Roundabout opinion

 

I'm starting to see many new roundabouts around the US Southeast. I just read many older drivers don't like them. I'm 63, and am a fan.

It seems to me "Yield to traffic in circle" is much less confusing that the usual 4 way stop quandry of I think I was here first.

So, I'm curious: What's your opinion?

Like? Dislike? Why?

Roy Adams
Atlanta and Tampa

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Better than popcorn

Like them very much. Better than stop signs and traffic lights

wrong way

Near by my Home hey are 2 road that the GPS does not know.1 is a dead end road that according to my gps should be accessible and the other is on the exspresway turn around please note that I had the same problem with the 2010 maps and still have the same problem problem with the 2011.10 version. who should I call and notify about solving this problem ones and for all ?

Also can someone please provvide me with the phone number to call?

Here you go

Driver 38 wrote:

Near by my Home hey are 2 road that the GPS does not know.1 is a dead end road that according to my gps should be accessible and the other is on the exspresway turn around please note that I had the same problem with the 2010 maps and still have the same problem problem with the 2011.10 version. who should I call and notify about solving this problem ones and for all ?

Also can someone please provvide me with the phone number to call?

Not quite a "roundabout opinion" but here's how to report a map error:

https://my.garmin.com/mapErrors/report.faces

not always .....

BobDee wrote:

~snip~

Again: CARS IN THE ROUNDABOUT HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY, not the cars entering, Yield to the cars already in the roundabout or traffic circle!

The city of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) had one where the yield signs were for cars already in the circle, which was really confusing because it's like you say in nearby New Jersey, yield to enter the circle.

Just recently they switched it to yield to enter.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .

For NASCAR fans

soberbyker wrote:

The city of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) had one where the yield signs were for cars already in the circle,

You have to stay in forever. shock

yielding to exit, would be counterproductive to roundabouts

soberbyker wrote:
BobDee wrote:

~snip~

Again: CARS IN THE ROUNDABOUT HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY, not the cars entering, Yield to the cars already in the roundabout or traffic circle!

The city of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) had one where the yield signs were for cars already in the circle, which was really confusing because it's like you say in nearby New Jersey, yield to enter the circle.

Just recently they switched it to yield to enter.

It's good to see Philly has logic in it's traffic and law departments. Otherwise they would have had to post a tow truck at the roundabout full time.

yielding to exit is counterproductive to roundabouts

--
Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

Not good for big trucks

Roundabouts don't seem to be too good for 18-wheelers. Most of the ones I've seen are too narrow for the turns, and you end up running your trailer tires over the curbs.

There's one on a major highway over in eastern Kansas, though -- the speed limit is 65 MPH, and then you come to this roundabout! Narrow lanes & all, on the brakes to get slowed down for it, and once you're past the darned thing, you accelerate back up to 65 MPH. I don't care for it, seems to me roundabouts are better suited to slower speeds.

--
KD5XB in DM84

Roundabout Fan

I live in the region of Waterloo about 50 miles west of Toronto, Ontario. The Region has a population of about 600,000 with three major cities as part of the Region.

To date the Region has installed 19 roundabouts, including a number of multi-lane roundabouts. The individual cities have also included a number and I can only guess that there about 10-15 more that the three cities have installed, but these are usually smaller.

We have one major roundabout, in the town of St. Jacob's Ontario that is a very busy intersection, with significant car and truck traffic. It also has a fairly significant number of Mennonite Horse and Buggy Traffic and I do not believe there have been any deaths at this intersection. Prior to the Roundabout, this was a very dangerous intersection with traffic lights.

If you want a comprehensive education on them, go to the Region's site at http://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/gettingaround/roundabouts....

This has education videos and other education material.

In general, they have proven that they reduce the number of accidents, to a certain degree, but the big factor has been the magnitude of these accidents. Since you are automatically forced to go in on an angle, there are no high speed T-Bone accidents. There have been no pedestrian deaths and the pedestrian injury rate is reduced significantly.

The key is to slow down, when entering and yielding to vehicles that are already in the roundabout.

If you are basically going straight through, you signal right only when you're about to exit the roundabout. If you're making the equivalent of a left turn, signal left when entering and then signal right when you're about to exit the roundabout. For right turns, simply signal right.

It is simply wrong to have cars yield to cars entering the roundabout. It should always be yield to the car already in the roundabout.

Also, come to a stop for pedestrians that show their intention to cross the roundabout.

the biggest problems with roundabouts are the inconsiderate dumbasses that don't slow down or yield. we all know them. They're the same dumbasses that run red lights and are always in a huge rush, to the safety detriment of everyone else.

There is another study, that goes through all of the pros and cons of Waterloo's Roundabout experience. If you really want to understand go to http://www.teachamerica.com/RAB08/RAB08_Papers/RAB08S4BWeber...

The key thing is they are safer, they save gas, they do speed up traffic flow, but show a little courtesy.

--
NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Would you prefer traffic lights?

KD5XB wrote:

Roundabouts don't seem to be too good for 18-wheelers. Most of the ones I've seen are too narrow for the turns, and you end up running your trailer tires over the curbs.

There's one on a major highway over in eastern Kansas, though -- the speed limit is 65 MPH, and then you come to this roundabout! Narrow lanes & all, on the brakes to get slowed down for it, and once you're past the darned thing, you accelerate back up to 65 MPH. I don't care for it, seems to me roundabouts are better suited to slower speeds.

I tend to feel that 65 MPH is too fast for any intersection, whether it has traffic lights, stop signs, or a roundabout.

However, a trucker going 65 MPH is going to have to hit the brakes and come to a complete stop at lights or stop signs. At a roundabout, you usually only have to slow down. Much easier and fuel efficient than a complete stop.

There are many instances where cars and trucks will speed up when the see the light start to change, which often results in a deadly T-Bone accident and the car always loses.

Waterloo Region's roundabouts all have curbs that allow the trucks to roll over. It again boils down to common sense on the part of cars.

We have numerous roundabouts in Waterloo Region that have a significant 18 wheeler usage and they work fine.

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NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Double Circle

The Tofu smoking-Berkenstock wearing idiots who got C's&D's in engineering school now work for the state highway departments and are responsible for these things. they are unable to draw a straight line so they come up with these.
We have in one community a double circle. Circle around then enter another circle to go around. I sit in the window of a coffee shop just to watch the mayhem ensue at this intersection. It like square dancing with cars!

Right On

Bflotom2 wrote:

The Tofu smoking-Berkenstock wearing idiots who got C's&D's in engineering school now work for the state highway departments and are responsible for these things. they are unable to draw a straight line so they come up with these.

Who else would hire them?

C's & D's

Bflotom2 wrote:

The Tofu smoking-Berkenstock wearing idiots who got C's&D's in engineering school now work for the state highway departments and are responsible for these things. they are unable to draw a straight line so they come up with these.

Given that they work admirably all over the rest of the world maybe you should be more focused on the idiots who got C's and D's in driving school?

Here, Here

gpsaccount wrote:

..

Given that they work admirably all over the rest of the world maybe you should be more focused on the idiots who got C's and D's in driving school?

Here, Here.

I've admired the simple, elegant, functionality of traffic circles for 20 years since experiencing them in England.

The fact that they work best when drivers are somewhat courteous and pay attention to driving though, was becoming obvious even there as the years went by and city populations became more self-obsessed. Nearly all of the circles near London and Birmingham have had to have traffic signals installed to force civilized entry and reduce circle congestion.

Washington D.C. has had traffic circles ever since L'Enfant designed the roads there in 1792. My entire adult memory though is that they have always had traffic lights. (Makes sense to me now that I realize D.C. is the historical home of self-obsession).

The circles in D.C. and the ones here in the MD suburbs (mostly without lights), have always worked very well.

--
It's about the Line- If a line can be drawn between the powers granted and the rights retained, it would seem to be the same thing, whether the latter be secured by declaring that they shall not be abridged, or that the former shall not be extended.

good

roundabout is good. just need to remember you are not driving at UK, where you will do clockwise turn.

New

They're sort of new here in Indiana...the locals don't like them. I've lived here since 1990 and I like them personally, IF I'm not behind a person that comes to a complete stop, which defeats the whole purpose of it.

I got used to them in the 70's when going to college in Boston, Massachusetts. We called them rotaries there and not roundabouts.

saw that in other places, 2

soberbyker wrote:
BobDee wrote:

~snip~

Again: CARS IN THE ROUNDABOUT HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY, not the cars entering, Yield to the cars already in the roundabout or traffic circle!

The city of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) had one where the yield signs were for cars already in the circle, which was really confusing because it's like you say in nearby New Jersey, yield to enter the circle.

Just recently they switched it to yield to enter.

Saw that in other places, too. Just follow the posted sign and slow down, that is best COA.

I love roundabouts. Much

I love roundabouts. Much better than intersections.

Roundabout Opinion

I am 65 years old and I don't think they are safe.

--
Alan-Garmin c340

I am okay with them ...

There are lots of roundabout intersections already constructed or under consideration in southeast Michigan. A lot of people hate them. They take some getting used to. Once people get the hang of them, they seem to work out well.

--

it's the dog's fault

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Davenport IA Roundabout

Got one of these in Davenport IA. It's out in the middle of nowhere. Why of all places did they decide that was a good spot I'll never know.

They are fine if....

....they are designed right. Sometimes the engineers that design these things don't take into consideration the amount of land that it takes for these things to function the way they should. I have seen them in the NE (Mass., NH, Vermont,) and they work quite well. But they have installed a couple here in SW Ohio and the engineer's office cut corners and they don't function near as well as they do in the Northeast. (By the way, they were called Rotaries in New England when I was stationed up there in the Army 40 years ago.)

--
It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible. ----George Washington

extremely dislike

Here in the Gulf South
turn indicator means please floor it and close that gap.
2 car separation means there is space for 3 cars to jump in front of you.
yield means go to the pinch point and stop
It is an insult for someone to pass or get in front of you.
traffic circle is a bumper car alley

I find they're better than

I find they're better than four-way stops in a lightly traveled intersection, but it's horrible for a busy intersection that warrants a traffic light.

We've had a few of them pop up in my neighborhood, and people can't seem to remember what the rules are. Never mind the "yield" signs at the entrance.

Having lived in Mexico where those were plentiful, it seems Americans (for the most part) have little idea how to navigate through them.

That may change at some point.

--
nüvi 750 & 760

Terminology

maddog67 wrote:

(By the way, they were called Rotaries in New England when I was stationed up there in the Army 40 years ago.)

I don't want to belabour the point, but as mentioned earlier in this thread: the term "roundabout" now refers to a rather specific type of circular intersection. People may have had unpleasant experiences with "traffic circles", "rotaries", etc. in the past, but those experiences may not be relevant to a discussion of (modern) roundabouts.

How about this one?

Most Confusing Roundabout in the World, Magic Roundabout – Swindon, UK

The Magic Roundabout in Swindon, England was constructed in 1972 and consists of five mini-roundabouts arranged in a circle. In 2009 it was voted the fourth scariest junction in Britain, in a poll by Britannia Rescue. To be fair, once understood this intersection is amazingly functional and actually designed to reduce overall congestion. However, it is certainly an urban wonder and highly perplexing to the uninitiated.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g129/DuraNut/Roundabout.jp...

--
GPSmap76Cx handheld, Nuvi 2557LMT, Nuvfi 2598LMTHD

Uninitiated

HerbSch wrote:

Most Confusing Roundabout in the World, Magic Roundabout – Swindon, UK

The Magic Roundabout in Swindon, England was constructed in 1972 and consists of five mini-roundabouts arranged in a circle. In 2009 it was voted the fourth scariest junction in Britain, in a poll by Britannia Rescue. To be fair, once understood this intersection is amazingly functional and actually designed to reduce overall congestion. However, it is certainly an urban wonder and highly perplexing to the uninitiated.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g129/DuraNut/Roundabout.jpg

Consider me uninitiated. Any road you have to study to figure out which way to go before driving on is unacceptable, to me. I wonder how many horns are blown everyday at people going the wrong way.

Edit - Simple roundabouts seem to work fine. The Magic roundabout may be fine for the regular users but I'm would guess that first timers haven't a clue if they are going the right way.

--
Harley BOOM GTS, Zumo 665, (2) Nuvi 765Ts, 1450LMT, 1350LM & others | 2019 Harley Ultra Limited Shrine - Peace Officer Dark Blue

Circle option

roywadams wrote:

I'm starting to see many new roundabouts around the US Southeast. I just read many older drivers don't like them. I'm 63, and am a fan.

It seems to me "Yield to traffic in circle" is much less confusing that the usual 4 way stop quandry of I think I was here first.

So, I'm curious: What's your opinion?

Like? Dislike? Why?

Roy Adams
Atlanta and Tampa

I have seen a few in my area in NJ. They seem to flow pretty nice. No problem thus far.

--
Garmin Nuvi 260W Garmin Nuvi 1490T If you think knowledge is expensive, try ignorance.

Roundabouts

I wish we could replace almost every red light or stop sign with them. Some municipalities claim that it interfere with emergency vehicles.

Roundabouts Great for Busy Intersections.

spider_elliott wrote:

I find they're better than four-way stops in a lightly traveled intersection, but it's horrible for a busy intersection that warrants a traffic light.

In Waterloo Region, Ontario, they are actually replacing some busy traffic light intersections with roundabouts. Franklin Ave. Cambridge, Ontario is very busy and many T Bones and other accidents at the lights. The Region is planning to replace about ten of these lighted intersections with Roundabouts, to reduce accidents.

Maybe that's why some places are looking at a Red Light Camera that predicts when someone is going to do a runner and stops the Green Light for the other direction from activating.

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/35546

--
NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Been through several

in the Semi when I drove truck. I like em as a motorist, but as a truck driver very few are designed for trucks.

The one exception I drove through daily is in Angola Indiana on US-20. Plenty of room to get a Semi through.

not just confusing...

HerbSch wrote:

Most Confusing Roundabout in the World, Magic Roundabout – Swindon, UK

The Magic Roundabout in Swindon, England was constructed in 1972 and consists of five mini-roundabouts arranged in a circle. In 2009 it was voted the fourth scariest junction in Britain, in a poll by Britannia Rescue. To be fair, once understood this intersection is amazingly functional and actually designed to reduce overall congestion. However, it is certainly an urban wonder and highly perplexing to the uninitiated.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g129/DuraNut/Roundabout.jp...

not just confusing.. (as you can see, it is counter-clockwise in center circle while clockwise turn in satellite circles) but, if there are two or three trucks stop before a stopline, it could cause deadlock situation.
In addition, with so many circles put together, it is hard to decide who has right-of-way, when someone is going out of a circle and about to go into another circle.

However, it was very creative, really interesting!!

They are starting to show up

They are starting to show up here in Illinois and Iowa. First time I had the opportunity to use one I was along for the ride while the Mrs. was driving, she got confused, and I felt like Clark Griswold going around in circles until she finally veered to the right and exited after 2 trips around.

Roundabout opinion

We have a couple in Round Rock, Tx. There was one in our neighborhood, but they built it to big. Big trucks and firetrucks kept putting tire ruts in them. So they put smaller ones and it worked great. Planners didn't think about that at the time.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

I dont mind roudabouts but I

I dont mind roudabouts but I do find them annoying when your not expecting them. I still remember the time I was heading back to Rolla late one night after spending the weekend at home doing laundry and much to my surprise they had put in a roundabout that weekend and sure enough I went up and over it as that intersection never had one before and it was the dead of night with no street light and they had not installed the signs yet.

Roundabout Opinion

Puget Sound area, WA.
Traffic engineers seem to be going crazy with 'em around here. In general I think their a good idea. There are a few as in intersection of highway 9 and SR 538 that are way too small where the designing engineer should be arrested.

roundabouts

https://www.google.com.au/maps/@-37.8774008,144.780409,16.75...
everywhere
started in the 60s
huge reduction in accidents
on everything from 1 lane roads, to 8 lane hwy
just have to teach the idiot level operator to yield

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If only ..

ROUNDABOUT

I JUST HATE THOSE ROUNDABOUT AS MANY PEOPLE DO NOT KNOW THAT THEY SHOULD YIELD TO THE TRAFFIC COMING FROM THE CIRCLE

DISLIKE

I ALSO ALSO AGREE WITH YOU. SOME ARE VERY DANGEROUS.

.

carpbowe1970 wrote:

I ALSO ALSO AGREE WITH YOU. SOME ARE VERY DANGEROUS.

Please do not post in ALL CAPS.

Roundabouts are typically very much safer than traditional intersections.

Fixed

CraigW wrote:

By far, the most annoying roundabout I've been on is on Woody Mountain Rd just north of I-40 in west Flagstaff (and currently not IDed by City Nav. NA as a roundabout) due to several pre-roundabout zig zags, a tight-circle roundabout--and the fact that it was put in place for the entry to a housing development that been stalled for several years now so the roundabout currently serves no purpose at all.

I found the roundabout you're talking about and fixed it in Map Creator. I haven't seen a roundabout do that before where it kind of forks off and curves slightly for no reason.

Thanks

Narvick wrote:
CraigW wrote:

By far, the most annoying roundabout I've been on is on Woody Mountain Rd just north of I-40 in west Flagstaff (and currently not IDed by City Nav. NA as a roundabout) due to several pre-roundabout zig zags, a tight-circle roundabout--and the fact that it was put in place for the entry to a housing development that been stalled for several years now so the roundabout currently serves no purpose at all.

I found the roundabout you're talking about and fixed it in Map Creator. I haven't seen a roundabout do that before where it kind of forks off and curves slightly for no reason.

Thanks, I forgot I even posted about it. The slightly good news is that the housing development is underway so the roundabout may be justified in the next year or more.

If anyone wants to see it in Google Earth or elsewhere, it's at

35.183074 -111.692652

Northern AZ is offering roundabouts with a lot of new road construction or major road repair/realignments and I've had a chance to think about them vs. an intersection with lights or stop signs. I really have no preference. I'll take whatever I find. Even in Sedona and the Village of Oak Creek which can be packed with traffic, much being visitors from out-of-state and many drivers new to roundabouts, they work pretty well as long as you're careful to to keep an eye out for those whose duty it is to yield while cautiously claiming your right-of-way.

Roundabouts

Like them. Design is what makes them work or not. Lived in England many, many years ago (I'm not young) and that's what they like to use in a lot of cases.

Maine has them and had different rules than the ones in CT. MO started to get a few and now Fl seems to be getting into the action.

The ones around Augusta, ME seemed to be better for working traffic in and out of the circle.

Familiarity helps.

--
Curiosity is the acquisition of knowledge. And the death of cats.

traffic calming

Narvick wrote:
CraigW wrote:

By far, the most annoying roundabout I've been on is on Woody Mountain Rd just north of I-40 in west Flagstaff (and currently not IDed by City Nav. NA as a roundabout) due to several pre-roundabout zig zags, a tight-circle roundabout--and the fact that it was put in place for the entry to a housing development that been stalled for several years now so the roundabout currently serves no purpose at all.

I found the roundabout you're talking about and fixed it in Map Creator. I haven't seen a roundabout do that before where it kind of forks off and curves slightly for no reason.

I'd imagine it's for a traffic calming effect, to slow vehicles down a bit before getting to the circle.

--
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Like them

We have many being installed in Virginia of late. They accomplish the intended goal of allowing more traffic to flow, reduce the severity of any crashes and are cheaper to maintain than an intersection with lights. Each one that gets put in generates the usual whining about how they are dangerous and difficult to understand who has the ROW. My opinion is if you can't navigate a traffic circle successfully or it confuses you then you should not be driving in the first place.

Agree

fkent484 wrote:

We have many being installed in Virginia of late. They accomplish the intended goal of allowing more traffic to flow, reduce the severity of any crashes and are cheaper to maintain than an intersection with lights. Each one that gets put in generates the usual whining about how they are dangerous and difficult to understand who has the ROW. My opinion is if you can't navigate a traffic circle successfully or it confuses you then you should not be driving in the first place.

BUT there has to be a better standards for the construction of the circles. I find that sometimes, the overall diameter is too small causing eratic trajectories within the circle for circle exits.

--
If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem quickly resembles a nail. (Maslow's Hammer)

I think I know why

CraigW wrote:

By far, the most annoying roundabout I've been on is on Woody Mountain Rd just north of I-40 in west Flagstaff (and currently not IDed by City Nav. NA as a roundabout) due to several pre-roundabout zig zags, a tight-circle roundabout--and the fact that it was put in place for the entry to a housing development that been stalled for several years now so the roundabout currently serves no purpose at all.

I think I know why the odd approaches are there. As the road is straight, or fairly straight on the approach, the "wiggle" causes you to slow down more than just a sign would.

Roundabouts serve two general purposes, one to make intersections safer and two, as a traffic calming device to force drivers to slow down. Circles and roundabouts are generally safer as MM pointed out but are "new" to most drivers in North America so they don't understand the rules or courtesy required.

--
Illiterate? Write for free help.

Living in the Roundabout Capital

I live in Waterloo Region, which has a population of about 600K. The Region consists of three primary cities plus several towns and villages.

The Region has approximately 35-40 roundabouts, with close to 20 more planned in the next few years. No other municipality in Ontario and likely Canada has as many. Despite this, people still have issues. Part of the issues, stem from people that just don't handle driving comfortably. We have them in the city, out in the country and on highway roads.

Some from the idiots, that feel that have a right to charge through the roundabout, without regard for anyone else. These are the same people that accelerate through the amber and drift stop signs.

If one heeds the rules and yield to the driver that's in the lane, all goes well. One also have to balance being a bit aggressive at times and being properly patient. The problems come from the timid driver, that is afraid to make the move into the roundabout and the driver that charges through.

If you're in the right lane, you can only turn right, or go straight. Unfortunately, I see people making a left turn, in front of the driver that is attempting to go straight through from the center lane.

Stay in whatever lane that you're in, until you exit the roundabout. don't change lanes from within the roundabout.

Signal, left, if you're making a left turn and always use your right hand signal when you are about to use an exit.

Slow down, before entering. Just because the speed limit prior to the roundabout, is 80 kph (50 mph) doesn't mean you can enter at that speed.

I am a fan of roundabouts just the same and whatever, you think of them, they are better than four way stops and traffic lights in many cases. Accidents are rareley serious, because it's now a sideswipe, not a T-Bone and you have been naturally slowed down by the nature of the design.

They also speed traffic flow in many cases, compared to traffic lights and definitely compared to four way stops.

Get used to them. They're here to stay.

--
NUVI2555LMT, NUVI350

Yup

Box Car wrote:

I Think I Know Why
I think I know why the odd approaches are there. As the road is straight, or fairly straight on the approach, the "wiggle" causes you to slow down more than just a sign would.

True. My bother with this is that since writing about this roundabout about four years ago, this road gets about one vehicle every 5-10 minutes travelling at about 35mph and the reason for the roundabout's creation was for two non-existent subdivisions. Also, the wiggle and the super-tight radius make this frustration worse. Oh well, in a couple or more years the subdivision to the east may have substantial residents and in 1-2 decades maybe there'll be a subdivision to the west. Still, the road is basically an access to an unpaved Forest Road and it's hard to imagine it ever having substantial through or cross traffic.

One possible explanation for the roundabout's appearance is that the city or county required the subdivision developer to construct or at least pay for the roundabout and the city/county asked for the Cadillac version since it wouldn't cost the city/county to have it done.

Yep

Box Car wrote:

I think I know why the odd approaches are there. As the road is straight, or fairly straight on the approach, the "wiggle" causes you to slow down more than just a sign would.

Roundabouts serve two general purposes, one to make intersections safer and two, as a traffic calming device to force drivers to slow down. Circles and roundabouts are generally safer as MM pointed out but are "new" to most drivers in North America so they don't understand the rules or courtesy required.

Didn't I already say that a few posts before yours razz

--
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Not in NJ

GPSgeek wrote:

~snip~

Get used to them. They're here to stay.

I live in PA, not many in my area, but nearby NJ used to have tons of them, and that is where I got my experience with them. Over the past ten or so years they've been getting rid of them. NJ's circles were difficult, it seemed no one knew the rules for the flow, the circle itself was two lanes too, so if you got into the inner circle you'd have a tough time getting out of the damn thing, no one would yield. I never liked them, or driving in general in NJ. Now they have a lot of "jug handles" to make a left turn with, (a small road that goes off to the right and puts you on the side street where you make a left onto to cross the road you just came off of) trouble is some intersection have an actual left turn lane. If you're not familiar with the road you don't know if you need to be in the left or right lane to make a left turn.

--
. 2 Garmin DriveSmart 61 LMT-S, Nuvi 2689, 2 Nuvi 2460, Zumo 550, Zumo 450, Uniden R3 radar detector with GPS built in, includes RLC info. Uconnect 430N Garmin based, built into my Jeep. .
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