LED vs CCFL Backlit LCD TV

 

I got a 32" LG LCD TV (CCFL backlit, I think) that I bought in 2009. It broke in February 2016. That TV released measurable heat when it was on. I could feel it when I was close enough to the top or front of it. I dare not turn it on when Southern California summer heat is at its peak because my bedroom will be a lot warmer with the TV on.

Recently I just bought a 40" Samsung LED backlit TV. Strangely, this larger TV releases less heat than my old 32" LG. Does LED backlit LCD TV run cooler than CCFL or is it because of something else?

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Yes, but

In general LED light sources are more power-effient than fluorescent light sources. So that is one factor.

Possibly you may not have set the new one to the same actual brightness level as the old.

There continue to be new design tricks to get the power consumption down, which may give your new one advantage separate from light source efficiency.

Of course the bigger size of your new one hurts--the other factors must outweigh this in your case.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

Watts

archae86 wrote:

In general LED light sources are more power-effient than fluorescent light sources. So that is one factor.

Possibly you may not have set the new one to the same actual brightness level as the old.

There continue to be new design tricks to get the power consumption down, which may give your new one advantage separate from light source efficiency.

Of course the bigger size of your new one hurts--the other factors must outweigh this in your case.

it'd be interesting to hear the stated watts of each TV. I had a 40" CFL and a 50" LED and find both get warm. I never tried to compare the warmth of one to the other.

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archae86 wrote:

Possibly you may not have set the new one to the same actual brightness level as the old.

I set brightness level to auto. They auto detect ambient light and set the backlight brightness accordingly. The light source has not changed at all. I'm still using the same light bulb. To be honest the new Samsung TV looks brighter than my old 32" LG.

archae86 wrote:

Of course the bigger size of your new one hurts--the other factors must outweigh this in your case.

Sorry, I don't understand these statements.

The new and bigger TV should be warmer than the smaller (broken) one but that's not the case. The new one runs cooler.

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CraigW wrote:

it'd be interesting to hear the stated watts of each TV.

My broken 32" LG LCD TV doesn't show power consumption in the specs sheet.

32" LCD TV (model 32LG70)
Power Consumption (Typical) n/a
Stand-by Consumption >1W

40" LCD TV (model UN40J5200)
Typical Power Consumption 50W
Maximum Power Consumption 85W
Standby Power Consumption Under 0.3W

LEDs draw less current than

LEDs draw less current than does LCD's... Plasma's were the worst heat generators of all... Even a CRT

--
2689LMT That we love... and a Nuvi 660 with Lifetime Maps that we have had literally forever.... And a 2011 Ford Escape with Nav System that is totally ignored!

Fluorescent Lights

Fluorescent lights get so hot (Screw-in type) that you can't hold on to them to remove them after they have been on for a while.

The bulbs get hot and the ballast (transformer) generates a lot of heat as well.

Power consumption per Lumen is far greater for CCFL, hence all the heat.

--
Metricman Nuvi 660, GTM-20 Traffic Receiver Nuvi 3597 GTM-60 Traffic Receiver Williamsburg, VA

The great picture on my

The great picture on my Viera plasma keeps me warm in the winter.

In a general sense LED

In a general sense LED lights hardly create heat at all. I live in the northeast and a lot of our traffic lights were switched to LED and when it snows the lights don't create enough heat to melt the snow that can cover them. Folks who bought LED headlights for their cars have found out the same thing, the headlights get covered by snow with no melting. The LED headlight companies are now making a version that contain a heater just for that reason, jacking the price up of course.

I've switched my home to almost all LED lighting, they use a lot less energy for the same amount of light the old incandescent bulbs used, are cool to the touch, and the life expectancy of most is 10 years or more.

Here's an interesting chart on the savings LED TV's vs others provide: http://energyusecalculator.com/electricity_lcdleddisplay.htm

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. Nuvi 2689, two Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N, Garmin, built into my Jeep. .

Led tv

We do not notice any heat from our 70 inch led tv.
We have switched all bulbs to led except the one that keeps the dog warm in her house. We need so stock up on the old bulbs to be sure and have them for when they quite selling them. Can't let the dog get cold.

--
Mary, Nuvi 2450, Garmin Viago, Honda Navigation, Nuvi 750 (gave to son)

Watts For My LED TV's

CraigW wrote:

it'd be interesting to hear the stated watts of each TV. I had a 40" CFL and a 50" LED and find both get warm. I never tried to compare the warmth of one to the other.

muell9k wrote - I have 3 LED TV's
1) Sony 40" 1080P LED Model# KDL-640K AT 97 Watts
2) Panasonic 42" 1080P LED Model # TCL-42E50 At 92 Watts
3) Sony 49" 4K LED Model # Sony XBR49X800D at 114 Watts

I bought the Sony on Cyber Monday from Amazon and was surprised
it came with a charger that is similar to chargers that come with Laptops. The 49" 4K Sony has a 19.2V DC brick charger that plugs into the TV using a round connector. I've never owned a TV that uses this type of charger, I only had power supply's that use standard 110V plugs. More crap to clutter up the TV stand.

I really never compared how much heat there different models put out.

--
Nuvi 660 2460LMT Sold My 765T

LED > CCFL

chewbacca wrote:

I set brightness level to auto. They auto detect ambient light and set the backlight brightness accordingly. The light source has not changed at all. I'm still using the same light bulb. To be honest the new Samsung TV looks brighter than my old 32" LG.

CCFL yellows and dims as it ages before eventually burning out. LED light is constant throughout its lifetime. Your new TV actually is brighter than the old one despite the settings being identical. Your eyes however had become so accustomed to the dimming and yellowing of the CCFL that you never noticed it.

As an example of CCFL dimming and yellowing, my old HP laptop from 2005 uses a CCFL backlight, and compared to my Dell Inspiron 15 from 2010 or my XPS 18 from 2013 is both dimmer and yellower. I don't know how much longer the CCFL will last, but when the laptop finally does die, I'll ask someone to put it out of its misery with a shotgun blast.

chewbacca wrote:

The new and bigger TV should be warmer than the smaller (broken) one but that's not the case. The new one runs cooler.

LEDs are longer lasting, draw less energy, and more reliable than CCFL, which is why liquid crystal displays in laptops and televisions now use them. The switch from CCFL to LED should translate into the display generating less waste heat as LEDs are very power efficient for their size.

For the sake of completeness, I need to mention that plasma screens, while bulkier than their LCD counterparts had more accurate color representation, as their blacks register as black rather than a dark gray as on a LCD television. While LCDs use software tricks to get close to true black, the only modern technology that can generate a true black is an AMOLED display, where each individual pixel generates its own light, thus eliminating need of a backlight. Such displays though are hideously expensive.

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"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

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JanJ wrote:

LEDs draw less current than does LCD's...

Apples and oranges comparison there. They are both LCDs. The difference is the backlight, LED and CCFL (or CFL, not sure which term is correct).

Fluorescent

chewbacca wrote:

The difference is the backlight, LED and CCFL (or CFL, not sure which term is correct).

Most references call the ones used for display backlighting CCFL. I prefer just to use the parent term fluorescent, as that is the technology that largely determines the luminous efficiency of interest here.

--
personal GPS user since 1992

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soberbyker wrote:

In a general sense LED lights hardly create heat at all. I live in the northeast and a lot of our traffic lights were switched to LED and when it snows the lights don't create enough heat to melt the snow that can cover them. Folks who bought LED headlights for their cars have found out the same thing, the headlights get covered by snow with no melting. The LED headlight companies are now making a version that contain a heater just for that reason, jacking the price up of course.

Interesting. That reminds me of watching the news about LED powered traffic lights covered by snow.

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

CCFL yellows and dims as it ages before eventually burning out. LED light is constant throughout its lifetime. Your new TV actually is brighter than the old one despite the settings being identical. Your eyes however had become so accustomed to the dimming and yellowing of the CCFL that you never noticed it.

LEDs are longer lasting, draw less energy, and more reliable than CCFL, which is why liquid crystal displays in laptops and televisions now use them. The switch from CCFL to LED should translate into the display generating less waste heat as LEDs are very power efficient for their size.

Yeah, I never really noticed the yellowing.

I guess I'm not imagining things. I was worried that a larger TV would make my bedroom more uncomfortable during summer nights. Unfortunately now my TV won't help warm up the room a little during Southern CA mild winter evenings. Believe it or not, my broken 32" TV with CCFL backlight did add some heat to my room in winter. A welcome side effect but only in winter.

Plasma

JanJ wrote:

LEDs draw less current than does LCD's... Plasma's were the worst heat generators of all... Even a CRT

I have a 55" plasma TV. At the time I bought it that was pretty much the biggest TV on the market. It puts out quite a lot of heat but the picture is superb. smile

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