completely agreed--having a handheld GPS is a wonderful aid, but it is NOT a substitute for actual back-country orienteering training (including knowing how to prepare gear for where you are going and the conditions you will be facing, backup compasses, communications gear, ELTs for very remote locations, and some training in back-country survival in case the worst should happen--no, we're not expecting you to be Les Stroud, but know what to do if you get lost/injured/etc. in wilderness areas including LETTING FOLKS KNOW WHERE YOU ARE GOING AND WHEN YOU EXPECT TO RETURN).

Otherwise--whether it be a GPS or a compass--if someone doesn't have training in back-country exploration (including orienteering, preparation and survival) you might as well be going out as a babe in the woods (or the desert, quite literally). Without some basic knowledge of what you're getting into, a GPS--or ANY other orienteering device--could just get you into a whole mess of trouble.

Like the Boy Scouts (and the Girl Scouts) say--BE PREPARED.

(As an aside, and to get this right back relevant to GPS devices and their use in wilderness areas--a simple way for folks to gain proper orienteering skills with a GPS device, especially a handheld GPS or smartphone with GPS capabilities, is the growing sport of geocaching. Most geocaches are designed to be friendly to folks not used to heavy orienteering, there are even geocaches designed explicitly to be "family friendly" for folks with small kids, and--importantly--geocaching sites such as geocaching.com explicitly describe conditions at sites such as how hard it is to get to the cache, etc. Geocaching clubs can serve as a quick way to get some basic orienteering experience under the belt for folks who were never in Scouting or Outward Bound--or who were and are rusty or never used a GPS. grin)

Wow!

The was a interesting story. Some people rely on teleology way to much these days.

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A friend who hikes a lot

A friend who hikes a lot uses one of those GPS gizmos that has a "SOS" button so he can use it to call for help. It is satellite based. I forget what it's called. It seems pretty cool.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Yeah

nuvic320 wrote:

A friend who hikes a lot uses one of those GPS gizmos that has a "SOS" button so he can use it to call for help. It is satellite based. I forget what it's called. It seems pretty cool.

I've seen those things. People can track you on the net and you can call the calvary if you get in trouble with the push of a button.

yes

shadesofgrey wrote:
nuvic320 wrote:

A friend who hikes a lot uses one of those GPS gizmos that has a "SOS" button so he can use it to call for help. It is satellite based. I forget what it's called. It seems pretty cool.

I've seen those things. People can track you on the net and you can call the calvary if you get in trouble with the push of a button.

I found the link: http://www.findmespot.com/en/

It's pretty cool...my friend's device updates his status on Facebook that all is well, etc.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

delorme

nuvic320 wrote:
shadesofgrey wrote:
nuvic320 wrote:

A friend who hikes a lot uses one of those GPS gizmos that has a "SOS" button so he can use it to call for help. It is satellite based. I forget what it's called. It seems pretty cool.

I've seen those things. People can track you on the net and you can call the calvary if you get in trouble with the push of a button.

I found the link: http://www.findmespot.com/en/

It's pretty cool...my friend's device updates his status on Facebook that all is well, etc.

delorme has a new hand held gps that will connect to this.