what's the worst inflation you've seen?

 

At work, I've seen 100% price increase on a subscription based software, but generally price increases of 5% across the board, which is not good, but tolerable.

I know there are many examples now.

But I was on amazon and came across the Noco battery terminal felt protectors that I paid 97 cents for last year. Amazon is selling them now for $9.89? lol

Will they ever come back to < $1?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001DKUTR0/ref=ppx_od_dt_b...

Anything listed as "Prime"

Anything listed as "Prime" on Amazon is going to be more money, and prime isn't what it used to be. A prime benefit is 'free' shipping, but it really isn't. Here's pretty much the same item at Walmart, plus it comes with a spray, $3.97, great price right, well unless you're buying at least $35 worth of stuff the shipping brings it up to prime's price, minus 2 cents. So Amazon just puts the shipping cost in the base price instead of as an add on.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/NOCO-NCP2-MC101-Battery-Terminal-...

Used to be I'd shop on Amazon and really not give it much thought for most things. Now I always try a few other places too.

So Amazon is where i've seen the most inflation on stuff I buy on a regular basis. That, and the price of gasoline has gone up about $.40 in the past week or so.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

My biggest issue with amazon

My biggest issue with amazon is all the fake products and product commingling. You never really know what you're getting until the product is in your hands.

I do not buy any storage media (flash memory) as this is the worst. Hard drives are also a no no. Not because of fakes but because amz doesn't know how to package them properly.

Re Prime, I think there's different grades of it. We used to get prime products delivery 11am-3pm. Now it's more like 8-10pm, at least with the trial prime.

Worst inflation I've seen?

Simple, I've a,tire that had a slow leak.

Every time I'd inflate it, it would still go flat!

--
Never argue with a pig. It makes you look foolish and it anoys the hell out of the pig!

Amazon sells a lot of fungible goods (it's a legal term)

zx1100e1 wrote:

My biggest issue with amazon is all the fake products and product commingling. You never really know what you're getting until the product is in your hands.

I do not buy any storage media (flash memory) as this is the worst. Hard drives are also a no no. Not because of fakes but because amz doesn't know how to package them properly.

Re Prime, I think there's different grades of it. We used to get prime products delivery 11am-3pm. Now it's more like 8-10pm, at least with the trial prime.

Totally in agreement here! I would not buy any cards from Amazon, counterfeit cards are common. I have written this before and I’ll quote it again.

“Actually just because they are filled and shipped by Amazon doesn't give you a good guarantee they are genuine.

It is my understanding by a neighbor (a Best Buy Manager) that Amazon sells the same product from many vendors, and the ordering system handles the sale. So let's say I give Amazon 100 counterfeit copies of a brand XYZ 32 GB SD card to sell for me. Amazon also buys direct from the importer 100 copies of the genuine brand XYZ 32 GB SD card for sell under the conditions filled and shipped by Amazon. All the cards labeled as brand XYZ are placed in the same stock bin and the computer simply handles who made the purchase and a robot (most likely) draws the card from the bin. But in this example you have 50/50 chance of getting a counterfeit card.

Amazon regards the products as fungible, meaning that an SD card made by brand xyz is the same regardless of who is selling it. Further, if a warehouse in Brooklyn runs out of stock of the brand xyz 32 GB cards, the order may be filled from a warehouse in Harrisburg PA regardless of who has supplied the cards in any given bin.

So buyer beware on these small commodity type of items; you may not know what you get, until you get it!

Now my same neighbor tells me that Best Buy at the Corporate level purchases thousands of cards every year, and they purchase them direct from the importer. They are then disseminated downward to the individual stores based on the BB inventory system. There isn't any unknown middle person, the card is supplied from importer >> Best Buy Corporate >> local Best Buy store. The odds are much higher in this scenario to get the genuine article.

Also, Amazon I think has recently changed some return procedures. I recently purchased something ($8) that was made of fabric with the some grommets. The fabric was ripped around the grommets. I had to return the item to a local Whole Foods before they would issue a credit.

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John from PA

I haven't bought and microsd

I haven't bought and microsd cards recently but plenty of 32/64GB flash drives, either sandisk or sandung from newegg. That is, sold and shipped by newegg. Those seem to be legit too.

Newegg just as bad as Amazon for many items.

zx1100e1 wrote:

I haven't bought and microsd cards recently but plenty of 32/64GB flash drives, either sandisk or sandung from newegg. That is, sold and shipped by newegg. Those seem to be legit too.

I would not buy memory cards from Newegg and for the same reasons I’ve outlined about not buying from Amazon. Sold and shipped by Newegg means little, all the cards are likely in the same bin and grabbed, packaged and shipped.

For a $15 card on Amazon, you’ll like pay $17 at Best Buy or one of the big online camera stores like Adorama or B&H.

--
John from PA

I bought a bunch of

I bought a bunch of rechargeable NiMH batteries from Amazon on sale. I specifically chose, and paid more for, the ones listed as "Made in Japan". 5 boxes of them arrived - all "Made in China".

I talked to Customer Support - first they didn't even recognize the problem, even though their own site was full of reviews saying the Chinese ones were hopeless compared to the Japanese, and secondly they said they couldn't ship me replacement ones listed as "Made in Japan" and guarantee that that was what I would receive. They did offer to cancel the sale and let me keep the Chinese ones, which I did.

Even for free the reviews were right, the Chinese ones are crap - TV remote has to be recharged every two days. In future I'm going to look for Eneloops - and they won't be bought on Amazon.

.

John from PA wrote:

~snip~

“Actually just because they are filled and shipped by Amazon doesn't give you a good guarantee they are genuine.

~snip~

Also, Amazon I think has recently changed some return procedures. I recently purchased something ($8) that was made of fabric with the some grommets. The fabric was ripped around the grommets. I had to return the item to a local Whole Foods before they would issue a credit.

The one good thing about "filled and shipped by Amazon" is total no questions asked returns, and a lot of the time for the less expensive items they'll give you credit and tell you to keep the item.

Also, about returns, I've noticed a lot more choices now, I've never run into a situation where I "had" to return via a specific place. I can simply take it to a couple places not boxed hand it off let them scan a code, they box and ship it and my refund is in my Amazon account by the end of the day, or returned to my payment source in a few days. I can also box it myself and print a free return label, normally for UPS.

My only gripe, as I mentioned before, is the word PRIME today doesn't mean what it used to mean as far as shipping goes, no longer a two day guarantee. Sometimes it's two days from when it's processed, which can add a few days to it, on the flip side I've placed an order in the morning had the item before dinner time.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Agree on the packaging...

zx1100e1 wrote:

...I do not buy any storage media (flash memory) as this is the worst. Hard drives are also a no no. Not because of fakes but because amz doesn't know how to package them properly...

I purchased a few 8 TB Hard drives from them. One came, or rather the heat sealed package arrived but there was no drive inside. There was a large gap in one of the heat sealed seams where the drive came out. Fortunately for me, the postmaster stamped the envelope "Arrived open" and signed it in two places. After submitting a claim with pictures and waiting a month, I finally got a refund. Luckily for me, the drive price increased $50 in that time frame. rolleyes

--
Striving to make the NYC Metro area project the best.

I agree....

the price creep on Amazon has been terrible. I now always check Walmart & Target before pulling the trigger on Amazon.

--
RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

inflation?

I thought this was gonna be about inflation, not buying from Amazon. grin

Anyone that lived through the late 70s and mid 80s just shakes their head at what's now called high inflation. I well remember buying my first house, actually condo, in 1985 with a 12 or 13% fixed mortgage. And it had dropped several percentage points to get down to that. I also remember refinancing down to about 9.5% a few years later and thinking that it couldn't drop much lower than that. grin

I am afraid you haven't seen

I am afraid you haven't seen anything yet and will be worse than the Jimmy Carter days of the 18% prime rate. Interest rates are being kept artificially low right now, which you can do in the short term. The bills for the pandemic are coming due and for every dollar printed, all dollars in circulation are de-valued. I really feel for the next several generations that will be paying the most for reckless spending, there is a limit that an economy can absorb.

batteries are "fungible"

gpsaccount wrote:

I bought a bunch of rechargeable NiMH batteries from Amazon on sale. I specifically chose, and paid more for, the ones listed as "Made in Japan". 5 boxes of them arrived - all "Made in China".

I talked to Customer Support - first they didn't even recognize the problem, even though their own site was full of reviews saying the Chinese ones were hopeless compared to the Japanese, and secondly they said they couldn't ship me replacement ones listed as "Made in Japan" and guarantee that that was what I would receive. They did offer to cancel the sale and let me keep the Chinese ones, which I did.

Even for free the reviews were right, the Chinese ones are crap - TV remote has to be recharged every two days. In future I'm going to look for Eneloops - and they won't be bought on Amazon.

Batteries are a good example of a fungible good. A laymen's definition of fungible is "Fungible goods are items that are interchangeable because they are identical to each other for practical purposes."

So a bin can have a 100 of brand xyz made in Japan AA batteries and 100 brand xyz made in China and as far as Amazon is concerned they are the same. A robot pulled from stock and as smart as the robot is, it could care less about China or Japan.

This is likely to only happen with relatively low priced items.

--
John from PA

amazon

soberbyker wrote:
John from PA wrote:

~snip~

“Actually just because they are filled and shipped by Amazon doesn't give you a good guarantee they are genuine.

~snip~

Also, Amazon I think has recently changed some return procedures. I recently purchased something ($8) that was made of fabric with the some grommets. The fabric was ripped around the grommets. I had to return the item to a local Whole Foods before they would issue a credit.

The one good thing about "filled and shipped by Amazon" is total no questions asked returns, and a lot of the time for the less expensive items they'll give you credit and tell you to keep the item.

Also, about returns, I've noticed a lot more choices now, I've never run into a situation where I "had" to return via a specific place. I can simply take it to a couple places not boxed hand it off let them scan a code, they box and ship it and my refund is in my Amazon account by the end of the day, or returned to my payment source in a few days. I can also box it myself and print a free return label, normally for UPS.

My only gripe, as I mentioned before, is the word PRIME today doesn't mean what it used to mean as far as shipping goes, no longer a two day guarantee. Sometimes it's two days from when it's processed, which can add a few days to it, on the flip side I've placed an order in the morning had the item before dinner time.

amazon has many bad prices, and many good ones.

disclaimer: I own the stock, I am a prime member

It is not wise to order from amazon without googling the item to do a reality check. that isn't supposed to be conducive to becoming a successful business, but they are.

On Dewalt tools? I have gotten killer prices from amazon themselves, and they are authorized. For example, the 20v car polisher was $158--HD was like $220, and some of the authorized etailers even more. Deal of the day.

I do think that I got the battery washers for 97 cents amazon prime, and they were $9.xx, is bordering on being unethical. But I don't want my stock to suffer hahahahahahahaha

Now, Costco. I own the stock, I am a member, and I am a fanboy. I do not need to price check them, if their item is on sale. Period. They're 20 bil shy of catching Walmart, who is terrible, BUT, I also trust their regular prices and I do shop there.

Stuff like the trailer hitch and bike rack? Walmart smacked amazon like no tomorrow (Allen locking 4 bike trailer hitch rack was $103 when amazon was $150 and went up to $200 lol).

my .02

Amazon batteries

John from PA wrote:
gpsaccount wrote:

I bought a bunch of rechargeable NiMH batteries from Amazon on sale. I specifically chose, and paid more for, the ones listed as "Made in Japan". 5 boxes of them arrived - all "Made in China".

I talked to Customer Support - first they didn't even recognize the problem, even though their own site was full of reviews saying the Chinese ones were hopeless compared to the Japanese, and secondly they said they couldn't ship me replacement ones listed as "Made in Japan" and guarantee that that was what I would receive. They did offer to cancel the sale and let me keep the Chinese ones, which I did.

Even for free the reviews were right, the Chinese ones are crap - TV remote has to be recharged every two days. In future I'm going to look for Eneloops - and they won't be bought on Amazon.

Batteries are a good example of a fungible good. A laymen's definition of fungible is "Fungible goods are items that are interchangeable because they are identical to each other for practical purposes."

So a bin can have a 100 of brand xyz made in Japan AA batteries and 100 brand xyz made in China and as far as Amazon is concerned they are the same. A robot pulled from stock and as smart as the robot is, it could care less about China or Japan.

This is likely to only happen with relatively low priced items.

I know what they're doing, but they shouldn't advertise them as different products - at different prices - if they're not going to fulfill them that way. As far as I'm concerned it's either lousy business practices or straightforward 'bait and switch'. Either way I'm done with batteries from Amazon.

Stimulus Money Reckoning

You think the inflation is bad now, just wait until the bill comes due for all the stimulus money that 65% percent of the population didn't need.

.

gpsaccount wrote:
John from PA wrote:
gpsaccount wrote:

I bought a bunch of rechargeable NiMH batteries from Amazon on sale. I specifically chose, and paid more for, the ones listed as "Made in Japan". 5 boxes of them arrived - all "Made in China".

I talked to Customer Support - first they didn't even recognize the problem, even though their own site was full of reviews saying the Chinese ones were hopeless compared to the Japanese, and secondly they said they couldn't ship me replacement ones listed as "Made in Japan" and guarantee that that was what I would receive. They did offer to cancel the sale and let me keep the Chinese ones, which I did.

Even for free the reviews were right, the Chinese ones are crap - TV remote has to be recharged every two days. In future I'm going to look for Eneloops - and they won't be bought on Amazon.

Batteries are a good example of a fungible good. A laymen's definition of fungible is "Fungible goods are items that are interchangeable because they are identical to each other for practical purposes."

So a bin can have a 100 of brand xyz made in Japan AA batteries and 100 brand xyz made in China and as far as Amazon is concerned they are the same. A robot pulled from stock and as smart as the robot is, it could care less about China or Japan.

This is likely to only happen with relatively low priced items.

I know what they're doing, but they shouldn't advertise them as different products - at different prices - if they're not going to fulfill them that way. As far as I'm concerned it's either lousy business practices or straightforward 'bait and switch'. Either way I'm done with batteries from Amazon.

I had a yen for Japanese rechargeable Eneloops. Bought them from Amazon and they came in tape-sealed boxes. The boxes and batteries say Made in Japan. Hopefully they're not counterfeit. Oh, and they came fully charged.

Gas at the oump

I know, not Amazon, but gas prices have risen a lot.

I agree....

I always check Walmart & Target before pulling the trigger with Amazon.

--
RKF (Bethesda, MD) Garmin Nuvi 660, 360 & Street Pilot

that's the thing

SnookMook wrote:

You think the inflation is bad now, just wait until the bill comes due for all the stimulus money that 65% percent of the population didn't need.

common sense said the extra $600/wk unemployment had ill effects. Why should someone work for $35k when they get $50k unemployed? Not to mention it was unfair. I truly say hats off to people at Walmart, Trader Joes, etc., who went to work Mar 2020 and the rest of the year for that matter.

Even U Chicago who is liberal stated that has a damaging effect on people returning to work.

There's an aspect of society that's gamesmanship. Our parents were so different in mindset, they worked hard without any guarantees.

I did get a Seiko automatic watch for $175. I recognized it as a good price, made in Japan. It went up to $400 the next day, $500 a few days later. Someone who works at amazon knows why, I'm sure.

Inflation in 1981 was a bear, now not so much

In 1981 I was served with divorce papers as my wife wanted to marry another man. I came away from the divorce proceeding with the judge awarding me the home and custody of my two children, age 10 & 12 at the time. I was paying 8.75% interest on my home that I had purchased two-plus years earlier but as part of the settlement, I bought out my ex-wife's 50% equity of my house.

Home interest rates is 1981 were sky high and I took out a 10-year second mortgage at 17.26% interest to pay off both my divorce lawyer and the 50% home equity stake to my ex-wife. My house payment was effectively doubled after my divorce. It was tough sledding for a few years.

Looking at today's interest rates in the range of 3% doesn't seem anywhere near inflationary as back in 1981. Were I paying today's home interest rate in 1981, I would have been ahead by tens of thousands of dollars by comparison.

I got

mcginkleschmidt wrote:

In 1981 I was served with divorce papers as my wife wanted to marry another man. I came away from the divorce proceeding with the judge awarding me the home and custody of my two children, age 10 & 12 at the time. I was paying 8.75% interest on my home that I had purchased two-plus years earlier but as part of the settlement, I bought out my ex-wife's 50% equity of my house.

Home interest rates is 1981 were sky high and I took out a 10-year second mortgage at 17.26% interest to pay off both my divorce lawyer and the 50% home equity stake to my ex-wife. My house payment was effectively doubled after my divorce. It was tough sledding for a few years.

Looking at today's interest rates in the range of 3% doesn't seem anywhere near inflationary as back in 1981. Were I paying today's home interest rate in 1981, I would have been ahead by tens of thousands of dollars by comparison.

credit cards while a junior in college, Citi and AMEX. What made things funny is that as recently as 10 years ago, I was a member of AMEX for longer than its CEO lol

Anyway AMEX was not a revolving credit card, but what was stupid was for me at 20 to pay an annual membership. Citi was a credit card so I maxed it out in a matter of months--$1,200.

I told my mom I don't know what to do the interest is 18%, I'll never be able to pay it off. She said you need to transfer it to a lower interest rate. I said how do I do that? She said look in the newspaper for an offer, and mail it in. hahahahahaha pre-internet

I was able to get it to like 6.9%. But imagine, $1,200 and my world was crashing down.

As a mature adult, I learned the silliness of 0%. I took a 0% card when my son was born in 2013. The plan was to pay the monthly to myself, collect interest, and then pay it off 18 mos later. You guessed it. I found myself with a $14,000 balance and began the 0% balance transfer dance (only now usually there's a 2-3% fee). My wife had a 0% NO FEE offer 2 years ago so we moved it there. Only now am I within striking distance of paying it off. So as old as I am, I understand the fallacy of 0% purchases.

A surprise today was that I noticed my VMW stock was down maybe $30+ since a couple weeks ago. I saw there was a special dividend of $27.40 so now I have some unexpected cash. Nothing I can do about it, wasn't my choice, and taxable. So I'm planning on paying off the 0% debt.