Your GPS dies, do you buy another?

 

I've thought about this recently. I have and maintain 3 Garmins, for myself, spouse, and parents. What would I do if the Garmins start to no longer function?

I rarely use mine as I have found smartphone more efficient. Spouse hasn't moved over yet. Parents will probably not. Since I have 3, I don't plan on buying any replacements if any break, each one will serve as backup down the line. Mine already is essentially a back up for the others.

Curious to how many do others have and would you replace?

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660

I still use my trusty 660 but think if it quit I would just use a smartphone. The wife usually uses her phone and we compare it against the gps and it is a toss up sometimes,

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johnm405 660 & MSS&T

I keep and maintain many,

I keep and maintain many, see my signature line.

As long as Garmin keeps making them if I need one I'll get one. I absolutely prefer a stand alone GPS over a phone. Larger screen is one reason, I don't want a phone the size of a tablet.

So far I haven't been anywhere that the GPS lost it's connection, the phone many times.

I'm not sure about POI's on a smartphone but with my Garmin they are very easy to load.

I've been using Garmins for a long time, I'm used to their interface and hope to continue for years to come.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

depends which one

Nuvi for the car, nope, not a chance. My phone does a good job and I can move the zumo over for when i go in bad cell phone coverage areas. I keep it mainly for if i needed a gps at the same time my wife did and if our phones wouldn't do (super, duper unlikely).

Zumo for the bike, probably would replace. Don't like the phone cradles or chargers for the bike and i take it into bad phone coverage areas. Replacement would have to have bluetooth for phone calls and a mp3 player.

My Sentiments

soberbyker wrote:

I keep and maintain many, see my signature line.

As long as Garmin keeps making them if I need one I'll get one. I absolutely prefer a stand alone GPS over a phone. Larger screen is one reason, I don't want a phone the size of a tablet.

So far I haven't been anywhere that the GPS lost it's connection, the phone many times.

I'm not sure about POI's on a smartphone but with my Garmin they are very easy to load.

I've been using Garmins for a long time, I'm used to their interface and hope to continue for years to come.

.

My sentiments, exactly. I favor single purpose gadgets that do a good job over multipurpose ones that do a mediocre job.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

out of town

I like the gps over the cellphone for out of town use, in town cell works just fine. im more comfortable traveling with a GPS on along distance and I would replace it if it died on me .

2450

I've been contemplating this if my 2450 ever fails. If I ever want to know how long I've had fine, I just have to visit this site to see how long I've been a member since I joined shortly after getting it (7 years, 29 week.) This 2450 is my first and only GPS for a car.

I only use it on long trips and even if I know the way, I like it when going through metro areas as it lets me know how far exits are, lanes to be in, etc. That is the one thing I don't like a smartphone for even if it provides it (though it could do traffic). If I need traffic I may have my smartphone and Garmin going at the same time.

Still if the time ever came where the Garmin would die on me, I'm still undecided if I would get another unit. I guess time will tell.

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Garmin Nuvi 2450

GPS

I for one will not use my smartphone for anything but making calls. I do not have or want to pay for an expensive data plan to be able to use the phone as a GPS. Maybe in the US of A these plans are much cheaper than in Canada.
Additionally twice a year I drive through areas where there is NO or minimal cellphone coverage.
The lack of cellphone coverage does not affect my Garmin!
Another reason is that where I live during the summer handheld devices are forbidden to be used in a vehicle unless fixed in place but it cannot be touched. If found doing this its a $ 1,000.00 fine for the first time. The fine for a second offence is more and a third offence it's $ 5,000.00 and you lose your licence for 30 days. I can just imagine what that may do to your insurance premium!!!

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Nuvi 350 long gone, Nuvi 855LMT, Nuvi 2797LMT, SmartDrive 50 LMT-HD, 3790LMT now my daughters. Using Windows 10. DashCam A108C with GPS.

I only have one, Nuvi 760. I

I only have one, Nuvi 760. I only use it when I'm on vacation. I just used it last December in Grand Canyon South Rim where cellular signal almost does not exist. If it breaks, I'm sure I'll get a replacement.

It depends...

My nuvi is my main device, despite the GPS in my phone and in my car. The nuvi is easy to update -- and it is free. My phone is "self-updating" but only works when I have a data connection. The GPS built into the car will cost something like $200 each time I want to update the maps and doesn't do proximity alerts.

Yes

To answer the OP's Question: "Your GPS dies, do you buy another?"
Yes.
As I just did for one of the Nuvi 50's I maintain. I bought a Drive 51LM which was on a great sale over the holidays.

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I never get lost, but I do explore new territory every now and then.

Yes I would buy another one.

I use it all the time. The only time I use the phone and google maps is when I am going someplace and I know it will be only once.

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Nuvi 2460LMT.

Yer not gonna like this then

phranc wrote:
soberbyker wrote:

I keep and maintain many, see my signature line.

As long as Garmin keeps making them if I need one I'll get one. I absolutely prefer a stand alone GPS over a phone. Larger screen is one reason, I don't want a phone the size of a tablet.

So far I haven't been anywhere that the GPS lost it's connection, the phone many times.

I'm not sure about POI's on a smartphone but with my Garmin they are very easy to load.

I've been using Garmins for a long time, I'm used to their interface and hope to continue for years to come.

.

My sentiments, exactly. I favor single purpose gadgets that do a good job over multipurpose ones that do a mediocre job.

I tried Garmin on an iPhone and loved it. It was almost identical to the Montana, and then some. The connectivity to the cell system added a few extras. I also use a GPSMAP 64s for car nav. Yeah, the screen is small, but I don't mind. It zooms in when needed and that works. The Garmin app on the iPhone was great, such that I used the 64s less and less and migrated to the iPhone. Then Garmin cancels the Garmin iPhone app and it is running as long as there are no big changes to the iOS that obsolete it. The onboard mapping and data eliminates concerns about cell service.

I have since tried Waze on the iPhone and I like it, especially the advance warnings. It's a good navigator too. The navigators on the iPhone have gotten quite good, and I use my GPSMAP mostly for outdoor activities and such. I live in a pretty advanced civilized area with no concerns about losing cell service.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

yes

Would buy referb

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garry

I'd replace

I'd definitely get a new Garmin.

Free map updates, no data plan required, able to load custom POIs.

--
NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

you're right ...

diesel wrote:

I tried Garmin on an iPhone and loved it. It was almost identical to the Montana, and then some. The connectivity to the cell system added a few extras. I also use a GPSMAP 64s for car nav. Yeah, the screen is small, but I don't mind. It zooms in when needed and that works. The Garmin app on the iPhone was great, such that I used the 64s less and less and migrated to the iPhone. Then Garmin cancels the Garmin iPhone app and it is running as long as there are no big changes to the iOS that obsolete it. The onboard mapping and data eliminates concerns about cell service.

I have since tried Waze on the iPhone and I like it, especially the advance warnings. It's a good navigator too. The navigators on the iPhone have gotten quite good, and I use my GPSMAP mostly for outdoor activities and such. I live in a pretty advanced civilized area with no concerns about losing cell service.

I don't like it (them) My old eyes don't see like they used to so my 7 inch DriveSmart 61 is good for me, the Montana and GPSMAP 64 are both a lot smaller, with the 64 tiny by my standards, similar to my old flip phone screen size. I don't use my GPS to hike so no need for a handheld, although Google maps on my Galaxy S6 Android would work in a pinch if I needed one, and I have a Zumo 550 for my motorcycle. Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

I don't want a phone call to come in at the exact moment I am trying to navigate a confusing interchange and take over the screen, if I could see it at all on those devices.

It's great that there is such a variety of these things to suit the different activities people do. But, as I said in my first comment in answer to the OP, yes, I will keep buying GPS's as needed as long as they are available for a reasonable price.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

Uh yes..

Until Cellphones have true gps tech. I won't waste a trip without one.

They do

allbizz wrote:

Until Cellphones have true gps tech. I won't waste a trip without one.

Cell phones have the same GPS chips that dedicated units have. Some higher end phones even have both sets (USA GPS and European GNSS) chipsets.

--
Garmin Nuvi 2450

Been there done that

My Garmins did die a few years ago. I switched to my iPhone with Waze. But I have become increasingly concerned with Google, who operates Waze, or any other smartphone app having too much information about me, and feeling they didn't need my help in locating me down to the square tenth-of-a-mile.

So I've gone back to standalone Garmin GPSs instead. Garmin doesn't know where I am. The traffic data isn't as good with Garmin LMTs as it is on Waze, IMO, but I prefer the additional privacy.

I think the writing is on the wall, that the consumer GPS market is going away, but I'll ride it out for now.

Refurbs and used units on eBay remain good choices for people who agree.

Stand alone GPS devices are going the way of yesteryear's

Stand alone GPS navigation devices are going the way of yesteryear's typewriters, phone booths, rotary dial telephones, pagers, VHS tapes, vinyl records, floppy discs, VCRs, yellow pages, encyclopedias, newspapers, photograph film, phone books, etc.

--
According to the laws of aerodynamics, bumblebees cannot fly. But the bumblebees, not knowing the laws of aerodynamics, go ahead and fly anyway...

Probably

Not sure which one though. I heard something abut lifetime maps only being good for two years on Tom Tom so I guess that brand is out...

Yes, positively

Actually happened last Spring. My 265WT was getting unreliable on a trip and as soon as I got home a new unit was ordered. I later found it was the 265's power cord, so a replacement simply meant the 265WT resides in a different car.

I also use a dumb phone and the wife, who does have a smartphone, is always using it so it would not generally be available for navigation.

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John from PA

i'm on the fence

I take the time to plan my routes and at times travel specific roads. Standalone units offer trip planning computer based software which isn't currently available on in vehicle or smartphones. I'm getting ready to buy my first car with a built-in unit but there is very little information about their GPS and if they will accept custom routes or POI from an external source. If I can't customize the car's unit I will buy another standalone.

--
"In order to be old and wise, one first must have been young and stupid."

no

No, the only thing I use it for is speed/rlc cams when I am in a strange city, and everyone thinks I am kinda silly for doing that.

"When was the last time you actually got a ticket from one?"

NEVER.

But to tell you the truth, without being able to know what the threshold is for speed cams in different places? I like to know what the speed limit is. There are plenty of roads that are 25 mph, that would be suitable for 40 mph, etc.

But we have to be realistic, why pay $100 for something your smartphone already does, and much better?

this

jfossy wrote:
allbizz wrote:

Until Cellphones have true gps tech. I won't waste a trip without one.

Cell phones have the same GPS chips that dedicated units have. Some higher end phones even have both sets (USA GPS and European GNSS) chipsets.

This was funny, at least to me.

I got the iPhone Xs in Nov because it was $249. I didn't need it--but, in order to get that price, I had to move the service to it. Even better, my relatives got Xs for $0, but they moved from ATT to Verizon. The deals were good for 3 days before Thanksgiving, and didn't come back.

I have a perfectly good S8, that actually is a cert refurb as it was replaced under warranty 2X, also, in Nov.

I use the S8 for everything on wifi, because I find the apps to be better on the S8 (not trying to start a debate). What does surprise me, however, is that the S8 has a higher resolution on the OLED than the Xs, and is what, 2 gen older?

I had set the google maps in the house, on the S8, to work, and started navigation. It was on wifi.

As I drove, having not canceled it, I heard instructions coming from my pocket. The S8 was navigating, with no internet connection, no cellular connection.

It must have something downloaded locally, and can act like a gps without wifi or 4G or cell. No different than Garmin.

What do they do

johnnatash4 wrote:

...can act like a gps without wifi or 4G or cell. No different than Garmin.

While a lot of cell phones have a genuine GPS receiver buried inside them, they may have somewhat inferior reception to a good standalone GPS receiver simply for lacking as good an antenna. More importantly the software may not be configured to provide you with mapping and other information when you are out of communication. (it would need to have pre-emptively downloaded adequate maps to cover the communication gap, for one thing)

In other words, some models when out of communication may know perfectly well where you are, but be unable to display properly the roads around you, to provide navigation instructions, etc.

To respond to the original question, I lack a smart phone, so am completely dependent on my Garmin for car navigation, and would definitely use another if this one failed.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Buying Garmin's as Long as They Are Available

I've owned dozens of Garmin GPSr's over the years. I've never had one fail that wasn't easily repairable. I usually sell the units I don't use and keep the ones I like.

I do use a smartphone with various navigation apps but I haven't found any that will totally replicate the features available on the Garmins. I frequently load and reload custom maps and thousands of POI's on both my handheld and automotive units. This process is easily done on a Garmin but tedious if not impossible with a smartphone.

Maybe smartphones & apps will eventually advance to the point where they are useful to me. Until then, I'll continue buy, use and repair my Garmins.

your story

bdhsfz6 wrote:

I've owned dozens of Garmin GPSr's over the years. I've never had one fail that wasn't easily repairable. I usually sell the units I don't use and keep the ones I like.

I do use a smartphone with various navigation apps but I haven't found any that will totally replicate the features available on the Garmins. I frequently load and reload custom maps and thousands of POI's on both my handheld and automotive units. This process is easily done on a Garmin but tedious if not impossible with a smartphone.

Maybe smartphones & apps will eventually advance to the point where they are useful to me. Until then, I'll continue buy, use and repair my Garmins.

Maybe it's sort of a hobby and plain and simply what you like.

I am that way with a manual transmission. They are pretty much extinct. Even new trucks are automatics. The 2019 BMW 3 series, does not have a manual transmission available. Imagine that? 2019 Toyota Corolla has an imanual available, but try to locate one from DC to Boston?

So people can say hey, you don't like a 3rd pedal in your car and you don't like to shift, you like our new 10-speed auto much better, trust us. But I don't, I rent enough cars for work to know!

Replace?

I probably would not replace a gps. That is mostly because I don't travel as much. I liked using a gps to plan trips, but I don't expect to need that like I used to.

Good Point

soberbyker wrote:
diesel wrote:

I tried Garmin on an iPhone and loved it. It was almost identical to the Montana, and then some. The connectivity to the cell system added a few extras. I also use a GPSMAP 64s for car nav. Yeah, the screen is small, but I don't mind. It zooms in when needed and that works. The Garmin app on the iPhone was great, such that I used the 64s less and less and migrated to the iPhone. Then Garmin cancels the Garmin iPhone app and it is running as long as there are no big changes to the iOS that obsolete it. The onboard mapping and data eliminates concerns about cell service.

I have since tried Waze on the iPhone and I like it, especially the advance warnings. It's a good navigator too. The navigators on the iPhone have gotten quite good, and I use my GPSMAP mostly for outdoor activities and such. I live in a pretty advanced civilized area with no concerns about losing cell service.

I don't like it (them) My old eyes don't see like they used to so my 7 inch DriveSmart 61 is good for me, the Montana and GPSMAP 64 are both a lot smaller, with the 64 tiny by my standards, similar to my old flip phone screen size. I don't use my GPS to hike so no need for a handheld, although Google maps on my Galaxy S6 Android would work in a pinch if I needed one, and I have a Zumo 550 for my motorcycle. Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

I don't want a phone call to come in at the exact moment I am trying to navigate a confusing interchange and take over the screen, if I could see it at all on those devices.

It's great that there is such a variety of these things to suit the different activities people do. But, as I said in my first comment in answer to the OP, yes, I will keep buying GPS's as needed as long as they are available for a reasonable price.

But if you need/like the big screen size that only a GPSr offers, then you HAVE TO keep replacing that GPSr. They are the only thing with screens that big. Needing a specific feature such as a large screen is a very different criteria than the navigation feature sets. Besides, smartphones just aren't that big... yet. You need a big screen, so that eliminates many options for you, or leaves you with very few options. Maybe you should look into an iPad mini and see if that can work for you somehow.

I LOVE my Garmins, but the iPhone with the right app is just as good. My wife was stunned to see me migrate from the Garmins to the iPhone for car nav. Now if Garmin would just change their mind and continue the iPhone app, all would be good. I'll still have a GPSMAP 64s, and maybe a GPSMAP 66s in the near future, for the outdoor activities, and as an iPhone backup in the car.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

i have ...

I was hundreds of miles from home, in unfamiliar territory, when my nuvi-2555 gave up. I soon found myself at the nearest Walmart, purchasing a new DriveSmart.

--

it's the dog's fault

--
Garmin nuvi 2455 - nuvi 350, 260 (spares) - my other toys: Mac Mini, MacBook Pro, MacOS: Mojave 10.14 and introducing The Beast, a 2013 Dodge Charger Pursuit and his Garmin DriveSmart 5. The dog's name is Ginger

.

.

--
Garmin nuvi 2455 - nuvi 350, 260 (spares) - my other toys: Mac Mini, MacBook Pro, MacOS: Mojave 10.14 and introducing The Beast, a 2013 Dodge Charger Pursuit and his Garmin DriveSmart 5. The dog's name is Ginger

 

I would. I find satellite navigation to be very useful when driving.

in a heartbeat just look in

in a heartbeat just look in my signature

What'd you say?

renegade734 wrote:

.
-
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--

What'd you say?

--
According to the laws of aerodynamics, bumblebees cannot fly. But the bumblebees, not knowing the laws of aerodynamics, go ahead and fly anyway...

I like having GPS separate

I like having GPS separate from my smartphone so my phone is free for an app, kids to play with it, make calls without having to leave navigation screen, etc.

Yes I would

Waze is great, but I talk on my phone when I drive so I like having a separate GPS.

actually ...

diesel wrote:

But if you need/like the big screen size that only a GPSr offers, then you HAVE TO keep replacing that GPSr. They are the only thing with screens that big. Needing a specific feature such as a large screen is a very different criteria than the navigation feature sets. Besides, smartphones just aren't that big... yet.

~snip~

There are several tablets that can also be used as a phone so the phone/map combo is possible. Still I prefer the Garmin, I don't want a phone that needs a suitcase to carry. My Samsung Galaxy S6 is at just about the size limit for me, it still fits in a t-shirt pocket.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

I use Android for Andriod things and GPS for GPS

First I have a flip up tray for Garmin in my Frontier, but I prefer saving Android battery and data time (TracPhone) for Android needs

It's A Matter of Trust

soberbyker wrote:

Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

What don't you trust about Waze? Before I get too attached to it. I gotta say, I like the warnings such as hazards of all sorts.

--
GPSMAP64s, iPhone XR w/Garmin North America, Yaesu VX-8R w/GPS.

Not Accurate

scott_dog wrote:

Not sure which one though. I heard something abut lifetime maps only being good for two years on Tom Tom so I guess that brand is out...

The "lifetime map" is defined by TomTom as for the useful life of the device. The maps are growing dramatically as they add more information, and some of the older devices no longer have sufficient memory to store the new maps, but the "useful life" is much more than two years.

As an example, the TomTom that I bought 10 years ago was just classified as "end-of-life". It's still working fine, but lacks sufficient internal memory for future maps. The newer models can operate off either internal or external memory, have a lot more internal memory, and also accept micro-SD chips up to 32 GB, so two years is very far from an accurate value, from what I see.

- Tom -

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XXL540, GO LIVE 1535, GO 620

I tried it and didn't like it either.

The alerts I got for Police or accidents were never where they were supposed to be though it was within a minute of posting. Pretty much every one was a false alert. I guess its time to check it again though since its been about 9 months ago.

diesel wrote:
soberbyker wrote:

Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

What don't you trust about Waze? Before I get too attached to it. I gotta say, I like the warnings such as hazards of all sorts.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

User Input

pwohlrab wrote:

The alerts I got for Police or accidents were never where they were supposed to be though it was within a minute of posting. Pretty much every one was a false alert. I guess its time to check it again though since its been about 9 months ago.

diesel wrote:
soberbyker wrote:

Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

What don't you trust about Waze? Before I get too attached to it. I gotta say, I like the warnings such as hazards of all sorts.

It took a major software update to correct that problem. Users would tap the icon to report the incident, but in the ensuing few minutes it took to complete the report, several miles may have been covered and when the report was sent, it was from the wrong location.

That has been fixed, in that the report location is frozen and when sent, will be placed in the correct place. However, there is no cure for the report that the user fails to send in a timely manner, and may have been sent 10, 15, or even 20 minutes later. You may have arrived at the incident before the report was sent.

I've been using Waze since it's introduction. In the last couple of years, notibly after Google bought them, the reports have been spot on and very timely.

Police move. They may have been reported at the end of their stop and moved on. Same with accidents. I found that Waze only pops up the alert when it's within the view of the current screen coverage. Same for accidents. It may have been cleared by the time you get there. Waze only gives you alerts 4 or 5 miles ahead, at best.

You can help the accuracy of the reports by selecting the Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down icon on the screen when a report pops up. Waze has no way of knowing when something is no longer there without user input.

Remember, only when Waze detects a number of vehicles going slower than the normal traffic speeds does it report a slowdown. Everything else is user input. Waze receives very little input from road sensors and other sources that Google and Here use.

--
Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Yep,

I would buy another one in a heartbeat. Mainly, because they provide better coverage than any other means of navigation. Whether it be smartphones, or, in-car navigation systems. Phones have their limitations because of non-coverage areas and in-car systems have their issues in the cost of updates and failure to provide the map details that only a stand-alone navigation system provides. Traffic details are also lacking in the in-car units. I have XM traffic in my vehicle and once I get away from the city, traffic has a tendency to not be available. However, with my 3597, I have traffic pretty much everywhere. For instance, I drove to Ft. Riley, Kansas, the day before yesterday. Smartlink was notifying me about issues 50-60 miles ahead. That would not have happened with my in-car unit. Also, my grandson (who was with me), kept losing cell coverage out in the middle of Illinois on I-70. He had several instances where he was talking to his mom and his phone would drop the call because of lack of coverage. The Garmin never had that problem.

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

.

diesel wrote:
soberbyker wrote:

Don't like the interface or trust Waze, so I'll stick with a stand alone GPS in my car/work truck.

What don't you trust about Waze? Before I get too attached to it. I gotta say, I like the warnings such as hazards of all sorts.

phranc addressed a lot of what my response was about, he says they fixed some of the problems.

The biggest thing for me is the whole thing depends on user contributions, who's to keep someone from adding stuff that doesn't exist, how about police themselves reporting a speed trap is no longer there, but it is. Admittedly, most of my distrust is from stuff I read, hearsay. I tried it, but not for very long.

Tin foil hat time ... phranc wrote "when Waze detects a number of vehicles going slower than the normal traffic speeds does it report a slowdown."

I know in this day and age we no longer have privacy, cameras everywhere, apps like waze tracking movement, etc. It's kind of scary, even your car can tell your insurance company how you drive, I'm sure your premiums are adjusted accordingly.

I'll keep my GPS and CB radio and have one less bit of technology tracking and reporting my every move.

.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

smart phones

I guess if you never get out into the wilds and only stay in citys and drive on main roads then a cell phone would work for gps. but I like to get away from the main roads and out of the cities so I need a stand alone gps or back to the old ways a truckers map and compass on the dash.

Yes, Absolutely. But last

Yes, Absolutely. But last time my Nuvicam'a battery died within three years. So I ended up buying new DriveSmart 61 but later on ordered new battery and replaced it. Now Nuvicam works well again.

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Iphone 7, Drivesmart 61 - LMTS, Nuvicam, Nuvi 3597LMTHD,765T,1490LMT

Yes I would and did buy another Garmin

My main GPS has been and still is the Nuvi 3597 GPS; it still works but wanted to have another backup Garmin GPS and also needed the backup camera function for one of my older vehicles.

I just recently bought the Drive Assist 51 LMT and the BC30 camera. The 51 LMT also has the built in Dash Cam, another feature I wanted.

Quite pleased with the newer unit.. I do wish it had the same higher resolution display as the 3597 and a magnetic connector mount aka the the 3597 so I don't have to plug/unplug the USB cable.

Smartphone mapping can do in a pinch, but get out in the boonies where no cell support, you are SOL unless you downloaded the maps for offline use.

Also I customize my routes very specificly, especially on long blue highway trips. Just getting there is not the whole deal, the routes are chosen with a lot of planning for scenic areas and avoiding heavy traffic areas if possbile.

Would Buy Another For Sure

I would definitely buy another unit. Between ease of convenience with the loaded POI files from this site and the driving I sometimes do in less than great coverage areas; I wouldn't think twice about it.

My latest Garmin is the 2598

My latest Garmin is the 2598 which I had the battery replaced 3 years ago. In the past two weeks it’s not holding a charge and dying. I’m going to keep it going by ordering a new battery. In the meantime I’ll use my iPhone as a substitute. The volume on the phone is not loud enough which is why I prefer the Garmin.

I still have the 760 but

I still have the 760 but haven't used it in an age. Android Auto and/or Apple Carplay on a 7" screen have been more than enough recently. Being able to just get in the car and say "Take me to X restaurant/store/address etc." is something the 760 can't compete with.

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