have you ever had a knife sharpened professionally?

 

I'm gonna give it a try. We have knives from 2004 that are dull.

I tried running them through the device that has 2 sets of grooves for sharpening, no dice.

I happened to find an old, unused knife, so that being the reference, wow. It's dangerous.

The one in question, can't even cut through a whole onion--also dangerous. The good one is super sharp. Skin comes off when I run my finger over it. The other, it's like a massage to my finger.

Online says only $4.50, at a local shop? Hope they get the knife back as it was.

Knife

Yes, by the company that made it, free sharpen but had to pay shipping.

--
Peter Dutcher

John, I'm not sure why but I

John, I'm not sure why but I always had the impression you live in the Philadelphia area. I you are anywhere near, or wish to take a drive, I've used Brandywine Sharpening in Honey Brook PA. It's an Amish owned company and the quality of the workmanship is great.

See https://www.brandywinesharpening.com/ for the contact details.

--
John from PA

Buck Knives

I'm planning to return my Buck 110 folder knife for a "SPA" treatment.

From watching some YouTube videos who received the spa treatment, it comes back almost new.

https://youtu.be/jRBdz6r08YQ

Here's their website info..

https://www.buckknives.com/about-knives/bucks-forever-warran...

Not too much $ to get an almost new looking, new edge knife.

Love Buck Knives. Cheers!

--
Nuvi 755T,1350(2),265W,3760,2595(2),42,250

.

I sharpen my own with stones. Once sharp, it takes very little time, and effort to do maintenance. 5 minutes, maybe.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

Spyderco sharpener

I used to sharpen blades by hand and thought I did a good job. Sharpening required concentration to do a good job. A few years ago I bought a Spyderco sharpener ( https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details/204MF/Tri-Angle-Sha... ) and now I no longer need to concentrate and can sharpen while watching the TV news.

This isn't a comment about TV news!

Less pricy alternative,

minke wrote:

I used to sharpen blades by hand and thought I did a good job. Sharpening required concentration to do a good job. A few years ago I bought a Spyderco sharpener ( https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details/204MF/Tri-Angle-Sha... ) and now I no longer need to concentrate and can sharpen while watching the TV news.

This isn't a comment about TV news!

See https://www.amazon.com/SHARPAL-101N-Knife-Sharpener-Survival...

--
John from PA

No

I have several sharpening stones, sharpen my knives myself.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone 12, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Sharpening my knives

I have a set of Arkansas stones and the do a great job.
If you get the kit, it comes with honing oil
you can look up how to do it on you Tube

--
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!

If you listen to enthusiasts

John from PA wrote:
minke wrote:

I used to sharpen blades by hand and thought I did a good job. Sharpening required concentration to do a good job. A few years ago I bought a Spyderco sharpener ( https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details/204MF/Tri-Angle-Sha... ) and now I no longer need to concentrate and can sharpen while watching the TV news.

This isn't a comment about TV news!

See https://www.amazon.com/SHARPAL-101N-Knife-Sharpener-Survival...

If you listen to enthusiasts those kind of devices take off too much steel. I don't know if they can handle serrations.

No.For kitchen knives, use

No.
For kitchen knives, use a sharpening steel like thousands of cooks do every day. Everytime I pick up the Chef knife or any of the others in the set, I give it a few swipes on the steel. Keeps them sharp. A dull knife is a sure way to cut yourself. This is not rocket science.

My Buck 110 (some 50+ years old) and the 119 get sharpened on the whetstone.

--
I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

burr

KenSny wrote:

No.
For kitchen knives, use a sharpening steel like thousands of cooks do every day. Everytime I pick up the Chef knife or any of the others in the set, I give it a few swipes on the steel. Keeps them sharp. A dull knife is a sure way to cut yourself. This is not rocket science.

My Buck 110 (some 50+ years old) and the 119 get sharpened on the whetstone.

I don't know if you are replying to me. (I wish more people would use the "quote" function.)

The definition that I mean for burr is: "a protruding ragged edge raised on metal during drilling, shearing, punching, or engraving" from https://www.thefreedictionary.com/burr .

My understanding is that you use a steel (or a ceramic version) to raise the burr to complete the edge. You use a stone (or equivalent) to profile the edge to between 30° to 40°. You perform this before using the steel.

I hope I've been clear.

Yep

diesel wrote:

I have several sharpening stones, sharpen my knives myself.

I finish the edge on a strop, with fine jeweler's rouge. You can shave arm hair with it.

--
nüvi 3790T | nüvi 775T | Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable ~ JFK

happy now?

minke wrote:

I don't know if you are replying to me. (I wish more people would use the "quote" function.)

Replying to the OP, since it seemed he was talking about kitchen knives.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

I have the Wicked Edge Sharpener

do it myself, razor sharp every time.

--
"You can't get there from here"

Sharpened by Professionals

Yes, we have had our knives professionally sharpened and our scissors, too. They put a good sharp edge at the correct angle for our knives. It was not expensive and with proper care, the sharpening should last over a year.

yes

John from PA wrote:

John, I'm not sure why but I always had the impression you live in the Philadelphia area. I you are anywhere near, or wish to take a drive, I've used Brandywine Sharpening in Honey Brook PA. It's an Amish owned company and the quality of the workmanship is great.

See https://www.brandywinesharpening.com/ for the contact details.

I do and thanks for the tip! I've always heard if in need of cabinets, to have them made by the Amish. Not cheaper, but same, and much better than a HD etc. Funny we've been using the main knife dull for a while now I guess...

I do

KenSny wrote:

No.
For kitchen knives, use a sharpening steel like thousands of cooks do every day. Everytime I pick up the Chef knife or any of the others in the set, I give it a few swipes on the steel. Keeps them sharp. A dull knife is a sure way to cut yourself. This is not rocket science.

My Buck 110 (some 50+ years old) and the 119 get sharpened on the whetstone.

Always use the steel.

I have to wonder, if the sharpener we have is the wrong angle? And I also thought I read that European and Japanese are slightly different? Both the knife and the sharpener are German, although I don't believe the sharpener was made in Germany as the knife was....because it seems worse after using it...

I'm a DIY guy (but increasingly lazy as the years go by)

Tried a few different methods, then decided the Chef's Choice Trizor XV sharpener was for me.

They go for about $100 if you catch them on sale and leave knives hair-popping sharp.

After initial edging, just takes a couple seconds and a few swipes to keep the knives sharp before every use. Very little work involved, which is music to my ears.

Sharpening

johnnatash4 wrote:

Always use the steel.

I have to wonder, if the sharpener we have is the wrong angle? And I also thought I read that European and Japanese are slightly different? Both the knife and the sharpener are German, although I don't believe the sharpener was made in Germany as the knife was....because it seems worse after using it...

Steels do not sharpen knives, they only straighten the edge. Asian knives have an angle of 15 degrees while German knives are set at 20 degrees.

--
ChefDon

agreed

ChefDon16 wrote:
johnnatash4 wrote:

Always use the steel.

I have to wonder, if the sharpener we have is the wrong angle? And I also thought I read that European and Japanese are slightly different? Both the knife and the sharpener are German, although I don't believe the sharpener was made in Germany as the knife was....because it seems worse after using it...

Steels do not sharpen knives, they only straighten the edge. Asian knives have an angle of 15 degrees while German knives are set at 20 degrees.

Yes on the steel straightening the edge..

Why I think there is a skill to sharpening, is that I remember back in the day not having good luck with skis....I think of the sharpener as one size fits all, removing human's "feel" if you will. I know nothing! I'm just going by what I think I see, and I bet the pro will have it good as new...

Pro sharpening

This thread is heating up and has the makings of breaking out into a nasty street fight with shivs flashing, so I'm not going to weigh in on the merits of various ways to sharpen blades.

It reminds me, though, that back in the 1990s, a peddler with a pushcart came down our street calling out for knives to be sharpened. What he was doing on that quiet suburban cul de sac street in the 1990s, long after Fuller Brush and Avon had stopped cold calling, I can't say. But he sharpened knives to hair-splitting precision, for a negotiated price of a few dollars per blade. I miss him. So yeah, John, pro is a good way to go.

--
"141 could draw faster than he, but Irving was looking for 143..."

horse drawn knife sharpener

Lost Anyway wrote:

This thread is heating up and has the makings of breaking out into a nasty street fight with shivs flashing, so I'm not going to weigh in on the merits of various ways to sharpen blades.

It reminds me, though, that back in the 1990s, a peddler with a pushcart came down our street calling out for knives to be sharpened. What he was doing on that quiet suburban cul de sac street in the 1990s, long after Fuller Brush and Avon had stopped cold calling, I can't say. But he sharpened knives to hair-splitting precision, for a negotiated price of a few dollars per blade. I miss him. So yeah, John, pro is a good way to go.

In the late 40s and early fifties I remember a horse drawn knife sharpener who had a white stone wheel I guess 18 or 20 inches in diameter. This was in Brooklyn. I kinda-sorta thimk [sic] that it was pedal powered but I really don't remember.

knives

I bought a set of arkansas stones in Aus where they are expensive and rare, and practiced, and had to leave them when I came to canada. My brother loves them still 20 yers after I moved, and 30 years after I bought them
Now I have another set here, (they cost about 1/4 as much without air freight) and a diamond steel for touchup between slices
I think I'm ok at it, but occassionally my son in law uses my kitchen and when he's done, every knife is spectacular sharp
he's a butcher; the reducing a carcass to meat kind, not the that'll be $9 miss kind
at least he doesn't bring his own stones to my house, as he does everyone else

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If only ..

Of Steels and stories

I remember that the cook in my living group in college used his steel many times a day--seemingly in spare moments. I think he believed he was sharpening his knives, not just deburring or straightening them.

For a little while Chef's Choice was pushing a power sharpener in their line in which the center station was a non-moving arrangement meant to give the result of steeling. They asserted that the benefit was not perfect uniformity, but rather a specific sort of non-uniformity helpful in such matters as getting through the skin of some vegetables. I find myself no longer using that slot.

Meanwhile, it is currently widely preached as known truth that steels don't sharpen knives at all. My personal opinion is that has to depend on whether the "sharpening steel" has higher hardness than the particular knife. Whichever is harder will wear a bit of material off the other, however slowly.

On looking around, I found a post by someone with access to testing equipment, a small assortment of sharpening steels, and several knives.

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/187/Knife-and-Sha...

Behold, the sharpening steels were harder than the knives. In some pairings the difference was large. I think the common claim that sharpening steels can't/don't sharpen needs to be reeled back a little.

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personal GPS user since 1992