Keep your virus protection up to date

 

Keep your virus protection and other computer firewall's etc. up to date. I had mine up to date and I was still the unhappy receiver of a RootKit (virus) that I was unable to get rid of. I actually went out and bought a new SSD drive to install XP onto. I do not know how I got my lucky hands on this rootkit but, from what I hear there has been ALLOT of it going around.

The plus side is installing the SSD (Solid State hard-drive) has sped up my boot time by quite a bit (less than a minute). I went with a smaller drive to coincide with my smaller budget! 32 gig $75 bucks after a rebate.

Only other issue is when installing software and configuring windows you need to carefully set things up so the swap files and program files are loaded on another standard drive. The drawback with SSD's is that they can actually wear out if there are too many "writes" to memory location.

Interesting process

Oh yeah - back your files up too - especially those pic that cannot be replaced!!!

Microsoft Security

Microsoft Security Essentials is a great product.

Thanks...

Thanks for the reminder... Been thinking about getting the SSD. hm... 32gig... Going back to the old days of making sure your main drive is not full of stuff to make it run faster..

computer root kits....

b25crew wrote:

Keep your virus protection and other computer firewall's etc. up to date. I had mine up to date and I was still the unhappy receiver of a RootKit (virus) that I was unable to get rid of. I actually went out and bought a new SSD drive to install XP onto. I do not know how I got my lucky hands on this rootkit but, from what I hear there has been ALLOT of it going around.
quote]

I was wondering what virus protection you were using and also what sort of rootkit you found? From some of the computers I have seen lately, there are a lot of items that is considered malware or spyware that most antivirus software will not catch.

I suggest to people to also run a malware/spyware program to help combat this issue.

SSD wearing out?

I understand that memory does go bad but I have never heard of a SSD "wearing out". This is usually a term for a mechanical drive, not a Solid State Drive since it has no moving parts.

bought a Macbook Pro on the

bought a Macbook Pro on the weekend, viruses are a thing of the past wink

Mac Too

I have been a Mac user since 1988. You can get a virus if you download bad content. I did it once foolishly thinking I was getting a free movie.

--
RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

Mac specific Virus's & malware on the rise

Fluxuated

Mac Virus's and malware are on the rise and you can get a free version of PC Tools iAntivirus for Mac. No reason to take any chance especially since it's free to use for home.

PC Tools iAntivirus detects and removes Mac-specific malware only. This can be either very good or very bad, depending on your perspective. While a Mac-only focus keeps iAntivirus running lighter and faster than other Macintosh antivirus software, it also means a Mac user could inadvertently share files infected with Windows-based malware. Macro viruses, for example, aren't detected by iAntivirus - corporate users sharing Office documents between Windows and Mac users will want to make sure macro virus protection on both sides is enabled.

PC Tools iAntivirus is currently in beta, supports Intel-based Mac OS X v10.5 only, and is free for home (or home office) use. Corporate users can purchase a license for approximately $30 which includes free 24/7 tech support.

Read more:
http://antivirus.about.com/od/macintoshresource/fr/iantiviru...
or download:
http://www.iantivirus.com/download/

Just trying to helpful
Bob

--
Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

.

A SSD doesn't "wear out" per say, but it does eventually go bad in a manner that makes one believe that its "wearing out". The 4k clusters in a SSD can only be written to so many times before they fail (can no longer be written to or can no longer retain data). Depending on how your drive is used, this could happen in a manner that is very noticeable; ie, little by little over a period of time you would notice that the drive is losing space because of bad clusters.

And both the classic Mac as well as the newer over priced PC component built, RedHat Linux derivative version of a Mac, are also prone to viruses. You just don't see them or hear about them that often because virus programmers target OSs that are more widely used for whatever purpose thier looking to get out of the system.

Interesting ad but totally not useful

The main advantage of the Mac's operating system OS X is there are zero (yes that is correct) virus's for Macs out there. The OS is strong enough that virus's are something Mac users simply do not have to worry about.

Antivirus software for Mac's is really for people that are used to having virus's on MS Windows machines and are paranoid. However these products at a minimum are a total waste of money and tend to create more issues with for Mac users then they prevent.

I'm not trying to start a Mac vs. PC (each to their own) conversation. I'm simply trying to set the record straight that Mac users don't need to worry about virus's because not only are there none to worry about their OS is designed with very high security in mind.

Roger

--
Nuvi 360, OS X Lion 10.7

No viruses, but be aware of trojans

Okay, so there are no viruses currently, but it is easy to misrepresent the truth beyond that. It's not exactly because the OS is so strong that it is not potentially vulnerable. Hackers have historically not written Mac viruses and that doesn't appear to be changing, but hacking/security conferences demonstrate existence of possible vulnerabilities. (One such example is the Pwn2Own Contest at CanSecWest where a hacker was able to take control in the matter of seconds after a link was clicked in Safari running on a fully patched Macbook Pro)

Trojans, such as those that install keyloggers are also a risk. Self-replication, self-installing viruses such as the Conflicker virus on Windows platforms seem to not be a risk and may never be.

Macs are secure, but some internet sense is important, especially if you frequent more questionable sites. Don't worry about installing antivirus software for the time being, but use your head. If for some reason the mac virus landscape changes, be prepared to install antivirus software. (If this becomes an issue, Apple will probably develop their own software and deliver it for free like Microsoft Security Essentials)

Getting a Virus

dockster wrote:

Microsoft Security Essentials is a great product.

I agree. Microsoft Security Essentials is great. I replaced my McAfee Anti Virus and also some adware software for Microsoft's product. I have been using it for years. I have never gotten a Virus or Spyware using this product. And best of all, it is free. Just go to http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/default.aspx.

--
Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

Yes, Free is good, but

I've always felt that based on Microsoft's track record, using Microsoft and security together in the same sentence --> creates an oxymoron. smile

--
Expect nothing!, appreciate benignity!

I had not heard about that

I had not heard about that free one from MS. Definitely looking into it. Thanks! I use McCaffee right now and no problems but I like things that are free....

Anti-Virus, Ad Blocker & Spy Terminator

I use Avira (free) Anti-Virus, ie:

http://www.free-av.com/

Have done so for years.. and haven't had a problem with a virus ever!

I also have and use LavaSoft (free) Ad-Aware, ie:

http://www.lavasoft.com/

to block ads being downloaded to my browser, as well as a (free) SpyWare Terminator, ie:

http://www.spywareterminator.com/

Using all three I find I'm pretty well safe to browse the web where ever I go.

Nuvi1300WTGPS

--
I'm not really lost.... just temporarily misplaced!

Thanks.

Thanks for the warning! I run malwarebytes, and Bit defender. Also Firefox with script control.

--
Nuvi 660. Nuvi 40 Check out. www.houserentalsorlando.com Irish Saying. A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.

.

rkaufmann87 wrote:

The main advantage of the Mac's operating system OS X is there are zero (yes that is correct) virus's for Macs out there. The OS is strong enough that virus's are something Mac users
Roger

http://www.iantivirus.com/threats/
http://macscan.securemac.com/spyware-list/

No viruses, eh? And those are just the known ones.

And we can argue about semantics on what is considered a virus, trojan, worm, etc, etc. But I'm sure we can at least agree that these are for the most part, malicious programs being installed and run on a system either unknowingly or against the users wishes.

Microsoft security essentials

Yeah I am running it on my new drive - recommended by a buddy (IT guru) that said it was the only thing that stopped this latest run of virus's Macafe and Norton did NOT catch it (I am / was running Norton) sad

Are you Serious?

rkaufmann87 wrote:

Mac users don't need to worry about virus's because not only are there none to worry about their OS is designed with very high security in mind.
Roger

In case you don't know it already, Mac OS got compromised 3 years in a row in a security contest.

http://arstechnica.com/security/news/2010/03/ie8-safari4-fir...

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/04/apple-patches-pwn2...

Microsoft

b25crew wrote:

Yeah I am running it on my new drive - recommended by a buddy (IT guru) that said it was the only thing that stopped this latest run of virus's Macafe and Norton did NOT catch it (I am / was running Norton) sad

I had the same problem. I have two PC's, one running MCafee and the other running Microsoft's software. McAfee found a spyware program but couldn't get rid of it. I loaded Microsoft's AntiVirus program onto the PC that had McAfee, it found it and removed it. I work in the IT profession as well and everyone I have talked to that runs the Microsoft product has never had a problem. There isn't a lot of bells and whistles with this free product, but it works great. It handles virus's, trojans, spyware, adaware, etc.

--
Larry - Nuvi 680, Nuvi 1690, Nuvi 2797LMT

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware

I used the free version of Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, it's working great. I would recommended.
Free update too.

AdBlock Plus

Irish FX4 wrote:

Thanks for the warning! I run malwarebytes, and Bit defender. Also Firefox with script control.

You may want to add it to the extensions as well. More and more malware is being served by ads.

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/1865

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Read this before you get to careless

Fluxuated wrote:

bought a Macbook Pro on the weekend, viruses are a thing of the past wink

Read this before you get to careless as to where you go:

http://antivirus.about.com/od/macintoshresource/Macintosh_Vi...

--
GM Built-in Navigation system - Samsung S6 Edge+ Smartphone with Garmin Viago, Google Maps & HERE Apps

HOSTS File

I also use a strong HOSTS file to keep me from accidentally getting to a "bad" website.

arrow http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm

--
Tampa, FL - Garmin nüvi 660 (Software Ver 4.90), 2019.30 CN NA NT maps | Magellan Meridian Gold

Malwarebytes etc.

I had and will have Malwarebytes - great program but, it could not get rid of this rootkit. Found it and said it was gone but, it was in the registry and I could not even manually delete it. Also running adaware and spybot search and destroy - did not slow this rootkit down!

Clean for now

Crew!

.

b25crew wrote:

I had and will have Malwarebytes - great program but, it could not get rid of this rootkit. Found it and said it was gone but, it was in the registry and I could not even manually delete it. Also running adaware and spybot search and destroy - did not slow this rootkit down!

Clean for now

Crew!

Bummer. If I were you I'd flatten and rebuild (format/reinstall) the system. I will never trust my computer once it got rootkit infection even if MBAM or any other software scan result says it's clean.

oxymoronic, maybe

Kwibbly wrote:

I've always felt that based on Microsoft's track record, using Microsoft and security together in the same sentence --> creates an oxymoron. smile

Security essentials works well. Its presence on a machine is barely noticeable. Makes one wonder why Norton and McAfee have thousands of registry entries and not that efficient.

I purchased the pro version

I purchased the pro version of Malwarebyte's Anti-Malware. It is a very great software. I use it with Kaspersky Internet Security together. It is better to security software with both firewall and antivirus functions rather than just antivirus.

And then again, maybe not

McAfee antivirus program goes berserk, freezes PCs

http://www.physorg.com/news191081048.html

--
ɐ‾nsǝɹ Just one click away from the end of the Internet

Yup..I was gonna post up

Yup..I was gonna post up about that.. grin

But..at work we caught it before we distributed the DAT.
(We use orchestrator so we control the releases)

Mcafee has pulled the junk before. And frankly I'm getting tired of stuff like this. And..their scanning engines have gone from bad to worse.

--
Nuvi 350 Born Oct 07 - Nuvi 660 Unit #2 (re)Born Sept 08 - Nuvi 360(Gift to 'the chick' yet maintained by myself) Born July 08

Eset NOD32

I've been using Eset NOD32 for over a year now. Its far better than McAfee, and Norton. It doesn't use as much resources, and scans fast. Microsoft Security Essentials and Avira are also good. I wouldn't recommend AVG. I know a couple of people who keep their definitions up to date and still were infected with root kits while using AVG.