Any RV enthusiast?

 

Just bought my first motorhome last year, albeit she's an old one, but got it cheap and it's a clean well maintained model, the prior owner had every record, of every oil change, and part they had to replace, 1995 Fleetwood Southwind.
I was wondering how many on here travel with their home in tow, and how you like it?
Do you have a particular navigation system that tells you the clearances of the roads you travel on?

The only Garmin GPS that

The only Garmin GPS that will give you route guidance for Clearances is one of the RV units or Dezl units. They won't give you clearances, they will route you with respect to clearances.

While not routing, I'm not sure if they will give you warning of road restrictions or not. They will, if you are "On Route".

The POI files for Low Clearances were pulled due to Copyright Restrictions some time ago.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

Thank you!

phranc wrote:

The only Garmin GPS that will give you route guidance for Clearances is one of the RV units or Dezl units. They won't give you clearances, they will route you with respect to clearances.

While not routing, I'm not sure if they will give you warning of road restrictions or not. They will, if you are "On Route".

The POI files for Low Clearances were pulled due to Copyright Restrictions some time ago.

wasn't sure if there was something out there that would help, other than my phone app grin

Garmin RV and Dezl links

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-c518-p1.html
https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-cTrucking-p1.html

These are links to the Garmin RV and Dezl units. You can find much better prices searching EBay, Amazon, or other online services. Don't be afraid of Refurbished units, especially if they note Factory Refurbished, one year manufacturers warranty, or similar guarantees.

Factory Refurbs will come in a plain white Garmin box.

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Frank Nuvi 3597LMT 37.322760, -79.511267

RV Clearances

We travel 7 to 10 months a year, pulling a 36 foot 5th wheel behind a Freightliner. I use a Garmin RV760 for my GPS. I have loaded a file from Low Clearances that I can customize to fit my needs. There is a fee for the file, but they have a very reasonable lifetime update option. You can set the heights and also set a warning distance for your GPS to notify you. It offers me some peace of mind while travelling unfamiliar roads!

Good luck with the RV and ...... Travel Safe!

see this thread

See this recent thread:

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/48366

You can check the ParkAdviser phone app.

It shows low clearance and other useful information on a map. I do know that is not complete.

I think they get their low clearance information from reports from individuals. If so, that means that obscure roads are less likely to be on their map.

If you get back in the boonies, you also need to consider weight limits and dead ends.

thank you again!

phranc wrote:

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-c518-p1.html
https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-cTrucking-p1.html

These are links to the Garmin RV and Dezl units. You can find much better prices searching EBay, Amazon, or other online services. Don't be afraid of Refurbished units, especially if they note Factory Refurbished, one year manufacturers warranty, or similar guarantees.

Factory Refurbs will come in a plain white Garmin box.

great post!

dobs108 wrote:

See this recent thread:

http://www.poi-factory.com/node/48366

Thank you, learned some things I didn't even think of!

Thank you!

SilverRhino wrote:

We travel 7 to 10 months a year, pulling a 36 foot 5th wheel behind a Freightliner. I use a Garmin RV760 for my GPS. I have loaded a file from Low Clearances that I can customize to fit my needs. There is a fee for the file, but they have a very reasonable lifetime update option. You can set the heights and also set a warning distance for your GPS to notify you. It offers me some peace of mind while travelling unfamiliar roads!

Good luck with the RV and ...... Travel Safe!

I'm going to check into the Garmin RV760, and file, that will help a lot!

Thank you!

zeaflal wrote:

It shows low clearance and other useful information on a map. I do know that is not complete.

I think they get their low clearance information from reports from individuals. If so, that means that obscure roads are less likely to be on their map.

If you get back in the boonies, you also need to consider weight limits and dead ends.

I went ahead and downloaded the app, now I just have to figure out how to use it! grin

awesome!

phranc wrote:

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-c518-p1.html
https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/cOnTheRoad-cTrucking-p1.html

These are links to the Garmin RV and Dezl units. You can find much better prices searching EBay, Amazon, or other online services. Don't be afraid of Refurbished units, especially if they note Factory Refurbished, one year manufacturers warranty, or similar guarantees.

Factory Refurbs will come in a plain white Garmin box.

gotta check that out as well, thank you!

RV770 Refurb For $299

An excellent price for a Garmin RV770 refurb:

https://www.gpscity.com/garmin-rv-770lmt-s-(certified-refurbished)

I have it's predecessor, the RV760, and am very happy with it's features and performance.

How big?

Big motorhomes are the size of a big bus, but even smaller ones have considerations. Get a ladder, tape measure and a friend and determine the actual height of your coach taking into consideration, the air conditioner or whatever is the highest thing up there. Make a sticker with that height in feet (and meters if you ever plan to go to Canada) and place it on the dash or windshield for immediate reference. You won't have concerns on most roads, but there are a couple of places where YouTube videos show trucks and big RVs routinely get a serious haircut going through the overpass. The most common areas of trouble are some older gas stations with overhangs and drive up ATM machines. I recently had a close encounter with a 9' overhang at a gas station as I was focusing making the turn off the street without hitting a parked van. As I tow a small travel trailer, I rarely have to think about this and fortunately someone yelled stop before I got too far.

As to the other part of your question. RV travel/lifestyle isn't for everyone. An owner with DIY abilities and a basic understanding of plumbing and electricity will have a better experience as they may better understand how the various systems work and how to fix the minor things that seem to crop up on a regular basis.

A '95 model is less complex than some of the newer ones.

A cousin has a Garmin RV770 and like all GPS units, it's not perfect. It has a place to input the dimensions and weight of the RV and that data determines which routes are viable. So far he's been satisfied.

--
"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Thank you!

bdhsfz6 wrote:

An excellent price for a Garmin RV770 refurb:

https://www.gpscity.com/garmin-rv-770lmt-s-(certified-refurbished)

I have it's predecessor, the RV760, and am very happy with it's features and performance.

I will deff check it out!! grin

35ft

TXRVer wrote:

Big motorhomes are the size of a big bus, but even smaller ones have considerations. Get a ladder, tape measure and a friend and determine the actual height of your coach taking into consideration, the air conditioner or whatever is the highest thing up there. Make a sticker with that height in feet (and meters if you ever plan to go to Canada) and place it on the dash or windshield for immediate reference. You won't have concerns on most roads, but there are a couple of places where YouTube videos show trucks and big RVs routinely get a serious haircut going through the overpass. The most common areas of trouble are some older gas stations with overhangs and drive up ATM machines. I recently had a close encounter with a 9' overhang at a gas station as I was focusing making the turn off the street without hitting a parked van. As I tow a small travel trailer, I rarely have to think about this and fortunately someone yelled stop before I got too far.

As to the other part of your question. RV travel/lifestyle isn't for everyone. An owner with DIY abilities and a basic understanding of plumbing and electricity will have a better experience as they may better understand how the various systems work and how to fix the minor things that seem to crop up on a regular basis.

A '95 model is less complex than some of the newer ones.

A cousin has a Garmin RV770 and like all GPS units, it's not perfect. It has a place to input the dimensions and weight of the RV and that data determines which routes are viable. So far he's been satisfied.

Very good advise! I thought about the height thing, and some people were telling me I didn't need to worry about that because bridges had to be a certain height, and my RV was fine, but I think your advise sounds much more reasonable, and this is such a huge learning curve for me, thank you

I'm going to invest in the Garmin for the RV, I think that would also help me tremendously

Low bridges are out there

fkeddy wrote:

some people were telling me I didn't need to worry about that because bridges had to be a certain height, and my RV was fine,

I know of one underpass labeled 8'2", one lane wide on a blind turn. It feels tight in a car.

Take note of the signs

There are more than enough road signs to absorb. In my opinion, driving a motorhome or towing a trailer requires more attention than many motorists use driving a passenger car. We have to think about where the rear wheels are tracking when negotiating a corner and adjust to the longer stopping distances we often need. We have tail swing that we first encounter with those niece yellow posts protecting the gas islands. Then there are the signs. If one says No Trucks or Trailers, there is a very good reason not to proceed. There are a couple of parkways in Connecticut that permit busses but not trailers. I'm not sure if motorhomes are okay, but probably not if towing a toad. Tunnels along the East Coast generally prohibit vehicles with propane tanks, but some allow if under a certain size if the valves are closed. Some either miss these signs or can't read them in entrity at the posted speed limit. Hopefully an RV specific GPS will avoid these things...

--
"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597

Very True

TXRVer wrote:

There are more than enough road signs to absorb. In my opinion, driving a motorhome or towing a trailer requires more attention than many motorists use driving a passenger car. We have to think about where the rear wheels are tracking when negotiating a corner and adjust to the longer stopping distances we often need. We have tail swing that we first encounter with those niece yellow posts protecting the gas islands. Then there are the signs. If one says No Trucks or Trailers, there is a very good reason not to proceed. There are a couple of parkways in Connecticut that permit busses but not trailers. I'm not sure if motorhomes are okay, but probably not if towing a toad. Tunnels along the East Coast generally prohibit vehicles with propane tanks, but some allow if under a certain size if the valves are closed. Some either miss these signs or can't read them in entrity at the posted speed limit. Hopefully an RV specific GPS will avoid these things...

Unless you are a professional or drive your RV all year, it is definitely a daunting task to keep up with highway signage.

FWIW, I find my RV760 to be a big help with finding RV friendly routes and POI stops.

concern about propane and carbon monoxide

With the cold weather coming on I am concerned about propane heating and hot-water heaters. I am a boater, not an RVer, but many boats have all the systems an RV does. There have been fatalities on boats because of a lack of ventilation while propane heat was in use. These have been publicized, but I haven't heard of any such instances in RVs.

I don't know how practical it would be to live in an RV in winter.

dobs108 neutral

Propane is just like natural gas..

Maybe it's a warmer climate thing but I see thousands living in RV's in Trailer parks, KOA and others like this. If you have a propane leak it will smell like rotten eggs, just like natural gas. Just like natural gas propane can cause an explosion. I delivered it for 4 years and understood what it would do if I or the customer didn't respect it. Most accidents are when someone takes a shortcut or doesn't do required or common sense maintenance. I wouldn't go over two years without having my gas furnace looked at and propane isn't any different if used indoors. Just like a home you should also have smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

a Garmin for RV or Truckers version (Dezl) is worth having..

Neither is a cure all and doesn't replace common sense or the need to be watching road signs for low clearances, weight/length/height restrictions, sharp turns, speed limit changes and the like. I now use a Dezl 770 and it helps me do my job but it's not an excuse for not paying attention to road warning signs or just simply watching the road. A GPS is a tool to help you, it's not an excuse for not paying attention.

Low Clearances

SilverRhino wrote:

We travel 7 to 10 months a year, pulling a 36 foot 5th wheel behind a Freightliner. I use a Garmin RV760 for my GPS. I have loaded a file from Low Clearances that I can customize to fit my needs. There is a fee for the file, but they have a very reasonable lifetime update option. You can set the heights and also set a warning distance for your GPS to notify you. It offers me some peace of mind while travelling unfamiliar roads!

Good luck with the RV and ...... Travel Safe!

Thanks, I've been wondering if Low Clearances files were worth the dollars they ask for it.

Detercor replacement

Frside007 wrote:

Just like a home you should also have smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

RVs should have working smoke, carbon monoxide and LPG detectors. The smoke detector is typically mounted on the ceiling, the CO detector is often on a wall in the sleeping area near the ceiling, or it may be combined with the smoke detector. Both are typically operated by replaceable batteries. The LPG detector is mounted low, near the floor and is most often directly wired to the house battery. These detectors have a finite life, often between 7-10 years. There may be a date sticker on the backside of the detectors showing the year of manufacture. The owner sheet is often lost, but Google may provide the info regarding suggested replacement interval. If older or in doubt, it is best to replace them.

One thing to consider is that detectors in the home are noticed when the battery becomes weak or the device sounds an end of life signal, but those in RVs in storage, will likely go unnoticed and go silent by the time the user prepares it for a trip and gives them no thought.

Be safe...

Trailers with removable LPG tanks are connected to the regulator with a short length of hose. These seem to get brittle with time and exposure and often leak near the connectors. I notice that mine begin to leak around 3 years, but they are easy to replace. Inspect the length of hose that runs from the regulator to the trailer's copper gas line if it looks weather checked or suspect.

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"There's no substitute for local knowledge" nüvi 750, nüvi 3597