Garmin Password

 

Is there anyway if my Garmin 885T is ripped off that it can be used if I have a password on it?

To my knowledge

No. But with that said, I've not had my hands on an 885T, but assume the password security is like the previous models. If the thief took it back to the place where you set the password, it would unlock without having to enter it. Otherwise, they would have to try 0000 - 9999 one at a time until they got it right, possible, but not very likely someone would stick with it that long.

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"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

There could be!

If the 885T is like other Nuvi models it could be used if it was turned on within about 50 feet of where you set the pincode. Inside that area the pincode isn't required, outside of it you do.

The other way for some one to use it of course would be to go through all of the possible 4 digit codes until the correct one was found. Not likely a thief would have the time or patience for this though.

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Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, DriveSmart 61, Garmin Backup Camera 40 and TomTom XXL540s.

Brick

There is a problem with trying every code possible. If you fail it 3 or 4 times the unit bricks and has to go back to Garmin.

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Nuvi 3790LMT, Nuvi 760 Lifetime map, Lifetime NavTraffic, Garmin E-Trex Legend Just because "Everyone" drives badly does not mean you have to.

What models started this?

onestep wrote:

There is a problem with trying every code possible. If you fail it 3 or 4 times the unit bricks and has to go back to Garmin.

What model did this start?

Daniel

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Garmin StreetPilot c580 & Nuvi 760 - Member 32160 - Traveling in Kansas

Interesting

I never heard of that before either.

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Nuvi 350, 760, 1695LM, 3790LMT, 2460LMT, 3597LMTHD, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, DriveSmart 61, Garmin Backup Camera 40 and TomTom XXL540s.

?

onestep wrote:

There is a problem with trying every code possible. If you fail it 3 or 4 times the unit bricks and has to go back to Garmin.

Where did you get that impression?

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Nuvi 660 -- and not upgrading it or maps until Garmin fixes long-standing bugs/problems, and get maps to where they are much more current, AND corrected on a more timely basis when advised of mistakes.

Sorry.

Too many toys and not enough sleep (4hrs) will do this kind of thing to you.

I was wrong.

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Nuvi 3790LMT, Nuvi 760 Lifetime map, Lifetime NavTraffic, Garmin E-Trex Legend Just because "Everyone" drives badly does not mean you have to.

Follow you!

The only way i can see a thief getting into you unit. Would be to follow you to you house after they have stolen it. Park out side your home and wait to see if it unlocks. Then they can change the password.
Not sure if it asks you to type in old password first before it will let you change it!

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Nuvi 660. Nuvi 40 Check out. www.houserentalsorlando.com Irish Saying. A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.

Bricks?!

While bricking sounds like a great thing if a thief takes your unit, but what about the unattentive spouse or child who just keeps trying the wrong PIN over and over???? I'd hate to send it back to Garmin every time.

Go ahead, ask me how I know...

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"For those who fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know."

Go ahead answer.......

drbillk wrote:

While bricking sounds like a great thing if a thief takes your unit, but what about the unattentive spouse or child who just keeps trying the wrong PIN over and over???? I'd hate to send it back to Garmin every time.

Go ahead, ask me how I know...

How do you know?

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Wanted -Woman with GPS -send picture of GPS

Old key required

Irish FX4 wrote:

The only way i can see a thief getting into you unit. Would be to follow you to you house after they have stolen it. Park out side your home and wait to see if it unlocks. Then they can change the password.
Not sure if it asks you to type in old password first before it will let you change it!

On my 770, even when unlocked (at the safety location) it will ask for the old key before it lets you remove it or change to a new one. So finding the safety location is only good to unlock when there. The thief will have to go back every time it restarts the unit.

lock

Well, I set mine when I first got it. I think its a good idea to use. I live in a college town with TONS of auto burglaries.

Password

I set it as soon as possible and wrote down where I set it (not at the front door) also set home base to a corner about a block away.

Nuvi360

Master reset

There are tutorials on the web on how to reset a pin using the master reset. I think the master reset is in a different place on each model type. Not 100% sure though.

--
Jesus died for your sins. If you don't sin, Jesus died for nothing.

Don't just say it, give us

Don't just say it, give us the link. AFAIK master reset clears user data. It does not disable PIN.

Hope your wrong,

onestep wrote:

Too many toys and not enough sleep (4hrs) will do this kind of thing to you.

I was wrong.

It would be very upsetting if the unit locks up after 3 or 4 incorrect entries. I could see a units program that locks the unit for one hour after 3 or 4 mistakes were made while unlocking the unit. Then allows for another 3 or 4 tries and another hour wait if not correctly entered. That would frustrate anyone trying to hack the pin.

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260, 295W, 1490T,2455LMT

Timing out unit is the standard way to thwart crack pass codes

But Garmin doesn't seem to think it's needed.

Passwords

I know there is controversy over this but I don't see any need for a password. It probably doesn't prevent someone from stealing your GPS, it just prevents them from using it which may give some satisfaction. On the other hand it complicates life as shown above.

O' bother.

Mike107 wrote:

I know there is controversy over this but I don't see any need for a password. It probably doesn't prevent someone from stealing your GPS, it just prevents them from using it which may give some satisfaction. On the other hand it complicates life as shown above.

I hope you do not have locks or any kind of latch on your front door to your home, according to you they would just slow you down, a nice resturant style dual direction door sounds like your style. I also hope you do not ever lock the doors on your car either as that can be a hinderance too. grin

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Nuvi 3790LMT, Nuvi 760 Lifetime map, Lifetime NavTraffic, Garmin E-Trex Legend Just because "Everyone" drives badly does not mean you have to.

Agreed

Mike107 wrote:

It probably doesn't prevent someone from stealing your GPS.

Agree with Mike. A thief isn't going to know whether there's a password lock on a GPS before breaking a window (or ripping through a convertible top) to steal the unit. Only after they're away from the vehicle will they likely try to turn the unit on. If it's secured they'll probably just throw it away. You've still lost the unit.

As others have mentioned, if you're concerned about someone finding your home based on the GPS just set that location at a corner, not at your driveway.

Cheers

--
Nuvi 760 & 660, Streetpilot, GPS III, GPS 10X

!

Gadgetjq wrote:
Mike107 wrote:

It probably doesn't prevent someone from stealing your GPS.

Agree with Mike. A thief isn't going to know whether there's a password lock on a GPS before breaking a window (or ripping through a convertible top) to steal the unit. Only after they're away from the vehicle will they likely try to turn the unit on. If it's secured they'll probably just throw it away. You've still lost the unit.

As others have mentioned, if you're concerned about someone finding your home based on the GPS just set that location at a corner, not at your driveway.

Cheers

Some people are directionally challenged. They couldn't find their way from the corner to their drive without a GPS telling them "You have arrived!"

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ɐ‾nsǝɹ Just one click away from the end of the Internet

And . . .

Gadgetjq wrote:

If it's secured they'll probably just throw it away. You've still lost the unit.

If 9 out of 10 units were locked, do you think thieves would continue stealing them knowing that they would only be able to use/sell 1 out of 10 units that they stole?

Going one step further, I think that if all the manufacturers forced a lock feature and it required a password every 20th time it was turned on, and anytime you tried to change the code, that thefts would stop entirely. Once they advertised that buying a stolen unit was fruitless, no thief could sell them.

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Nuvi 660 -- and not upgrading it or maps until Garmin fixes long-standing bugs/problems, and get maps to where they are much more current, AND corrected on a more timely basis when advised of mistakes.

Loose too many customers

If Garmin was to implement a forced password on my unit, they would loose me as a customer. I know it only takes a few seconds to enter a password, but I don't want to be bothered. I don't leave my GPS in the car anyway.

Garmin would have to change the method of their password system in order for a forced password system to work.

First, make it 8 digits. The current four digit system can be broken in matter of a few hours.

Second, devise a method to automatically unlock your GPS so you don't have to. Possible methods could include:

(1) Numeric entry of the password

(2) Bluetooth key (ie if the gps sees your cell phone)

(3) Multiple Secret locations. Set it near your house, work and other usual places so it unlocks when you go. You can not add or delete locations without knowning the actual password.

As a customer, I hate it when companies tell me how I want to use my device. Garmin knows that forcing a password will be too much for too many and they will loose customers.

As for Garmin, I am sure that they realize a lot of the GPS's they sell are replacements for stolen units. I am sure that they don't want to loose that extra profit. I doubt they will improve the very basic security already implemented in their GPS's.

Silly

I wish those folks talking about forced passwords would get in touch with reality.

Thieves don't think one second about whether a gps is locked. They steal the gps and then try to turn it on. If it works they turn around and sell it for $20. If it doesn't work they throw it in the trash.

If you don't believe me then talk to a local cop. Ask him what he thinks about passwords on gps devices and if they prevent thefts. If nothing else the cop will get a good laugh out of your naivete.

Password

All a password is really good for is to keep other people from playing with it, and changing setting or deleting things when they don't know what they are doing. (Especially if you may have young kids that like to turn things on and play with them) neutral smile

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

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bentbiker wrote:

If 9 out of 10 units were locked, do you think thieves would continue stealing them knowing that they would only be able to use/sell 1 out of 10 units that they stole?

Unfortunately, yes. Even if all GPS units were PIN protected, they'd still steal them. Never underestimate dumb criminals. They steal, period.

Do we get the satisfaction knowing that our GPS is unusable? Definitely.

Even if the thief doesn't

Even if the thief doesn't know the password, just losing the Garmin would be bad enough. 99.9% I take mine with me, even if I don't have a pocket to put it in. Would rather be safe than sorry. I am bad about taking the cord though. I do put it on the floor sometimes.

Good point!

jale wrote:

On my 770, even when unlocked (at the safety location) it will ask for the old key before it lets you remove it or change to a new one. So finding the safety location is only good to unlock when there. The thief will have to go back every time it restarts the unit.

Good point! I was not sure if it asked you for your old password in order for you to change it to a new one. As i have never changed mine since i set it up.

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Nuvi 660. Nuvi 40 Check out. www.houserentalsorlando.com Irish Saying. A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.

Probably

bentbiker wrote:

If 9 out of 10 units were locked, do you think thieves would continue stealing them knowing that they would only be able to use/sell 1 out of 10 units that they stole?

Probably. If was locked, they would probably just try and sell it to somebody who didn't know any better! Or smash it on the sidewalk.

Youtube

I didn't know how everyone would respond to the information. So I didn't post where I found the information. Youtube has the best tutorials though. (Each model has a different way to reset.) And the options for resetting a pin is also in the menu.

I'd test it on mine (again) but it's not here atm.

--
Jesus died for your sins. If you don't sin, Jesus died for nothing.

.

Sundive wrote:

Youtube has the best tutorials though. (Each model has a different way to reset.) And the options for resetting a pin is also in the menu.

I'd test it on mine (again) but it's not here atm.

You mean youtube video like the one posted at:
http://www.poi-factory.com/node/22803

Sorry, I don't see anything in that video that shows the PIN gets reset. All it shows is how to do a master reset. That's not a secret. Garmin has that info in their FAQ. You don't need youtube tutorials.

If you have other youtube links, I'd like to see it. Also, if you manage to test it successfully on your Garmin, I'd like to hear it.