Off-Road / Hiking Use

 

My 760 and 765t are almost useless for off-road/hiking
usage.

Are any of Garmin's newer models well-suited for such use?

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

Garmin has models designed for trail use . . .

such as the C60Sx that I use. Most are hand-held with belt clips and lanyards. I bought the TOPO maps to add to mine and use it all the time hiking in the woods and off-trail to record my tracks and hike stats. There are other dedicated models in Garmin's line. A fried always raves about the Etrex line.

Good luck!

--
Winston Churchill said, “Americans can always be counted on to do the right thing, after exhausting all other possibilities.”

Whut ZenHiker Said

You really want a dedicated hand-held unit for hiking if for no other reason than they are built much tougher than the automotive units. One stumble on the trail with one of those skinny new Nuvi's in your hand might mean the sudden end of your navigational guidance.

Forest Service Roads

I've used my 255W for driving some of the backroads on state forest lands here in AZ and I was pleasantly surprised how well the various numbered Forest Service Roads were showing up on the GPS. Definitely not good for hiking or backpacking unless you will be staying on the numbered FSR's. I have an Oregon 300 for hiking/backpacking loaded with the 24k top maps. I was told that the topos can be loaded into the 255W (if you have an SD card) but I haven't tried it as I have a dedicated hiking GPS.

--
OK.....so where the heck am I?

Actually; flying, not

Actually; flying, not hiking. Trying to create a
budget aviation GPS for a pilot buddy. (I've got all
the FAA lat:lon data.)

I was astonished to learn that my 760 & 765t don't
allow direct/off-road routes.

I prefer the screen size/geometry of the 7xx series.
The ruggedness of a hiking unit is not necessary.

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

760 Off Road

There's an off-road setting in the 760. I don't have access to mine at the moment, so I can't tell you exactly where it is, but it's buried pretty deep in the menus if I recall. Try looking under Setup, Navigation.

I hope someone else will come along with the precise location in the menus before you see this thread again.

Sturdy trumps every time

Agreed!

--
Garmin Nuvi 255W

> Try looking under Setup,

> Try looking under Setup, Navigation.

Thank you.

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

newer models

I think one problem you are going to find with the newer automotive GPS units even if they have an off road mode. When you have it take you to a waypoint in the off road mode it will draw a line from you to the waypoint, but when you move the line doesn't move with you it stays at the point where you first initiated the route and has an arrow pointing towards the route and telling you how far you are off route. A friend noticed this when he tried using two different Nuvis in the desert. I would find that to be somewhat of a pain.

I tried it with my old SP 2610 and my 76CSx and he tried it with his antique SP III and with all of those units the route line moved with the GPS. Another feature Garmin did away with in favor of another non GPS feature.

There may still be some models that work like the old ones did, but I don't know which ones it would be.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Newer Models

Don B wrote:

I think one problem you are going to find with the newer automotive GPS units even if they have an off road mode. When you have it take you to a waypoint in the off road mode it will draw a line from you to the waypoint, but when you move the line doesn't move with you it stays at the point where you first initiated the route and has an arrow pointing towards the route and telling you how far you are off route. A friend noticed this when he tried using two different Nuvis in the desert. I would find that to be somewhat of a pain.

I tried it with my old SP 2610 and my 76CSx and he tried it with his antique SP III and with all of those units the route line moved with the GPS. Another feature Garmin did away with in favor of another non GPS feature.

There may still be some models that work like the old ones did, but I don't know which ones it would be.

What Nuvi models did your friend try?

It has long been standard practice in off road/ off trail navigation to plot a straight line course from an initial point to a final point since there could be an infinite number of possible routes to the final point and the shortest distance would be a straight line.

The straight line you described (in bold above) is a COURSE line (not a ROUTE line), and you would get the same result with your 76CSx if you used the Go To feature on the Waypoint Page.

And as one travels toward the final point is it is normal to take note of how far off the original course one is at any given time. One would do that whether paper map and compass, or a GPSr was being used. My old Etrex, Etrex Legend, and Venture HC does that, so I would not agree that it is a "non GPS feature".

In addition to the course line, there is always a bearing line from one's current position to the final point.

I don't know if the "newer nuvi's" have the option of showing the bearing in data fields on the map and compass pages, or are able to set the compass pointer to "Bearing" in the manner of Garmin off road units since the original Etrex.

read my lips

Evert wrote:
Don B wrote:

I think one problem you are going to find with the newer automotive GPS units even if they have an off road mode. When you have it take you to a waypoint in the off road mode it will draw a line from you to the waypoint, but when you move the line doesn't move with you it stays at the point where you first initiated the route and has an arrow pointing towards the route and telling you how far you are off route. A friend noticed this when he tried using two different Nuvis in the desert. I would find that to be somewhat of a pain.

I tried it with my old SP 2610 and my 76CSx and he tried it with his antique SP III and with all of those units the route line moved with the GPS. Another feature Garmin did away with in favor of another non GPS feature.

There may still be some models that work like the old ones did, but I don't know which ones it would be.

What Nuvi models did your friend try?

It has long been standard practice in off road/ off trail navigation to plot a straight line course from an initial point to a final point since there could be an infinite number of possible routes to the final point and the shortest distance would be a straight line.

The straight line you described (in bold above) is a COURSE line (not a ROUTE line), and you would get the same result with your 76CSx if you used the Go To feature on the Waypoint Page.

And as one travels toward the final point is it is normal to take note of how far off the original course one is at any given time. One would do that whether paper map and compass, or a GPSr was being used. My old Etrex, Etrex Legend, and Venture HC does that, so I would not agree that it is a "non GPS feature".

In addition to the course line, there is always a bearing line from one's current position to the final point.

I don't know if the "newer nuvi's" have the option of showing the bearing in data fields on the map and compass pages, or are able to set the compass pointer to "Bearing" in the manner of Garmin off road units since the original Etrex.

Say what you want, but the feature his old SP III, my 2610 and my 76CSx has his 855 and his, I believe it's a 750 or 760, and my 2820 will not show a line from your current position to the final destination on the map when navigating off road. They have an arrow pointing toward your original route line and it tells how far you are off. With the 76CSx I am referring to using it on the map page not the compass page. As he says, when he is navigating off road in the desert it's pretty useless to have the line fixed. There are times when he comes up to natural obstacles and has to detour around them and it might be impossible to get back to the original route line so it's much handier to have the line follow his position. That way at a glance he always knows right where he's at in relationship to his final destination. I can see if you were using it in an airplane the old feature wouldn't be as important.
At one time Garmin must have thought the way the older units did it was the way to go. When he called Garmin about it to see if any models still had that feature, the rep was quite surprised that Garmin had removed it and agreed with him they should have left that one alone.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Off road feature

rainsux wrote:

I was astonished to learn that my 760 & 765t don't
allow direct/off-road routes.

My 1490t nor my 295 have off road features. My old Magellan Explorist has a great off-road feature. While on the map page, a broad red line from the origin to the waypoint is displayed. A faint dotted line is drawn from current position to destination. Two boxes below are customize-able. A choice of bearing, heading or direction for the first box and distance for the second box works well. Direction to the waypoint is relative to your heading. I wish my Garmins had off-road mode.

--
1490LMT 1450LMT 295w

Off-Road / Hiking Use

I just checked my 3790LMT and it has OFF ROAD settings. I haven't used it to see if it works or not.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

course line and bearing line

Don B wrote:

Say what you want, but the feature his old SP III, my 2610 and my 76CSx has his 855 and his, I believe it's a 750 or 760, and my 2820 will not show a line from your current position to the final destination on the map when navigating off road. They have an arrow pointing toward your original route line and it tells how far you are off.

Your 2820 has an “off road” choice but his 855 is has only “Automobile Bicycle and Pedestrian” modes.

And they are primarily automobile types with a basic “pedestrian” or “off road” feature added. The basic feature being the showing of a Course line but not the Bearing line.

Of course your 76CSx has the capability to choose between showing the Course line or the Bearing line on the map but it is a true “off road” unit.

My opinion is that if one is going where there are no roads or trails and has to dodge around sage brush, ponds, jumping cholla, etc. while trying to stay on a given course, then they should get a true off road unit instead of a vehicle type with a smidge of off road feature(s).

Either that or they could “stop navigation” when they get non-recoverably off-course and then hit “go to” again to plot a new course line.

One more time

Apparently I don't have a good command of the English language. The point I'm making is the old SP III and my SP 2610 both have, as you put it, true off road features, and will maintain a line from your present position to the destination the same as my 76CSx will on the map page. Someone at Garmin made the decision to drop that feature in the newer units. Presently my friend is using his old SP III and is perfectly happy with the way it works in the desert. The only problem is he can no longer get updated maps for it and would like to get a newer automotive unit with the same features.

Apparently you have never owned a 2610 or a SP III or you would know what I'm talking about.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

78S

Check out the GPSMAP 78S. It's listed as a nautical unit but I use it for Geocaching, routing, etc. It has settings (such as glide ratio) for flying. As I don't fly I've never checked them out. I love the unit though. smile

--
GPSMAP 76CSx - nüvi 760 - nüvi 200 - GPSMAP 78S

Off-Road / Hiking Use

Just found out by reading the 855 manual that it does have off road settings.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

True.

rthibodaux wrote:

Just found out by reading the 855 manual that it does have off road settings.

You get to it with Tools > Settings > Navigation. Change from "Faster" to "Off Road". But the 855 still won't operate the way Don B wants it to. It will just give the strait lines point-to-point, but it will not follow your movement and adjust the strait lines according to your current position.

--
Alan - Android Auto, DriveLuxe 51LMT-S, DriveLuxe 50LMTHD, Nuvi 3597LMTHD, Oregon 550T, Nuvi 855, Nuvi 755T, Lowrance Endura Sierra, Bosch Nyon

course and bearing lines

Don B wrote:

....... The point I'm making is the old SP III and my SP 2610 both have, as you put it, true off road features, and will maintain a line from your present position to the destination the same as my 76CSx will on the map page. Someone at Garmin made the decision to drop that feature in the newer units. Presently my friend is using his old SP III and is perfectly happy with the way it works in the desert. The only problem is he can no longer get updated maps for it and would like to get a newer automotive unit with the same features.

Apparently you have never owned a 2610 or a SP III or you would know what I'm talking about.

I have never owned a 2610 or a SP III but I fully understood that you were lamenting that the "newer nuvis" do not have have the Bearing line feature.

I was attempting to point out the apparent evolution of the 2820 and 855 beyond the 2610.

Also I tried to suggest a possible workaround: "Either that or they could “stop navigation” when they get non-recoverably off-course and then hit “go to” again to plot a new course line. Didn't that indicate that I knew what you were talking about?

What you were calling "newer" nuvis are actually fairly old ones, that have been discontinued for quite a while.

Thinking about that, I decided to do a test on my 285W. (I had not used it in an off road mode because I have always used my Etrex models for that.)

I went to Tools/Setting/System/Useage Mode and selected "Pedestrian".

Then I went to Tools/Settings/Navigation/Route Preference and selected "Off Road"

I then went to WhereTo/Browse Map and tapped on a point way out in a field behind my house.

On the map there was labled a "Start Point", a checkered flag at the destination and a line drawn between them. ( i.e. a course line).

As I walked around in the field, there was always a line from my "vehicle" marker to the destination flag (i.e. a bearing line)and the course line remained as initially set.

So my 285W shows both the course line and the bearing line at the same time.

Now, there are no data fields anywhere that I have found that gives the bearing or the course angles but the visual clues may be all your friend needs.

However the 285W is also now discontinued and I don't know if nuvis newer than mine have these features.

Edit: The two lines also appear when the Useage Mode is Automobile and Bicycle(with Route Preference set at Off Road).

Off-Road / Hiking Use

If the gps show a route line why can't the track line be used. It show where you have been. If you can see the line that is off your course why can't you use that to get back to the original route. It should be easy to get back to the route.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

Sometimes you cannot follow the original course line

rthibodaux wrote:

If the gps show a route line why can't the track line be used. It show where you have been. If you can see the line that is off your course why can't you use that to get back to the original route. It should be easy to get back to the route.

He was saying at times the lay of the land and physical objects in the way prevent staying on and getting back to the original course line.

His friend would like to have a bearing line which would always show a line from the "vehicle" icon to the destination point. Sort of like having a rope from you to the destination that you could keep pulling on till you got to where you wanted to be.

One could do the same thing by having the "vehicle" icon and the destination icon both visible on the screen and simply keep the front of the vehicle icon pointed toward the destination as much as possible.

And to make that less tedious, one could look out ahead in the world while the vehicle icon is pointing in the right direction and find a physical land mark to proceed toward.

Not very adequate for aviation

rainsux wrote:

Actually; flying, not hiking. Trying to create a
budget aviation GPS for a pilot buddy. (I've got all
the FAA lat:lon data.)

I was astonished to learn that my 760 & 765t don't
allow direct/off-road routes.

As others have pointed out, there is an off-road mode on the 760 and many other Nuvi models.

What is not apparent, is that the off-road mode just draws a straight 'route' line from your location to your destination. The line does not update as you travel and it does not remain 'pinned' to your 'vehicle'. Nor does it give you a compass heading to your destination. It's better than nothing, I guess. The few times I used my Nuvi on a commercial flight, I found that the North Up view, zoomed way out was amusing to watch as it updated itself.

Best check FAA requriements

johnc wrote:
rainsux wrote:

Actually; flying, not hiking. Trying to create a
budget aviation GPS for a pilot buddy. (I've got all
the FAA lat:lon data.)

I was astonished to learn that my 760 & 765t don't
allow direct/off-road routes.

As others have pointed out, there is an off-road mode on the 760 and many other Nuvi models.

What is not apparent, is that the off-road mode just draws a straight 'route' line from your location to your destination. The line does not update as you travel and it does not remain 'pinned' to your 'vehicle'. Nor does it give you a compass heading to your destination. It's better than nothing, I guess. The few times I used my Nuvi on a commercial flight, I found that the North Up view, zoomed way out was amusing to watch as it updated itself.

Basically you must use an FAA approved GPSr in your aircraft if you are using one for navigation purposes. And the FAA approved ones do not include any of the ones commonly used while driving automobiles.

> Basically you must use an

> Basically you must use an FAA approved GPSr in your
> aircraft if you are using one for navigation
> purposes.

Wrong. Incorrect. No. Non. Nyet.

There is no FAA requirement, for Part 91 operators,
to even carry any charts or any navigation devices
beyond a magnetic compass.

Your "must use an FAA approved" comment is utter
hawgwash for Part 91 operators.

-doug
Commercial Pilot

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

Load TOPO maps on the GPS and it will work fine.

For day hikes in good weather there is nothing wrong with using a road gps like the 7xx series.

BUT. It is not as durable for the purpose and the battery is not removable, nor will it last for days of use.

But it will load TOPO maps just as well, and often better, than many dedicated hiking gps units.

There are excellent topo maps available for free that are much better than Garmin's.

--
17

"Part 91 Operators"

rainsux wrote:

> Basically you must use an FAA approved GPSr in your
> aircraft if you are using one for navigation
> purposes.

Wrong. Incorrect. No. Non. Nyet.

There is no FAA requirement, for Part 91 operators,
to even carry any charts or any navigation devices
beyond a magnetic compass.

Your "must use an FAA approved" comment is utter
hawgwash for Part 91 operators
.

-doug
Commercial Pilot

I am not sure what you mean by a " Part 91 operator" because Part 91 is: Title 14 CFR PART 91—GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES and applies to all "operators" and there are all sorts of requirements beyond what you mentioned depending on exactly where the flight operations take place and under what conditions.

> not sure what you mean by

> not sure what you mean by a " Part 91 operator" ...

You should have stopped right there.

> because Part 91 is: Title 14 CFR PART 91—GENERAL
> OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES and applies to all
> "operators"

Wrong. Incorrect. No. Non. Nyet.

Part 91 governs non-commercial operators. i.e.
Private and corporate aircraft.

Part 135 governs on-demand commercial operators. i.e.
charters & air-taxi.

Part 121 governs scheduled commercial operators. i.e.
Most, not all, pax carrying airlines and some cargo
haulers.

Hint: Precisely none of Garmin's handheld
*aviation* specific navigators are approved by the
FAA (for primary navigation) ... and never will be.
Yet they dominate the industry and cockpits.

Tip: Whenever ramp-checked by a FSDO inspector ... if
asked, "how did you navigate the /insert complex
airspace here/ ?

The wrong answer: Using my Garmin WhizBand VI,
moving-map, aviation GPS. This will earn you a
bust (because none of the handheld aviation GPSs
are FAA approved for primary navigation).

One of many correct answers: I used my FAA/CAMI
approved, Mark I eyeballs and landmarks on the
ground. (Notice that I did not say "map." Maps are
optional for most Part 91 operators operating in VMC

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

Now that more is known about your pilot buddy's needs

rainsux wrote:

> not sure what you mean by a " Part 91 operator" ...

You should have stopped right there.

> because Part 91 is: Title 14 CFR PART 91—GENERAL
> OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES and applies to all
> "operators"

Wrong. Incorrect. No. Non. Nyet.
Part 91 governs non-commercial operators. i.e.
Private and corporate aircraft.

.....other Parts .....

OK so I should have said all operators under the scope of Part 91, which is what the context implies. It appears to me that there several types of operators according to the individual's qualifications and there are many types of operating conditions covered.

That is why I was trying to say that there is not A Part 1 operator, because that gives no indication of your friends qualifications or the conditions under which he would be flying using your cheapo gps system.

No question you as a PILOT know more about the rules than I do but you were not very forthcoming about the details of the conditons under which your pilot friend was going to use the "budget gps".

Had you said from the beginning that the pilot was just going to use the gpsr for causal augmentation information for dead-reckoning navigation during local flights (perhaps even without filing a flight plan?) or some such I would not have even mentioned any thing about FAA rules.

Or at least you could have given that detail in response to my post instead making that Part 91 non-definitive statement while calling my a post "hogwash".

Also how was I to know that you were a PILOT when I tried to offer some help?- Had I known that I would have assumed you knew the rules and would not have posted anything.

rainsux wrote:

Tip: Whenever ramp-checked by a FSDO inspector ... if
asked, "how did you navigate the /insert complex
airspace here/ ?

The wrong answer: Using my Garmin WhizBand VI,
moving-map, aviation GPS. This will earn you a
bust (because none of the handheld aviation GPSs
are FAA approved for primary navigation).

.....

Isn't that about the same thing I said:

Evert wrote:

Basically you must use an FAA approved GPSr in your aircraft if you are using one for navigation purposes. And the FAA approved ones do not include any of the ones commonly used while driving automobiles.

To which you replied "Wrong. Incorrect. No. Non. Nyet."

(I admit I left out the word "primary")

You freely chose to make-up

You freely chose to make-up factoids and present
them, and establish yourself, as someone knowledgeable
about the FAA rules and regs.

I don't believe that I baited you into embarrassing
yourself.

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

Off-Road / Hiking Use

I belive that you'll are getting off the subject the op wanted to know, he didn't mention anything about aircrafts. Not everyone of us are pilots.

--
3790LMT; 2595LMT; 3590LMT, 60LMTHD

OP

rthibodaux wrote:

I belive that you'll are getting off the subject the op wanted to know, he didn't mention anything about aircrafts. Not everyone of us are pilots.

Actually the Original Poster eventually did get around to mentioning that it was using a gpsr in aircraft that he was interested in.

But I am the OP. Yes, the

But I am the OP.

Yes, the topic has digressed. I tried to steer clear
of making this an aviation topic ... and did frame my
OP as off-road/hiking.

The replies were a bit divergent to my specific goals,
so I attempted to re-frame the discussion. That's
when the posers arrived.

Should I have pointed-out their hawgwash? That is yet
another discussion that is even further off-topic.

--
I spend 80% of my money on airplanes & beer. The rest is wasted.

productive and friendly

So let's all step back and keep the discussions productive and friendly...

Thanks in advance.

JM

Hiking and Biking

I have two units.
One for the car - 7xx
And one for Hiking and biking - Vista.
It seems you need one for travel and one for outdoor activities.
They each do the jobs they were intended for but not the other.
The Vista is also good for walking around towns, as we travel to other p laces.
The 7xx is not so good once it is out of the car.
My brother-in-law has the Colorado for outdoor activities and loves it.

--
It's these changes in latitudes, changes in attitudes Nothing remains quite the same With all of our running and all of our cunning If we couldn't laugh we would all go insane

topo maps available for free

Quote:

There are excellent topo maps available for free that are much better than Garmin's.

I would love to have that link.

You you know of any free marine maps?

--
It's these changes in latitudes, changes in attitudes Nothing remains quite the same With all of our running and all of our cunning If we couldn't laugh we would all go insane

Here you go

islanderswp wrote:
Quote:

There are excellent topo maps available for free that are much better than Garmin's.

I would love to have that link.

You you know of any free marine maps?

Topo link:
http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/

This is the link.Many of the maps are the best available. Period

CraigW wrote:
islanderswp wrote:
Quote:

There are excellent topo maps available for free that are much better than Garmin's.

I would love to have that link.

You you know of any free marine maps?

Topo link:
http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/

Yes:

http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/

--
17

..

rainsux wrote:

You freely chose to make-up factoids and present
them, and establish yourself, as someone knowledgeable
about the FAA rules and regs.

I don't believe that I baited you into embarrassing
yourself.

I don't see where I "embarrased myself"

I never intended to put fourth that I am an expert in FAA flight regulations I simply was trying to warn you about the existance of regulations at a time it was not apparent that you were a pilot and would know about them.

I told you what I thought the BASIC regulations were and tried to advise you to " check FAA requriements" yourself. The statement I made in that post apparently was not a "factoid" because you later stated the same thing yourself (after calling my statement "hogwash").

After your post about Part 91 I was simply looking it up and was trying to follow what you were saying about it. It was not making sense to me because as far as I could tell Part 91 is sort of a preface to the following Parts and has general requirements that have application to all operators. I was trying to discuss what I was finding and trying to understand what you had said, rather than "making up factoids to establish myself as someone knowledgeable".

I really don't think I deserve the dump you made on me.

BTW I am no expert on FAA Regulations but became aware of them back in 1988 when, as a mechanical engineer, I designed some equipment for installation in an air ambulance for Big Horn Airways in Sheridian Wyoming. I had to study the regs and then present the design calculations and drawings to the FAA for approval.

Also I am fairly familiar with reading Federal Regulations after many years of designing equipment for nuclear power plants in accordance with 10CFR50.

Back in June I had looked up some FAA gps requirements for a post in another thread.

When I saw your post here I thought I was reaching out with a friendly hand to help based on what I had learned, but drew back a bloody stub.

EDIT:

Based on my experiences with pilots while working for four years as a crew chief on F-84F and F-100D aircraft, and two years as a FBO lineman, the main expectation I have of pilots is for them to be arrogant. There are some exceptions (one is a good friend who even commanded an Air Force base) but you don't appear to be one of them.

upup and away

Evert wrote:

Basically you must use an FAA approved GPSr in your aircraft if you are using one for navigation purposes. And the FAA approved ones do not include any of the ones commonly used while driving automobiles.

I got to remember that next time I go flying.

check out the slide show.
http://bit.ly/qHd8v0

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Holy kite batman

That is all well and good but according to Rainsux you had better not tell the FAA that you are using that for your primary navigation system.

He says best you tell them you are using your calibrated Mark I eyeball and landmarks.

On the other hand I have no idea what requirements are for little putt putts like that. Can you fly over a "complex airspace" with that?

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

Evert wrote:

That is all well and good but according to Rainsux you had better not tell the FAA that you are using that for your primary navigation system.

He says best you tell them you are using your calibrated Mark I eyeball and landmarks.

On the other hand I have no idea what requirements are for little putt putts like that. Can you fly over a "complex airspace" with that?

I don't have to tell the FAA anything, they don't even know my name, not required.

I only need my calibrated eyeballs and keep tab of altitude and how to get back to my landing field, I use the GPS in case I'm going to fly over an specific location and as an aid to find my home field if I got to take a leak in a hurry.

If by "complex airspace" you mean populated areas there is no restriction other than altitude, west if I75 under 3000 feet, east the sky is the limit (I'll add more pictures later so you can see where we fly)

As far as restricted airspace I know where TIA is located and McDill AFB so we avoid those areas but we can land at any regional airport because we carry radios and can communicate with the tower and other aircraft in the area but we rather use a cow pasture so we don't have to contend with patterns and other traffic.

--
Garmin 38 - Magellan Gold - Garmin Yellow eTrex - Nuvi 260 - Nuvi 2460LMT - Google Nexus 7 - Toyota Entune NAV

Photos

flaco wrote:

........
If by "complex airspace" you mean populated areas there is no restriction other than altitude, west if I75 under 3000 feet, east the sky is the limit I'll add more pictures later so you can see where we fly)

I don't know complex air space from a hole in the ground. smile
I was quoting Rainsux. Here is the full statement:

rainsux wrote:

Tip: Whenever ramp-checked by a FSDO inspector ... if
asked, "how did you navigate the /insert complex
airspace here/
?

The wrong answer: Using my Garmin WhizBand VI,
moving-map, aviation GPS. This will earn you a
bust (because none of the handheld aviation GPSs
are FAA approved for primary navigation).

One of many correct answers: I used my FAA/CAMI
approved, Mark I eyeballs and landmarks on the
ground. (Notice that I did not say "map." Maps are
optional for most Part 91 operators operating in VMC

I assume your checklist includes pulling your nose to cage your Mark I eyeball before take off. smile

Those small aircraft are pretty neat. I have a friend that flys around in the Black Hills in one. Here are a few of his pictures (click on them to enlarge):

http://over-the-hillsadventures.blogspot.com/search/label/Ae...

I would enjoy seeing your pictures.

BTW if you click on the Black Hills Explorers link you will find some photos of a hiking group I belong to. (I am Clint)

You can hand off to George after take off , then you land it.

Why use a GPSr, unless you want to sight-see. Hopefully he has a Century III Autopilot or equivalent.

However if he does not have a autopilot then try this:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Excellent-Garmin-Pilot-III-Aviation-...

Auto-pilot on commercial aircrafts only requires pilots to do approximately three minutes of flying -- during take-off and landing.

Then there is automation-addiction:
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/automation-addiction-pilots...

--
Using Android Based GPS.The above post and my sig reflects my own opinions, expressed for the purpose of informing or inspiring, not commanding. Naturally, you are free to reject or embrace whatever you read.

Off Course?

Don B wrote:

I think one problem you are going to find with the newer automotive GPS units even if they have an off road mode. When you have it take you to a waypoint in the off road mode it will draw a line from you to the waypoint, but when you move the line doesn't move with you it stays at the point where you first initiated the route and has an arrow pointing towards the route and telling you how far you are off route. A friend noticed this when he tried using two different Nuvis in the desert. I would find that to be somewhat of a pain.

I don't think anybody has addressed this in regards to FLYING.

This is a GOOD feature when flying, especially if you're trying to avoid, say, a Prohibited area, Restricted area, etc. If you get off course a little bit, you really, really want to get back ON course ASAP. Not necessarily direct to your destination, next fix, etc., but back to your planned course so as to avoid F-16's at 350 knots on approach to McDill...

I got to count the rivets (actually, I think they were Jo-Bolts) in two F-16's once, when I was flying a 172 due south of Moody AFB. Very enlightening experience! I don't suggest this to anybody.

--
KD5XB in DM84

Thanks Jobl2

Thanks
Jobl2

--
It's these changes in latitudes, changes in attitudes Nothing remains quite the same With all of our running and all of our cunning If we couldn't laugh we would all go insane

Good feature

KD5XB wrote:
Don B wrote:

I think one problem you are going to find with the newer automotive GPS units even if they have an off road mode. When you have it take you to a waypoint in the off road mode it will draw a line from you to the waypoint, but when you move the line doesn't move with you it stays at the point where you first initiated the route and has an arrow pointing towards the route and telling you how far you are off route. A friend noticed this when he tried using two different Nuvis in the desert. I would find that to be somewhat of a pain.

I don't think anybody has addressed this in regards to FLYING.

This is a GOOD feature when flying, especially if you're trying to avoid, say, a Prohibited area, Restricted area, etc. If you get off course a little bit, you really, really want to get back ON course ASAP. Not necessarily direct to your destination, next fix, etc., but back to your planned course so as to avoid F-16's at 350 knots on approach to McDill...

I got to count the rivets (actually, I think they were Jo-Bolts) in two F-16's once, when I was flying a 172 due south of Moody AFB. Very enlightening experience! I don't suggest this to anybody.

I guess that would be a good feature for flying, Maybe the software person at Garmin that changed how that feature worked was a pilot. I can see how it would be good for marine use also.

--
Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

Off Road

Any POI's listed somewhere for Off Road doing some traveling and would like to make use of my Mud Grappler Tires.

Thanks

ChicagoComputerMedics

Sifu

--
Thanks Sifu Sifu Technology Services, Inc Chicago Computer Medics www.iOSGenius.com Where your Computer & Mobile comes First!

rainsux wrote:My 760 and

rainsux wrote:

My 760 and 765t are almost useless for off-road/hiking
usage.

Are any of Garmin's newer models well-suited for such use?

I used my 660 in pedestrian mode in Rome and it did a pretty good job. Sometimes took a while to figure out which direction I was going but it got us to where whe wanted to go. I never took it hiking though.