new & interesting places for your GPS

New, more precise GPS satellite.

 

http://gizmodo.com/#!5794178/the-most-precise-gps-satellite-in-the-world

More Accurate GPS

dannyt wrote:

http://gizmodo.com/#!5794178/the-most-precise-gps-satellite-in-the-world

How about making this a clickable link,thanks.

Cut him a bit of slack. The

Cut him a bit of slack. The board software is supposed to automatically turn the URL into a clickable link, but in this case it didn't.

Link from original post.

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"Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job." --Douglas Adams

Precise GPS

I had read that story and was wondering, if there is just one of those satellites up, what will the net accuracy be? If i am thinking correct - you need at least three birds to have a fix. So if one of them has the better accuracy, wouldnt that only be a 1/3 more accuracy? Not much improvement till more of them are online

Don't Be So Quick

Strephon_Alkhalikoi wrote:

Cut him a bit of slack. The board software is supposed to automatically turn the URL into a clickable link, but in this case it didn't.

Link from original post.

I did give him some slack I wasn't nasty in my request,I just asked for a clickable link if you would read any thing else I post I am very helpful and 99% of the time very nice..I also went to the website to find the article and couldn't find the article.Don't be so quick to attack.I even said thanks what more do you want.

Block IIF

Last of the Block II birds -- the real improvements start with the Block IIA birds which add new frequencies (launching in 2013 or thereabouts).

One of the big improvements with BLock IIF isn't so much what's in them as how they get there. Thanks to more powerful launch vehicles, an (extra) apogee motor isn't needed to boost the bird into its destination orbit. Instead, the booster places the bird directly in its operational orbit.

That means the mass which used to be taken up by the apogee motor can now be added back to the payload. Bigger transmitters? Sure! Better clocks? Sure, we've got the weight allowance and the power!

IIF also includes the L5 safety of life signal, which is in the 1100 MHz aero band.

New frequencies mean new receivers -- but probably not for a couple of years.

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

Does that mean we'll have to

Does that mean we'll have to replace all our existing GPS's???

Inquiring minds want to know. If it's true, I'll stick with my current GPS's until I buy newer compatible units for the new birds.

Thanks.
Fred

the more things change...

FZbar wrote:

Does that mean we'll have to replace all our existing GPS's???

Inquiring minds want to know. If it's true, I'll stick with my current GPS's until I buy newer compatible units for the new birds.

Thanks.
Fred

Oh, eventually, if you want to make use of the new frequencies/features.

On the other hand, the gear we have today will still work (well, ignoring Lightsquared).

Look at the introduction of WAAS -- comparing a GPS that supports WAAS with one that doesn't, you can know just how lost you are with even more precision!

Or, if you're cruising along at 30meters/sec (around 67 mph), does decreasing the circular error probability of your location from 3 meters to 1 meter make any realistic difference at all? I don't think so.

Oh, I'm sure the increased accuracy will enable all sorts of applications we haven't thought of. But our mundane uses such as, "the POI sez there's a Leather Worx store ... there it is!" aren't going to be changed much.

--
2008 Mini Cooper S, Nuvi 2460, 680, DATUM Tymserve 2100, Trimble Thunderbolt, Ham radio, Macintosh, Linux, Windows

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