appliances

 

Sunday night, my wife said she heard a pop and the gas dryer stopped working.

Since electrical was fine, I assumed it would be the belt, which I've never actually seen.

A quick YouTube showed what it was, and off to Lowe's we went at 19:43 EDT when they close at 20:00.

The belt was not where it was supposed to be, and it was $3 more at $14. Great online portal lol (and I own the stock, but prefer HD).

3 people who didn't even work in the dept. helped me find it--great job.

What should have been a 20 minute job turned into 2 hours.

The dryer is from 1984, and I got it with the house in 2002. The previous owner must have replaced it once, because the bottom panel was held on by strapping tape.

The trickiest part of the job was to figure out how the felt works that basically prevents anything from catching the door/panel while spinning. It was compressed on the top, as the tub leans in at the top. I removed it altogether and then it was squeaking at a high frequency.

Finally got it in and all is well. Because it's really very simple, I don't see why it would not last another 20 years and celebrate its 60th birthday.

The tensioning system is laughable, a plastic wheel attached to a piece of metal that can flex. Comparing it to a 1970s car, or a 2000's car that has hydraulic tensioning, simple truly works.

Appliances these days make me nervous. One you can't get what you want, you have to choose what's available. Our 2002 fridge is $1700 to replace today, and out of stock. The reason we need this particular model is previous owners built the cabinets around it. It's somewhat amazing to be able to buy a product in 2022, that's virtually unchanged from what you got 20 years ago, but at more than double the price. In the case of this fridge, it has electronic controls over a knob, but everything else the same.

Knobs Preferred

Living in Florida, we have lots of lightning. Appliances with conventional mechanical knobs for the controls tend to survive the power surges much better than the appliances with fancy digital displays. Even with an Eaton whole house surge protector, I still prefer to keep it simple with mechanical knob controls on appliances.

And

EV Driver wrote:

Living in Florida, we have lots of lightning. Appliances with conventional mechanical knobs for the controls tend to survive the power surges much better than the appliances with fancy digital displays. Even with an Eaton whole house surge protector, I still prefer to keep it simple with mechanical knob controls on appliances.

Devices with knobs are getting harder and harder to find..

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

How many kids can count out change from a transaction without looking at a digital cash register?

So if it's got knows and no buttons or displays, the kiddies are likely not able to figure out how to use it!

--
Never argue with a pig. It makes you look foolish and it anoys the hell out of the pig!

^^The dumbing down of

^^The dumbing down of society.... dumb folk easier to control.

Best auto theft deterrent these days --- car with 3 pedals.

Ramification of non digital clocks

BarneyBadass wrote:

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

Many years ago (1990's) I was teaching a course on rotating machinery and made reference to the direction of rotation, i. e., "clockwise" or "counterclockwise". A few engineers actually didn't know what the terms meant. The company facilities at the time had digital clocks, but the owner immediately had them replaced with analog.

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John from PA

Oh. I believe it.

The simple things that make life easy and they have no clue. A few years ago I ran across a professor that had shelves of "old" things like rotary phones and analog clocks. He uses them as discussion points.

John from PA wrote:
BarneyBadass wrote:

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

Many years ago (1990's) I was teaching a course on rotating machinery and made reference to the direction of rotation, i. e., "clockwise" or "counterclockwise". A few engineers actually didn't know what the terms meant. The company facilities at the time had digital clocks, but the owner immediately had them replaced with analog.

--
Nuvi 2460LMT.

I recently discovered my 80+

I recently discovered my 80+ yr old mother was taught in terms of 24 hours. The whole concept of am/pm was foreign to her and something she had to learn after coming to the US.

There's a number of digital clocks around the house that support 24hr format. I promptly changed them all. I was raised in the US but too prefer the 24hr format over am/pm. As an engineering type, I find ambiguity quite annoying.

Answer to question #1

BarneyBadass wrote:
EV Driver wrote:

Living in Florida, we have lots of lightning. Appliances with conventional mechanical knobs for the controls tend to survive the power surges much better than the appliances with fancy digital displays. Even with an Eaton whole house surge protector, I still prefer to keep it simple with mechanical knob controls on appliances.

Devices with knobs are getting harder and harder to find..

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

How many kids can count out change from a transaction without looking at a digital cash register?

So if it's got knows and no buttons or displays, the kiddies are likely not able to figure out how to use it!

Very few.
Answer to question #2. Less than question #1.
Back in the mid ‘90’s, I drove a manual transmission school bus for a local high school band. (Almost all of the buses had automatic transmissions.) None of the other bus drivers could drive them except for two. Out of approximately 40 drivers, two could drive a manual transmission, and one of those couldn’t drive it very good. (There was a lot of jumping when she got behind the wheel.)
As far as 24 hour time, I have been using it since I entered the military when I was 19 years old. That was a long, long time ago.

--
With God, all things are possible. ——State motto of the Great State of Ohio

was

maddog67 wrote:
BarneyBadass wrote:
EV Driver wrote:

Living in Florida, we have lots of lightning. Appliances with conventional mechanical knobs for the controls tend to survive the power surges much better than the appliances with fancy digital displays. Even with an Eaton whole house surge protector, I still prefer to keep it simple with mechanical knob controls on appliances.

Devices with knobs are getting harder and harder to find..

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

How many kids can count out change from a transaction without looking at a digital cash register?

So if it's got knows and no buttons or displays, the kiddies are likely not able to figure out how to use it!

Very few.
Answer to question #2. Less than question #1.
Back in the mid ‘90’s, I drove a manual transmission school bus for a local high school band. (Almost all of the buses had automatic transmissions.) None of the other bus drivers could drive them except for two. Out of approximately 40 drivers, two could drive a manual transmission, and one of those couldn’t drive it very good. (There was a lot of jumping when she got behind the wheel.)
As far as 24 hour time, I have been using it since I entered the military when I was 19 years old. That was a long, long time ago.

Just talking to a SVP at my co (who's about 40) and noted he refers to some staff as "kids." He lowered his voice and said if we don't make all kinds of accommodations, they know they can have a job tomorrow somewhere else. So that accounts for remote work anytime, which from my observation is our entire culture doesn't know who will be in the office on any given day and who will not. This only started with the pandemic.

So when we got to talking about cars, I said I prefer a manual transmission and even with BMW you basically have two choices (maybe more dunno). M2, and M3 (M4) base model. He said, I don't even know how to drive a stick. At 40, I get it, they began driving in the mid-late 90s. I got my first new car in 1998, and it was a Maxima 5-speed and even then, was difficult to get. They had 14 cars on the lot and 2 were sticks. The reason I remember so well is it was my first new car and I got $6,500 off a list of $29,400. Nissan has always been the BJ's of the warehouse clubs. If they don't give things away, they can't hang with the top tier dogs lol Funny that car is still running.

When I was a kid we were afraid of the school bus drivers. They were all manuals and I remember as a kid hoping the driver would show up any given day with a diesel bus, since the gas was always struggling to get up hills...

.

John from PA wrote:
BarneyBadass wrote:

How many kids these days can look at a non digital clock and tell you what time it is?

Many years ago (1990's) I was teaching a course on rotating machinery and made reference to the direction of rotation, i. e., "clockwise" or "counterclockwise". A few engineers actually didn't know what the terms meant. The company facilities at the time had digital clocks, but the owner immediately had them replaced with analog.

A wise decision!

Love My Standard Shift

zx1100e1 wrote:

^^The dumbing down of society.... dumb folk easier to control.

Best auto theft deterrent these days --- car with 3 pedals.

Still love my standard shift until I went to valet parking one day and the guy couldn't park it since he only new automatic. How did he get that job?

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Garmin: GPSIII / StreetPilot / StreetPilot Color Map / StreetPilot III / StreetPilot 2610 / GPSMAP 60CSx / Nuvi 770 / Nuvi 765T / Nuvi 3490LMT / Drivesmart 55 / GPSMAP 66st * Pioneer: AVIC-80 / N3 / X950BH