Android phones - so awesome for travel

 

I'm currently in Vegas on a road trip. I used my Android phone to google locations, GPS to get to the places, and then do wireless wifi tethering on my Android phone to browse the web on my laptop, all for free (well nothing on top of my basic data plan).

This is amazing. smile

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work
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Android Incredible

I definitely love mine as well. Used it in Vegas as well to locate the Gold and Silver Pawn shop so that I could see where Pawn Stars was filmed.

Worked like a charm!

--
Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

Droid X

Have had my Droid X for about two weeks and it is absoutlely amazing....Love, Love, Love it.....

--
Bobby....Garmin 2450LM

.

I too am loving my android phone. Ever since I've got it I've left Jill (my garmin, not my wife!) in the drawer.

You guys may want to check out CoPilot Live. It's a gps app which stores the maps on your phone so you don't lose navigation if you lose a data signal. And it only costs $5!!!
www.alk.eu.com

I've been testing it out for a couple days now and while there are a couple of small things that could be improved, overall its a great navigation app.

I agree completely. I added

I agree completely. I added it ot my Droid and it is not quite where traditional gps units are, it is a great backup and does very well when I put it to the test.

How is accuracy?

I'm considering upgrading my 3 yr old Moto RAZR to a smartphone, and like the idea of the google maps/gps application - curious as to how accurate it is versus a standalone GPS?

Accuracy is not the Issue

squeege wrote:

I'm considering upgrading my 3 yr old Moto RAZR to a smartphone, and like the idea of the google maps/gps application - curious as to how accurate it is versus a standalone GPS?

The GPS is VERY accurate. The problem is not the accuracy. It is the algorithms utilized to compute the path from A to B. In other words, with my Garmin I can select the quickest path as opposed to the shortest path while avoiding such things as toll roads, dirt roads, etc. Also I can even put in what type of automobile so that it will favor larger or smaller roads.

The Android Garmin algorithms don't currently give you all these nice options.

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Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

Android OS

squeege wrote:

I'm considering upgrading my 3 yr old Moto RAZR to a smartphone, and like the idea of the google maps/gps application - curious as to how accurate it is versus a standalone GPS?

Very Accurate, your GPSR will become a backup unit.

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Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

not true

Holydoc wrote:
squeege wrote:

I'm considering upgrading my 3 yr old Moto RAZR to a smartphone, and like the idea of the google maps/gps application - curious as to how accurate it is versus a standalone GPS?

The GPS is VERY accurate. The problem is not the accuracy. It is the algorithms utilized to compute the path from A to B. In other words, with my Garmin I can select the quickest path as opposed to the shortest path while avoiding such things as toll roads, dirt roads, etc. Also I can even put in what type of automobile so that it will favor larger or smaller roads.

The Android Garmin algorithms don't currently give you all these nice options.

CoPilot Live 8 for the android OS utilizes algorithms that have all the above options you mentioned. In other words, with my Droid 2 I can select the quickest path as opposed to the shortest path while avoiding such things as toll roads, dirt roads, etc. plus different vehicle types such as Auto, Motorcycle, RV, Bicycle or pedestrian mode.

Too bad Garmin missed the boat with the Nuvi phone. Actually they should just have just made the best App they could, imagine 20 bucks times multiple millions of apps sold.
Wake up Garmin your about to lose your market to a telephone OS, it's not to late yet!

--
Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

NAVIGON MobileNavigator Android

Has anybody here tried NAVIGON MobileNavigator Android yet? It looks like the US version was just released. So for Android phones, if you want maps cached to the device you have the following choices:

-Copilot Live USA ($5)

-NDrive at ($20)

-Navigon MobileNavigator ($40 or so)

(Am I missing any other good contenders?)

http://www.alk.com/copilot/android/

http://www.ndriveweb.com/products/product/96/

http://www.navigon.com/portal/us/produkte/navigationssoftwar...

Free is still good

BobDee wrote:

CoPilot Live 8 for the android OS utilizes algorithms that have all the above options you mentioned. In other words, with my Droid 2 I can select the quickest path as opposed to the shortest path while avoiding such things as toll roads, dirt roads, etc. plus different vehicle types such as Auto, Motorcycle, RV, Bicycle or pedestrian mode.

Problem I am having BobDee is that I am loving FREE navigation. Not sure if I am ready to pay for it with CoPilot.

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Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

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Holydoc wrote:

Problem I am having BobDee is that I am loving FREE navigation. Not sure if I am ready to pay for it with CoPilot.

But one benefit of CoPilot is that the maps are downloaded to your phone. So if you lose cell coverage, you will still have gps directions. That's why I consider CoPilot to be a worthwhile backup to google maps.

Is there TomTom for Android

Is there TomTom for Android phones? Or any rumors if it may be released?

I'm assuming google maps

I'm assuming google maps does not have a caching option at this time?

.

squeege wrote:

I'm assuming google maps does not have a caching option at this time?

My understanding is that google maps automatically caches a small amount of the route. But there really isn't a way to cache the entire route.

no substitute

I have to agree that my Android is very handy for quick lookups and rudimentary directions, but I find that the routing is vastly inferior to my Garmin. It has me turning where there is no intersection, and taking side streets across town when the freeway is only slightly longer and much faster.

maybe not.

dave31175 wrote:

I have to agree that my Android is very handy for quick lookups and rudimentary directions, but I find that the routing is vastly inferior to my Garmin. It has me turning where there is no intersection, and taking side streets across town when the freeway is only slightly longer and much faster.

The routing is the same as google maps on the computer, or mapquest, or yahoo maps. Just because it's on a portable device doesn't mean it's any worse.

What's likely is you chose a wrong mode of travel. On Google Maps you can choose bus, pedestrian, car, train, etc etc. Make sure you're in the right mode.

Google maps has always been very reliable for me in routing, on the PC or phone. Whereas both the TomTom and Garmin has given me some funky routing that didn't make sense at times. The TomTom is far worse in this regard.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Not yet

Its a handy backup to have on a phone but I won't be putting my GPS in mothballs just yet. The Garmin starts to navigate a lot faster than my phone and the display is a lot more user friendly.

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Nuvi2797LMT (2) Nuvi260,Ford Sync3 Navigation. Captain Cook was a Yorkshire man too.

Came in Handy

this last trip I was on in Alabama showed exactly how nice it is to have a backup GPS unit. During our meeting, the host recommended a nice place for lunch. Not being familar with the area, it was hard for the host to explain how to find this place. I pulled out my Android and off we all went to the restuarant.

Another instance was when we went out to eat for dinner. While eating it got very dark and rainy. This mix in the weather caused us to miss our turn back to the interstate and we were stuck in a not so welcome part of town. Out came my phone, booted up navigation, and back to the hotel we went.

Again, I do not see it as replacing my Garmin, YET. But it will not be long.

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Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

Android

Android is the operating system right? What kind of phone are you all using? And I assume the battery is pretty heavily used in GPS mode.

Thanks Flip

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Flip Garmin Street P.330 Garmin 255WT Garmin LM50

battery

FLIP wrote:

Android is the operating system right? What kind of phone are you all using? And I assume the battery is pretty heavily used in GPS mode.

Thanks Flip

I have the EVO 4G from sprint with Android 2.2(soon 2.3)

about the battery question I just use the car charger that solve the problem,plus after I'm done with using the GPS feature I turn it off

Android Incredible

FLIP wrote:

Android is the operating system right? What kind of phone are you all using? And I assume the battery is pretty heavily used in GPS mode.

Thanks Flip

I use the HTC Incredible phone from Verizon. It is operating off of Android 2.2.

I also plug it in while using GPS if possible. If I was going on a long trip, I would definitely use the plug since navigation is a battery devourer!

--
Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

Where I Use GPS...

Your cell phone ain't gonna work.

Here in Idaho cell service is only around some highways. On the ATV rides you may get cell service on some mountain tops, but don't count on it.

--
If you ain't got pictures, I wasn't there.

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alpine1 wrote:

Your cell phone ain't gonna work.

Here in Idaho cell service is only around some highways. On the ATV rides you may get cell service on some mountain tops, but don't count on it.

If you had read the prior posts in this thread you would have noticed that they now sell gps apps which store the maps on the phone itself. So you can indeed use your cell phone as a gps device even if you lose cell coverage.

But I've discovered that a lot of folks on this site simply don't want to hear that a cell phone can replace their beloved garmin/tomtom.

reception

GadgetGuy2008 wrote:
alpine1 wrote:

Your cell phone ain't gonna work.

Here in Idaho cell service is only around some highways. On the ATV rides you may get cell service on some mountain tops, but don't count on it.

If you had read the prior posts in this thread you would have noticed that they now sell gps apps which store the maps on the phone itself. So you can indeed use your cell phone as a gps device even if you lose cell coverage.

But I've discovered that a lot of folks on this site simply don't want to hear that a cell phone can replace their beloved garmin/tomtom.

In Idaho, there are places where you not only do not get cell phones service but gps's do not work also.

LOL

blake7mstr wrote:

In Idaho, there are places where you not only do not get cell phones service but gps's do not work also.

LOL really? Why would a GPS not work?

Is the sky blocked or something? smile

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

Love my Android phone

Haven't used Google maps as a GPS yet. Garmin has been working great

line of sight

nuvic320 wrote:
blake7mstr wrote:

In Idaho, there are places where you not only do not get cell phones service but gps's do not work also.

LOL really? Why would a GPS not work?

Is the sky blocked or something? smile

they have this things called mountains and valleys, when you are in a deep valley, the signal can be cut off.

Better than the iPhone's navigation??

I prefer my Garmin over the iPhone's navigations, is the Droid that much better?

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Nuvi 360, OS X Lion 10.7

yes, android nav is far superior.

rkaufmann87 wrote:

I prefer my Garmin over the iPhone's navigations, is the Droid that much better?

Yes. Google Maps navigation is true step by step voice guided navigation. The iPhone navigation is a crude map.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

duh

blake7mstr wrote:
nuvic320 wrote:
blake7mstr wrote:

In Idaho, there are places where you not only do not get cell phones service but gps's do not work also.

LOL really? Why would a GPS not work?

Is the sky blocked or something? smile

they have this things called mountains and valleys, when you are in a deep valley, the signal can be cut off.

There are valleys and mountains in other places besides Idaho, just so you know, LOL.

And the newer GPS chips can get a good lock inside some very deep valleys.

But if you go under a building / bridge / tunnel then GPS won't work.

That's pretty obvious though.

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http://www.poi-factory.com/node/21626 - red light cameras do not work

duh back at you

nuvic320 wrote:
blake7mstr wrote:
nuvic320 wrote:
blake7mstr wrote:

In Idaho, there are places where you not only do not get cell phones service but gps's do not work also.

LOL really? Why would a GPS not work?

Is the sky blocked or something? smile

they have this things called mountains and valleys, when you are in a deep valley, the signal can be cut off.

There are valleys and mountains in other places besides Idaho, just so you know, LOL.

And the newer GPS chips can get a good lock inside some very deep valleys.

But if you go under a building / bridge / tunnel then GPS won't work.

That's pretty obvious though.

I'm aware of that, never said Idaho was the only place with mountains and valleys, I also used the descriptor 'DEEP' to describe the valleys, just the only place I have experienced a lost of gps signal. the only other place that might be similar would be cities like new york where you have a lot of tall buildings.

GPS App

This is a very good free gps app I have used on my Iphone as a backup to my Garmin. It has voice and some other good features. I have NO idea if it works on other phones like the Droid etc. The name is skobbler. It uses "openStreetMap" ,material.

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nuvi' 2450

Droid X

Its a nice looking phone!

--
Nuvi 660. Nuvi 40 Check out. www.houserentalsorlando.com Irish Saying. A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.

Got to tell you...

I have both a garmin and a droid..

It dependes what I need it for.. but I would never give up my garmin for anything. I use it all the time. The Droid, I use it only sometimes.. it is just to small and uses a lot of battery on the phone..

--
Bobkz - Garmin Nuvi 3597LMTHD/2455LMT/C530/C580- "Pain Is Fear Leaving The Body - Semper Fidelis"

Think I am going to try.

I am thinking of trying the Co Pilot app for Droid. I have a Droid X and think it looks like a good app to have. There is so many other things you can do other than navigation. Wish I would have bought it yesterday it was 1/2 off. Oh well.

Getting Better...

The Google Map interface on my 'droid is getting better. It now shows the next street name at the top and the current street name at the bottom like my GO930. It only has the estimated time enroute (in hours:minutes), not the estimated time at arrival (clock time).

The traffic is fairly accurate.

The routing is mostly OK. However, last night it tried to take me 4--wheelin' over a few curbs. confused Fortunately, I knew there was no road there and went another, more benign direction.

Also, the voice still leaves a lot to be desired.

And they keep adding new features. The new search menu is nice. For example, if you click on "Restaurants", it will then ask you what type (e.g., Mexican, Italian, etc.), then it will bring up all of those in your vicinity. Or you can always search in a particular city. When you select a restaurant, it will bring up the name, address, phone number and reviews (if any).

All-in-all, it is a good back-up; especially since I always have it with me. However, I still want my GO930 for long trips.

--
Shooter N32 39 W97 25 VIA 1535TM, Lexus built-in, TomTom Go

GPS units soon thing of the past.

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. The biggest reason why this is true is because of the decreasing features of the "simple feature" phones and soon everyone will have a smart phone. Standalone GPS units are sometimes easier to enter addresses and look up poi's but they can not be updated real time. If Garmin was smart they should get on the app bandwagon, ASAP! It is also much easier to use my Droid X because I only have one thing to carry around with me now and I don't have to worry about the GPS getting stolen, being in extreme temps, etc. JMO

let me get my crystal ball

mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

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Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Android Phones - So Awesome For Travel

Good point.

I own two motor vehicles, but every member in my family has a bicycle.

We also have two horses.

I think the reports of the death of the GPSr are a bit early yet

flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

When the smartphone GPSr apps can quickly tell me where Adam Richmond (Man v Food), Guy Fieri (Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives) have been, oddball tourist attractions, redlight camera locations, secret beaches, etc, etc, then I'll be happy to switch. As it is with my Sprint phone's GPSr right now I might get where I'm trying to get to--assuming that it's not something I'm just exploring for ideas.

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NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

GPSr will die at the hand of another GPS not a phone

IMO the death of automobile GPSr as we know it will not come about because of any phone application but rather at the hand of built in units in the vehicles.

In a day not far in the future built in GPS will stop being an extra option in the dashboard of the vehicle just like A/C, Radio, Cassette Player, CD player was, not long ago if you wanted any of those items it was optional and had to pay extra.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Watch Out

NEOhioGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

When the smartphone GPSr apps can quickly tell me where Adam Richmond (Man v Food), Guy Fieri (Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives) have been, oddball tourist attractions, redlight camera locations, secret beaches, etc, etc, then I'll be happy to switch. As it is with my Sprint phone's GPSr right now I might get where I'm trying to get to--assuming that it's not something I'm just exploring for ideas.

Watch out for those secret beaches.....!!!

--
Being ALL I can be for HIM! Jesus. Kenwood DNX9980HD Garmin 885t

Different strokes and all that

One thing where I do like using smartphones (and Android phones are particularly friendly here) as a GPS device is that--in the case of the smartphone--you can actually have different GPS tools running depending on what you're using it for.

For example, for driving, I'd prefer a conventional GPS program (like CoPilot or iGO--and yes, I still am disappointed that iGO for Android is OEM-only sad).

Walking around a town, on the other hand...I do tend to like good old Google Maps for this, in part because Google Maps ties in very nicely with public transportation databases in a lot of cities (including Washington metro and Chicago metro, areas I tend to visit rather frequently).

If I decided to go geocaching, there's other options still that are optimised for this (such as GeoBeagle or Geocaching.com's own Android app).

And there are still other tools you can use if you're actually making POI lists (there are, among other things, geolocation tools that can tag a photo with a lat/long combo and other info that can then be fed into a POI creator).

I think it largely depends on what one uses a GPS device for that will swing to "car GPS" versus "smartphone with GPS". Car GPS devices are still pretty stellar if your primary or only use for a GPS device is driving; if you use a GPS device for other things (such as city exploration or geocaching or geotagging) a smartphone tends to be the more convenient tool--assuming one doesn't want to carry around multiple GPS devices! grin

(I am most decidedly in the latter camp, but that's my own two pence--for the sort of things I do, a smartphone along with good GPS programs for the different "GPS user personalities" and a 12v-to-USB converter for long road trips tends to be the less expensive and more convenient option. For others, "car GPS" devices may well work better.)

If you have an Android or WinMo smartphone, they exist.

NEOhioGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

When the smartphone GPSr apps can quickly tell me where Adam Richmond (Man v Food), Guy Fieri (Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives) have been, oddball tourist attractions, redlight camera locations, secret beaches, etc, etc, then I'll be happy to switch. As it is with my Sprint phone's GPSr right now I might get where I'm trying to get to--assuming that it's not something I'm just exploring for ideas.

SOME smartphone GPS devices are starting to get to that point--however, this tends to be primarily in regards to Android and Windows Mobile smartphones, and unfortunately the WinMo smartphone is a dying breed thanks to WinMo 7 essentially having rendered that entire platform stillborn.

CoPilot for Android can supposedly take GPX files (I have not had direct experience with this, but I've heard reports from others that it does work).

If you're lucky enough to find an Android phone with iGO 8 installed or have a WinMo phone that you can purchase and install IGO 8 on--well, iGO 8.3 and above do happily take KML files as input, and Extra_POI_Editor does a wonderful job IMHO in converting CSV and GPX files here to KMLs for import.

For that matter, others have reported that if you've a stock Android with Google Maps that it IS possible to import KML files (converted from CSV and GPX files) to Google Maps. It's a bit more arcane a process than with CoPilot or iGO, though.

As for iPhones--I have no idea if there's programs for those you can import GPX or CSV files to. I'm not terribly impressed with them or how they're locked down; I prefer Android's approach to things (pretty much like Palm in their golden days when Handspring was making better Palm devices than Palm, or during the golden days of WinMo where you had your pickings of manufacturers...).

Also no idea what GPS programs exist for Blackberry or Maemo or other smartphone OS's, but I suspect nothing where you can add custom POIs razz

Apples/oranges vs. apples/super-apples

flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

TV could never replicate radio in all of its form factors. OTOH, smartphones are well on their way to including all the features found in a quality GPS in identical form factors.

Its only a matter of time!

One of the biggest reasons smart phones are taking over is because there is no fee to have updated maps, like in stand alone units and built ins. There are already apps that cover the speed and red light cams it is only a matter of time that there will be one to handle poi's. (Idea for someone!) Can a stand alone GPS look something up on the internet (most of the time). NOPE! Also this week Google Maps has been upgraded and allows offline route access and many other upgrades (I am not too sure on the specifics yet). Its only a matter of time!

Gets me Close

Though it is nice to have the GPS in the phone, so far it has only taken me "close" to the destination and never directly to it. Even though I placed in the street address, the android has taken me to within a block of the actual location. Luckily I have been able to see the destination from the spot it has taken me. I do not understand why it cannot be as accurate as my Nuvi since it is using Google Maps.

--
Garmin Nuvi 2699 with 2017.30 Maps

Is your GPS ON?

Holydoc wrote:

Though it is nice to have the GPS in the phone, so far it has only taken me "close" to the destination and never directly to it. Even though I placed in the street address, the android has taken me to within a block of the actual location. Luckily I have been able to see the destination from the spot it has taken me. I do not understand why it cannot be as accurate as my Nuvi since it is using Google Maps.

This looks like you're using 3G as the location information provider, obtaining an approximate location based on the cell towers around you. Verify that you have turned the GPS receiver on and allowed it to serve the applications (instead of just for emergency calls.)

Good news then, but still sounds like not ready for prime time

kusuriurikun wrote:
NEOhioGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

When the smartphone GPSr apps can quickly tell me where Adam Richmond (Man v Food), Guy Fieri (Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives) have been, oddball tourist attractions, redlight camera locations, secret beaches, etc, etc, then I'll be happy to switch...

SOME smartphone GPS devices are starting to get to that point--however, this tends to be primarily in regards to Android and Windows Mobile smartphones, and unfortunately the WinMo smartphone is a dying breed thanks to WinMo 7 essentially having rendered that entire platform stillborn...razz

That's a lot closer so good for phones. But--if the WinMo phone is where it's at, I'd rather poke a stick in my eye than use it as my GPSr. It's not good at anything: internet access speed, apps, nor even phone! When its synching any data its basically a brick until it finishes (you can't even make 911 calls during that time). So I've even resorted to manual syncs v automatic periodic. Maybe the day will come, but it isn't tomorrow.

--
NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps

You bet I do!

PastorMC wrote:
NEOhioGuy wrote:
flaco wrote:
mtunender wrote:

I think GPS units will be a thing of the past in the near future. JMO

I heard they said that about radio when TV came out...

When the smartphone GPSr apps can quickly tell me where...secret beaches, etc, etc, then I'll be happy to switch...

Watch out for those secret beaches.....!!!

After I downloaded this POI-Factory file http://www.poi-factory.com/node/5296 with secret beaches, I found one listed at a naval base that I often attend meetings at. Never knew it was there before that, and once I did, I always tried to find extra time to hang around after work to enjoy it.

--
NEOhioGuy - Garmin 2639, MIO Knight Rider, TomTom (in Subaru Legacy), Nuvi 55, DriveSmart 51, Apple CarPlay maps
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